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Old 05-22-2019, 09:09 AM
 
719 posts, read 435,529 times
Reputation: 760

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobsell View Post
Sounds like you don't know what you want to do for a living.

Take a free Myers-Briggs test online. Then search for "jobs for ISTJ's" or whatever your personality is.

Now let's talk about the jobs.

Dentistry: Where do you plan on working? Your own office? Expenses will bankrupt you.

Finance: Most finance jobs are sales jobs. You willing to have a single digit commission check from a bad streak?

Engineering and Non-sales finance jobs - there are no entry level jobs that require no experience except sales or Mcjobs.

Disagree on the bold above. Right out of college, I interviewed for a client service job (i.e., phones) at a mutual fund company. Got the job even though I had no idea what a mutual fund was before the interview. Twenty-two years later, I'm obviously not on the phones anymore, but I'm still at the same company and not in a sales position. Now granted, when I graduated college (in 1996), the job market and economy were different than today.

Last edited by Flyers Girl; 05-22-2019 at 09:18 AM..
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Old 05-22-2019, 09:25 AM
 
Location: Pittsford, NY
520 posts, read 625,581 times
Reputation: 581
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyers Girl View Post
when I graduated college (in 1996), the job market and economy were different than today.

Ahhh the 90's when good jobs were just about everywhere.... Wish my kids (all graduates) found it like that now.
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Old 05-22-2019, 10:51 AM
 
7,384 posts, read 11,551,642 times
Reputation: 8187
Quote:
Originally Posted by geraltofsnivia View Post

I'll admit a good bit of my career decisions gravitate around salary and prestige but not entirely, if that were the case I would have simply chose dentistry and moved on since the average dentist likely makes more than the average finance/engineering worker. I'm definitely gonna take that personality assessment though.
I would recommend that you think of a job/career as more of what you will be doing very specifically and how you will acquire those skills as opposed to how much you will be making and what you will be doing more generally. The three jobs you have listed are very, very different, though engineering and finance are more similar.

Also job environment.

I'll give you an example.

I just spent the past week getting cursed at over conference calls by clients. I mean it wasn't like f-bomb this, f-bomb that, but 'How much more ****ing money is this going to cost us?"

Etc. The amount of stress you face on a daily basis, what contributes to that stress, and what kind of person is best suited to deal (or even be the source of) those stresses.

This are the things I rarely see discussed on these forums, but they should be.
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Old 05-22-2019, 11:38 AM
 
Location: Greensboro, NC
645 posts, read 240,151 times
Reputation: 1546
I can only speak for Engineering here. My background is BS in Mechanical Engineering, with several years experience as a Manufacturing/Process Engineer.

1. If you go that route, make damn sure you get an internship or co-op. Otherwise, the job market is absolutely brutal for those who have the degree but no experience. I did the co-op program but still had trouble finding that first post-college job - granted that was back in 2010. Each job change after that was progressively "easier"

2. There seems to be more and more non-technical engineering jobs and a general dumbing-down by more companies who want engineers to, rather than deep technical work, spend obnoxious amounts of time doing a) tasks that should really be completed by an intern, technical assistant, etc., b) ridiculous and senseless fire-fighting, and/or c) "people-projects". This is very prevalent in Manufacturing Engineering. There are also some engineering jobs that really should be labeled as project managers, as you're really doing very little of the technical nitty-gritty and more-so coordinating activities. On the flip side, those jobs seem to have a better path towards management, if that's what you really want. Make sure to take on internships in both the more technical and not-so-technical (mentioned above) sides of engineering roles to get a decent feel for them.

3. Once you go down a post-college career path in a particular field of engineering, you are going to get extremely pigeon-holed in the eyes of most companies. So be absolutely certain you get exposure during internships to make the choice that's right for you. Even trying to switch between two engineering functions which require the same degree may still lead to a bunch frustrating hoops to jump through, should you decide down the road that you don't like your current field. I know firsthand, so don't make the same mistake I did.
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Old 05-22-2019, 04:32 PM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
4,645 posts, read 3,701,111 times
Reputation: 8629
I'll give you the same advice I've given coaching clients in the past (I had careers in both software engineering and clinical counseling before my retirement): a great investment of your time and money is the Self-Directed Search, which you can take here for $9.95 USD:

Discover Your Passion | Self-Directed Search

It's a personality test based on interest. A career counselor or coach would likely either give you this test or the Strong Interest Inventory; both of these are based on Holland's theory of career preference. I frankly would see the Myers-Briggs as supplementary data, and the Self-Directed Search as the meat and potatoes of your decision process. The site above has sample reports you can examine to see what kind of data you'll get - here's the link to the standard report:

http://www.self-directed-search.com/...port%20RIE.pdf

It's an extensive report that suggests a number of possible career choices for you based on your preferences. The report will include a link to O*Net Online (a site maintained by the U.S Department of Labor) where you can research various aspects of the career in detail (you can also go to onetonline.net, put in a career name in Occupation Quick Search with or without getting the Self Directed Search report). This includes data like job prospects for the future, education needed, skills used on the job, and so on.

