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Old 05-24-2019, 01:44 AM
 
Location: Western Washington
8,947 posts, read 8,406,922 times
Reputation: 15551

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Quote:
Originally Posted by k7baixo View Post
My manager asked for six monthís notice when I retire. Yeah...Iíll probably give it to him...from our new location as I live on-site as the new house is being built. Lol
I am sorry that you have worked in an environment where you feel that this is appropriate or justified. My employees typically give me 6-18 months notice of retirement, and the last time a FT employee ghosted me was about 10 years ago.

In turn, I alter their workload so that long term projects wrap up before they leave, their last few weeks are spent on only short term or daily tasks, I can transition by hiring another person as soon as they leave, they know that their jobs are secure and not overloaded, everybody is happy.

I strive to create an environment of mutual respect, because it makes the job easier and more enjoyable for all. I do have a few employees who do not buy into that, and insist on creating an angry, hostile workplace for themselves, but that is their choice, not mine.
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Old 05-24-2019, 05:14 AM
 
3,974 posts, read 1,697,241 times
Reputation: 8103
Quote:
Originally Posted by ocnjgirl View Post
I always left detailed notes for the next person to follow.
Yeah it is really more about the other people you work with than your supervisor. You might also need them as a reference in the future because you never know where they might be or if they could be in a position to help you. If you ghost your employer and leave them with all your work, you can guarantee that wonít happen.
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Old 05-24-2019, 07:40 AM
 
1,510 posts, read 965,094 times
Reputation: 2858
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
When a potential new employer checks your references, they don't call your direct supervisor. They call your personnel department.


The people in personnel haven't worked with you, so where do you think they get their information about you? It comes from the evaluations that they have received from your supervisor.


They might ask to be put in touch with your supervisor.


You really think that employers will only check with the people that you give as references? You don't get to control the process like that.
At least for the past four or five employers I have had - going back into the '90s - references by the company could only be verification of employment, title and dates and perhaps an explanation in general terms of the position and the unit, but never any details about that person or that person's performance. This is policy and seems to be more important to the powers that be than most parts of policy.

Even when we were contacted directly for references, we were not allowed by company policy to give more than that on a reference check. At some point an employer or two ago, that was pushed entirely to HR, who has done the same verify/dates/title.

Not sure if that is common, but seems to be when I have been on the hiring end of the process as well (granted, I do not hire many people).

For many positions, the employment history verification dance is handled by a third party firm.
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Old 05-24-2019, 07:45 AM
 
3,911 posts, read 2,748,478 times
Reputation: 7201
Quote:
Originally Posted by ocnjgirl View Post
I always left detailed notes for the next person to follow.
And it's for the customer's benefit as well. One of our largest suppliers was bought out by another company. Just yesterday I called one of my contacts there and her extension was no longer working. Found out she was now gone but her supervisor went through her detailed notes about our account so she could help me.

I hate that she's gone, but thankful that she was responsible enough after years of working with us to leave notes for the next person.
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Old 05-24-2019, 07:50 AM
 
1,510 posts, read 965,094 times
Reputation: 2858
Quote:
Originally Posted by ocnjgirl View Post
I always left detailed notes for the next person to follow.
Quote:
Originally Posted by RamenAddict View Post
Yeah it is really more about the other people you work with than your supervisor. You might also need them as a reference in the future because you never know where they might be or if they could be in a position to help you. If you ghost your employer and leave them with all your work, you can guarantee that wonít happen.
That's always been my approach to it as well. For the most part in career jobs, I have liked the people I worked with and now work with, so want to make it easier on them in transition. I would do what I could within normal work hours after giving notice to do this while also wrapping up what I can.

