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Old 05-22-2019, 10:18 AM
 
63 posts, read 33,221 times
Reputation: 273

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
She won't know you're planning to leave, until she gets called for a recommendation, right? So she won't ask you, until you actually have the job in the bag. Once you've been made a solid offer and a start date, you don't have to do anything for your current employer, except stick out the required 2 weeks until quitting. You'll need to decide how to handle her requisition, though; do you plan to simply refuse? Or pretend to do the job, but on your last day, say "So long, sucker!"? What's your strategy?
There's no way my supervisor is getting contacted for a recommendation by the new employer.


I guess what I'll probably do is provide an outline as suggested with links to files and my monthly schedule. I will not however provide step by step instructions so that the next person can just follow along mindlessly. If they can't do the job, they shouldn't be hired.
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Old 05-22-2019, 10:19 AM
 
Location: Greensboro, NC
645 posts, read 241,738 times
Reputation: 1551
Just do the outlined, "Cliff Notes" version and don't sweat it if you can't anything done beyond that.
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Old 05-22-2019, 10:24 AM
 
63 posts, read 33,221 times
Reputation: 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
It's common. As long as you are still working for them, yes they can task you to do this. It's part of the job. Once you're gone us a different matter, but as long as you are getting paid by them.....

And I'm sure you'll get some responses about "sabotaging " what you write. Don't. Your reputation is more important than the temporary satisfaction because people know one another and people talk. They'll think if you're willing to do that to your current company, you'll do it to them too.
Let me say this one more time. This isn't about spite. This isn't because I'm lazy. And I sure as hell wouldn't sabotage them. Even with her horrible micromanaging, I don't dislike my boss personally. I just don't want to work for her anymore. I'm thinking about the massive project this became for my colleague, all the while getting her work done in a very busy time of the month. She was even asked to stay on for an additional week to finish it, which she did. I don't think I'm willing to do that, and I shouldn't feel any shame for that.
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Old 05-22-2019, 10:35 AM
 
Location: Over yonder a piece
3,910 posts, read 4,650,428 times
Reputation: 6247
I created one at my old job because a lot of work was very technical AND the spreadsheets were heavily on formulas and cross-tab functionality. I didn't want to hand them all over and have someone panic upon opening them.

My boss didn't ask me to do it - I did it because it was the right thing to do for the person that would eventually take over the tasks in question.

Thinking about it more though, I've done it for a couple companies I've worked for over the years, all voluntarily.
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Old 05-22-2019, 10:44 AM
 
Location: In a vehicle.
5,030 posts, read 3,217,456 times
Reputation: 8217
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicahgoChicahgo View Post
I am in a background check process with a new company and waiting for the go ahead that everything is clear and it's ok to give my two weeks notice. I have an insane micromanaging supervisor, which is a big part of why I'm leaving. I have a feeling she is going to ask me to put together a manual before I leave detailing step by step everything I do and my schedule. She's done it in the past to a colleague. Have you ever been asked to do this? Did you actually do it? Do you think you owe it to an employer to do this for them? Heck, at this point they're lucky I even give them two weeks notice.
When I left a janitorial job, they had me write up everything I did and how long and such. Since I had a small room, I sat and wrote it out. Then I also wrote out who to trust and who to not trust, I put that information in the third box of can liners. I figured that the new person would find it within the week...
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Old 05-22-2019, 10:44 AM
 
Location: HoCo, MD
4,348 posts, read 7,992,346 times
Reputation: 4759
I've always provided some type of transition plan when I left. However, this looks to be much more than that.

There would be little chance I would provide step by step details on how to do my job (and honestly, you can't really do that for many jobs). If asked, I would recommend that she identify someone that would "fill in" after I leave and I would be happy to work with them. If she insists that I document every step - I'd just say I'll see what I can do. But then provide just a summary as late as possible.

Bottom line - do what you feel is appropriate.
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Old 05-22-2019, 10:51 AM
 
Location: HoCo, MD
4,348 posts, read 7,992,346 times
Reputation: 4759
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
You never know when you might need a reference, It is bad policy to flip your employer off as you walk out the door.
Yes - you don't want to burn bridges. But that doesn't mean you have to do everything asked of you.
And references should be carefully established/managed. You don't just look for them when needed. For the most part, personal references typically come out of deeper business relationships. You're not going to just have them call any supervisor/colleague, especially one that you didn't care for.
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Old 05-22-2019, 11:07 AM
 
Location: Vermont
10,308 posts, read 11,225,495 times
Reputation: 14189
While you're still employed your time is their time, so if they choose to have you spend the time they're paying you for to do a manual, that's your job up until the day you leave.
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Old 05-22-2019, 11:35 AM
 
Location: State of Washington (2016)
3,567 posts, read 2,392,641 times
Reputation: 13857
As many posters have already suggested, just do a brief, basic outline of your duties and reference a resource person they can go to for additional assistance, and leave it at that. If you never received a manual when you started why should you be expected to create one for your successor? Why doesn't HR or your department have some sort of guidelines or a manual already? That is not your responsibility. I would just do my job during the next 2 weeks and leave them with the outline.
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Old 05-22-2019, 12:21 PM
 
6,584 posts, read 2,376,729 times
Reputation: 15137
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicahgoChicahgo View Post
I am in a background check process with a new company and waiting for the go ahead that everything is clear and it's ok to give my two weeks notice. I have an insane micromanaging supervisor, which is a big part of why I'm leaving. I have a feeling she is going to ask me to put together a manual before I leave detailing step by step everything I do and my schedule. She's done it in the past to a colleague. Have you ever been asked to do this? Did you actually do it? Do you think you owe it to an employer to do this for them? Heck, at this point they're lucky I even give them two weeks notice.
I think it all depends how badly you want that last check.


Where I work, I'm pretty sure I'd be expected to do something similar. If I was quitting because I won the lottery...well, they'll just have to figure things out for themselves.


If it's because of a new job, or because I need that last check, than I'll retrain someone else, write up proceduals...whatever they need.
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