U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-24-2019, 10:20 AM
 
20,541 posts, read 16,611,821 times
Reputation: 38561

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by rummage View Post
You are ignoring the big picture here. Anything less than professional acts on your part is going to hurt you. Don't be so short-sighted in worrying about a reference. Also, your boss might end up getting promoted above you at your new company in six months. And what about anyone else you takes over your work, you want them all to think highly of you. Anyone who thinks their actions aren't going to come back to hurt them don't realize how small the industry community you work in actually is.
Itís not just about references either. Iíve worked again for companies I worked at in the past and left. Iíve also run into old bosses st new employers, managers change companies to, and my industry is a small world. I donít think I have any ex-employers who wouldnít hire me back. Why make future options even a little narrower just to be spiteful?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-24-2019, 12:10 PM
 
Location: SNA=>PDX 2013
2,660 posts, read 3,048,788 times
Reputation: 3112
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicahgoChicahgo View Post
I am in a background check process with a new company and waiting for the go ahead that everything is clear and it's ok to give my two weeks notice. I have an insane micromanaging supervisor, which is a big part of why I'm leaving. I have a feeling she is going to ask me to put together a manual before I leave detailing step by step everything I do and my schedule. She's done it in the past to a colleague. Have you ever been asked to do this? Did you actually do it? Do you think you owe it to an employer to do this for them? Heck, at this point they're lucky I even give them two weeks notice.

IMHO, you know what instructions are absolutely needed for the next person. Those you should do. You know which tasks can be overviews, so do that. And you know which part of your job a person should be able to figure out and won't cause any issues if they don't know, then don't do anything for those. FYI stuff, do if you have time. Otherwise, like you, someone will figure it out. You know your job best, do what you can for the next person, but I'm with you, screw the step-by-step instructions for everything.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-24-2019, 02:48 PM
 
Location: S.W. Florida
2,206 posts, read 930,610 times
Reputation: 6228
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicahgoChicahgo View Post
I am in a background check process with a new company and waiting for the go ahead that everything is clear and it's ok to give my two weeks notice. I have an insane micromanaging supervisor, which is a big part of why I'm leaving. I have a feeling she is going to ask me to put together a manual before I leave detailing step by step everything I do and my schedule. She's done it in the past to a colleague. Have you ever been asked to do this? Did you actually do it? Do you think you owe it to an employer to do this for them? Heck, at this point they're lucky I even give them two weeks notice.
Only you can answer this. If you feel you owe it to the company then do it. If not, tell them you will not and expect to be terminated on the spot.

If your supervisor is such a micro manager type, why doesnít she know exactly what you do and how?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-24-2019, 03:41 PM
 
1,859 posts, read 714,806 times
Reputation: 3975
Quote:
Originally Posted by ocnjgirl View Post
It’s not just about references either. I’ve worked again for companies I worked at in the past and left. I’ve also run into old bosses st new employers, managers change companies to, and my industry is a small world. I don’t think I have any ex-employers who wouldn’t hire me back. Why make future options even a little narrower just to be spiteful?
No need to be spiteful, but in my case I would never want to return to the employers that I had left. There are plenty of other potential jobs to go to. When I left them there was no way that I was coming back to any of them, ever.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-24-2019, 05:44 PM
Status: "Loving life, wife and job!" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: USA
996 posts, read 382,712 times
Reputation: 2649
Quote:
Originally Posted by fishbrains View Post
I am sorry that you have worked in an environment where you feel that this is appropriate or justified. My employees typically give me 6-18 months notice of retirement, and the last time a FT employee ghosted me was about 10 years ago.

In turn, I alter their workload so that long term projects wrap up before they leave, their last few weeks are spent on only short term or daily tasks, I can transition by hiring another person as soon as they leave, they know that their jobs are secure and not overloaded, everybody is happy.

I strive to create an environment of mutual respect, because it makes the job easier and more enjoyable for all. I do have a few employees who do not buy into that, and insist on creating an angry, hostile workplace for themselves, but that is their choice, not mine.
Maybe engage your fishbrains before jumping to a conclusion. Lol I love my job and have been with the same company for 34 + years. Since I can work from anywhere in the world, heíll get the six monthsí requested - just from a new workshop on our new acreage. If I didnít like the job or the boss, Iíd cut it much, much shorter!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-25-2019, 02:22 AM
 
6,955 posts, read 3,860,525 times
Reputation: 14779
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueherons View Post
Nope, that is highly illegal for a company not to pay you. Too easy to prove you did work. Plus, they end up having to pay, paying a dollar for dollar for fines, then a dollar for dollar for interest. So that $1000 paycheck costs the company $3000.

I had an employer try and do this to me and were quickly disabused of this idea.

To the OP.