Sad when an organization puts the wrong people in leadership positions. All too common, in every facet of society, to promote the unfit-to-be-leader into those positions, who then promote more like themselves.
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Old 05-24-2019, 08:40 AM
 
1,550 posts, read 401,594 times
Reputation: 2896
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicahgoChicahgo View Post
I am in a background check process with a new company and waiting for the go ahead that everything is clear and it's ok to give my two weeks notice. I have an insane micromanaging supervisor, which is a big part of why I'm leaving. I have a feeling she is going to ask me to put together a manual before I leave detailing step by step everything I do and my schedule. She's done it in the past to a colleague. Have you ever been asked to do this? Did you actually do it? Do you think you owe it to an employer to do this for them? Heck, at this point they're lucky I even give them two weeks notice.
When I knew I was going to leave a job, I would start preparing documentation to turn it over along with my notice. People will always remember how you made them feel, and you want them to have good feelings about you. Even if you hated the job, no one is going to remember you had reason to act unprofessionally because you hated the job. All they will remember is how you behaved.

So while you have time at work, just document what you would expect someone else taking over needs to know. Also, make sure your name is in it, because someone else who takes over the job will remember you and be thankful you did this. That person might very well be in a position to recommend you for a job because you took care of business at this one.

Don't worry about the current bad management there. There is no need to feel you must leave them a mess. It will only make you feel bad you did so in the future and it will only hurt you.

At the end of the day, if they are still paying you, you owe them work. Plain and simple. If you were being asked to do this a month after you left the job, that's another story, but now you are employed there and should put your best efforts forward to leave behind a document you'd be glad to put your name on.
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Old 05-24-2019, 08:45 AM
 
1,550 posts, read 401,594 times
Reputation: 2896
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicahgoChicahgo View Post
Yeah...I would never ask my supervisor for a reference....ever. How is giving two weeks notice, but not writing a complete workbook about my job, flipping off my employer? It is also bad policy to micromanage your staff and treat them like 5 year olds.
You are ignoring the big picture here. Anything less than professional acts on your part is going to hurt you. Don't be so short-sighted in worrying about a reference. Also, your boss might end up getting promoted above you at your new company in six months. And what about anyone else you takes over your work, you want them all to think highly of you. Anyone who thinks their actions aren't going to come back to hurt them don't realize how small the industry community you work in actually is.
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Old 05-24-2019, 08:48 AM
 
1,550 posts, read 401,594 times
Reputation: 2896
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicahgoChicahgo View Post
Let me say this one more time. This isn't about spite. This isn't because I'm lazy. And I sure as hell wouldn't sabotage them. Even with her horrible micromanaging, I don't dislike my boss personally. I just don't want to work for her anymore. I'm thinking about the massive project this became for my colleague, all the while getting her work done in a very busy time of the month. She was even asked to stay on for an additional week to finish it, which she did. I don't think I'm willing to do that, and I shouldn't feel any shame for that.
When you give notice, the letter should have your last day there. That's it. No, you aren't available give them more time. That's it.

You don't know the circumstances of the other person that left who may have offered to stay longer if needed when they gave notice.
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Old 05-24-2019, 08:51 AM
 
1,550 posts, read 401,594 times
Reputation: 2896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disgustedman View Post
When I left a janitorial job, they had me write up everything I did and how long and such. Since I had a small room, I sat and wrote it out. Then I also wrote out who to trust and who to not trust, I put that information in the third box of can liners. I figured that the new person would find it within the week...
Cool.

Wow, this sounds like the start of a mystery story. Almost reminds me of how Superman was able to watch interactive videos left by his father when he reached a certain age.
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Old 05-24-2019, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Denver CO
21,177 posts, read 11,780,372 times
Reputation: 32183
I think part of the issue here is that people are not always talking about the same things.

In my field of law, it's customary to do a transfer memo about each case you are handling to leave for the next attorney who will be handling the case. When I've been in jobs that involved handling as a caseload, that's what I did.

But my previous job wasn't handling a caseload and I didn't have individual clients, I managed processes. So when I left that job, I left an outline with the various things I was responsible for, and all the info about where to find things on the shared computer drive, who the contacts were, etc.

What I didn't leave was a narrative about how I accomplished each task, because everyone can have a different approach on how they do things. Plus some of it was things like developing personal relationships over a period of years. You can't give a narrative on how to do that or transfer the relationship itself.
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