https://www.onetonline.org/

Note that the Self Directed Search isn't saying you'll be good at a career - rather, that many people with a personality profile similar to yours have reported high degrees of job satisfaction with that choice. Also note that an aptitude test doesn't tell you whether a particular choice is a great one for someone with your preferences.
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Old 05-22-2019, 05:19 PM
 
15 posts, read 2,379 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by jobaba View Post
I would recommend that you think of a job/career as more of what you will be doing very specifically and how you will acquire those skills as opposed to how much you will be making and what you will be doing more generally. The three jobs you have listed are very, very different, though engineering and finance are more similar.

Also job environment.

I'll give you an example.

I just spent the past week getting cursed at over conference calls by clients. I mean it wasn't like f-bomb this, f-bomb that, but 'How much more ****ing money is this going to cost us?"

Etc. The amount of stress you face on a daily basis, what contributes to that stress, and what kind of person is best suited to deal (or even be the source of) those stresses.

This are the things I rarely see discussed on these forums, but they should be.

Wow I can imagine that ruining your day ha; I tend to handle stressful situations well, though obviously I would prefer to avoid them altogether. I would never go down the i-banking or hedge fund route. How is corporate finance in terms of job security/stress levels?
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Old 05-23-2019, 08:50 PM
 
2,420 posts, read 690,595 times
Reputation: 3402
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tonyafd View Post
One question: Don't dentists need to have an MD before they become dentists?
No.

They need a bachelor's degree, and then choose one:
* D.D.S. Doctor of Dental Science
* D.M.D. Doctor of Dental Medicine

After that, pass the Dental boards and they're ready to go.
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Old 05-24-2019, 09:05 AM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
4,645 posts, read 3,701,111 times
Reputation: 8629
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobsell View Post
No.

They need a bachelor's degree, and then choose one:
* D.D.S. Doctor of Dental Science
* D.M.D. Doctor of Dental Medicine

After that, pass the Dental boards and they're ready to go.
The "after that" part typically involves another 3-4 years beyond the bachelor's degree (which is true of pretty much any field that requires a doctorate); some states require a residency beyond the doctorate, other states don't. If you specialize that will require additional educatino.

Dentist Educational Path and Degree Requirements | Doctorly.org
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Old 05-24-2019, 09:21 AM
 
Location: League City
3,378 posts, read 6,596,489 times
Reputation: 3985
Quote:
Originally Posted by jobaba View Post
I would recommend that you think of a job/career as more of what you will be doing very specifically and how you will acquire those skills as opposed to how much you will be making and what you will be doing more generally. The three jobs you have listed are very, very different, though engineering and finance are more similar.

Also job environment.

I'll give you an example.

I just spent the past week getting cursed at over conference calls by clients. I mean it wasn't like f-bomb this, f-bomb that, but 'How much more ****ing money is this going to cost us?"

Etc. The amount of stress you face on a daily basis, what contributes to that stress, and what kind of person is best suited to deal (or even be the source of) those stresses.

This are the things I rarely see discussed on these forums, but they should be.
Yep I have to re-emphasize these things. Agree 110%. There are intangibles that can affect your overall health and have a lot less to do with earning capacity. But they will affect your earnings if you begin to acquire stress related conditions.

As I have grown older stress (rather the lack of) and stability are parameters that are right up there with salary.
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Old 05-24-2019, 11:58 AM
 
Location: SNA=>PDX 2013
2,660 posts, read 3,050,698 times
Reputation: 3112
Can you job shadow anyone for a day or couple of days?

I work in the dental field. Few things to remember. 1. Dentist still have one of the highest rates of suicide. 2. If you open your own practice, you'll have to be good at sales, networking, advertising, running a business, dentistry, and hiring people (if you can find a great manager/accountant, that'll help a lot). 3. You can go to more "corporate dentistry" where all you do is the dentistry part and the corporation hires your assistants, hygineists, managers. Less stress, but also less autonomy. 4. did I mention sales? How do you feel about that? Because that's how you make your money in a private practice. Gonna have to pay off that huge debt! 5. if you're willing to work in small towns/under priviledged areas, many of them have some $$ towards loan forgiveness

OTOH, I know many dentists who are super happy. At my company, we aren't corporate dentistry, but we do all the hiring, dentists get salary guarantees, they have full benefits, PTO, don't have to sell anything, nor sell anything to make money. Some really really love it, some hate it. It's all subjective.

I'd see if you can job shadow a dentist in a "doing great" private practice, maybe find one that's struggling a bit, and a corporate one (think Aspen Dental, Gentle Dental, Pacific Dental). That'll show you options and if you really want to go into dentistry. Most companies will accommodate it.
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