HELL NO!!! Explain that your first priority is to finish your actual job and that if they would like to shadow you for the next two weeks and they write the manual, you would be happy to have them shadow you.

No apologies, no I'm sorry, just no.

Don't offer to help your boss write the manual either. Don't or you will get stuck doing it.

No, nope, no thanks.
If the employee wants to work for those two weeks they will get paid; no one said they would not be paid for work actually performed. The employee's "first priority" is what management decides it will be not the employee. If the departing employee decides they do not like those terms they can leave, and lose the two weeks pay.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-25-2019, 10:47 AM
 
7,380 posts, read 2,924,693 times
Reputation: 12271
Quote:
Originally Posted by ocnjgirl View Post
It’s not just about references either. I’ve worked again for companies I worked at in the past and left. I’ve also run into old bosses st new employers, managers change companies to, and my industry is a small world. I don’t think I have any ex-employers who wouldn’t hire me back. Why make future options even a little narrower just to be spiteful?
Agreed! I remember a particular manager, fresh out of college, who didn't have a clue about many processes of my job. I would wonder how she was giving me suggestions, when those wouldn't work, I already tried that years ago, and she didn't know the end result, I already did. No one appreciated having a younger inexperienced manager thrown into the mix, and most were actually quite uncooperative with her.

I found a better opportunity, put my 2 weeks notice in, and created the manual she suggested. I produced a manual on my last day that I was really proud of. She would be sure to know how much I did, and would have the tools to actually manage my replacement with some knowledge of processes.

Five years later I found a higher paying more exciting job that I applied for, and really wanted. Three rounds of interviews. The background check took 3 weeks. I found out, one of the tasks in the check involved reaching out to previous managers in the last ten years and asking: "Would you hire __ again?" "Please explain your answer." Along with other probing questions. My new employer needed all of this information returned before I was to begin. I didn't know this at the time of application.

My previous manager was still at the same company I left, and called me. She asked: "Are you applying for President of a Bank somewhere? I just received this official looking questionnaire concerning your employment with us. Is it a government job?" No, and yes. I explained what I wanted to do. She advised me that she wrote a lot of positive things, yes she would hire me back and that I was a valuable employee. She wanted to let me know I was always welcome back.

Ethics. They stay with you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-25-2019, 10:51 AM
 
1,859 posts, read 714,806 times
Reputation: 3975
Quote:
Originally Posted by RbccL View Post
Agreed! I remember a particular manager, fresh out of college, who didn't have a clue about many processes of my job. I would wonder how she was giving me suggestions, when those wouldn't work, I already tried that years ago, and she didn't know the end result, I already did. No one appreciated having a younger inexperienced manager thrown into the mix, and most were actually quite uncooperative with her.

I found a better opportunity, put my 2 weeks notice in, and created the manual she suggested. I produced a manual on my last day that I was really proud of. She would be sure to know how much I did, and would have the tools to actually manage my replacement with some knowledge of processes.

Five years later I found a higher paying more exciting job that I applied for, and really wanted. Three rounds of interviews. The background check took 3 weeks. One of the tasks in the check involved reaching out to previous managers and asking: "Would you hire __ again?" "Please explain your answer." Along with other probing questions. My new employer needed all of this information returned before I was to begin. I did know this at the time of application.

My previous manager was still at the same company I left, and called me. She asked: "Are you applying for President of a bank somewhere? I just received this official looking questionnaire concerning your employment with us. Is it a government job?" No, and yes. I explained what I wanted to do. She advised me that she wrote a lot of positive things, yes she would hire me back and that I was a valuable employee. She wanted to let me know I was always welcome back.

Ethics. They stay with you.
Unless the companies that you work for will give you a bad recommendation no matter your performance because you dared to leave their glorious company.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-25-2019, 12:05 PM
 
Location: Full time in the RV
2,867 posts, read 6,404,335 times
Reputation: 2420
OP is the problem the manual is additional work?

or

Is the problem you don't want to help your manager because you don't like him/her?

I can see your point if it is the first one, but OTOH we all have to do jobs we dislike in the work world.

If it is the second one that seems spiteful. If it is that awful why not quit with no notice and avoid the whole scene?

I'm in the camp to not burn bridges.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-25-2019, 12:46 PM
 
20,541 posts, read 16,611,821 times
Reputation: 38561
Quote:
Originally Posted by BusinessManIT View Post
Unless the companies that you work for will give you a bad recommendation no matter your performance because you dared to leave their glorious company.
Iíve never had any employer get angry that I left. I always gave notice, wrapped up my loose ends, and was respectful thanking them for the opportunity to work with them (whether I meant it or not). There was only one job where I really hated the person above me and he was the reason I left...even then I did not unload on him on my way out and I gave notice etc. Not too long after, they fired him, and I went back for another three years.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top