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Old 05-22-2019, 08:35 AM
 
63 posts, read 32,564 times
Reputation: 273

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I am in a background check process with a new company and waiting for the go ahead that everything is clear and it's ok to give my two weeks notice. I have an insane micromanaging supervisor, which is a big part of why I'm leaving. I have a feeling she is going to ask me to put together a manual before I leave detailing step by step everything I do and my schedule. She's done it in the past to a colleague. Have you ever been asked to do this? Did you actually do it? Do you think you owe it to an employer to do this for them? Heck, at this point they're lucky I even give them two weeks notice.
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Old 05-22-2019, 09:43 AM
 
197 posts, read 65,253 times
Reputation: 587
You owe them nothing, if you felt like you did, you'd still want to work there. Unless it's specifically outlined in your job description (it's not), I wouldn't give them the satisfaction. Some people will say to not burn bridges, put on a good showing on your way out, go above and beyond etc. I'm of the belief that you look at for #1, always.
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Old 05-22-2019, 09:51 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
22,654 posts, read 28,660,433 times
Reputation: 43641
You could do an outline. You must know what you do, so write it down. Two weeks is plenty of time. You should be expecting to work for those two weeks and if that is the task assigned, then do it.



I don't see too much difference between that and being asked to train your successor.


Or, it is common to hand in your resignation and to be escorted to the door immediately. Maybe you won't even be there to write a manual.
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Old 05-22-2019, 09:52 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
22,654 posts, read 28,660,433 times
Reputation: 43641
You never know when you might need a reference, It is bad policy to flip your employer off as you walk out the door.
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Old 05-22-2019, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Denver CO
21,155 posts, read 11,754,604 times
Reputation: 32132
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
You could do an outline. You must know what you do, so write it down. Two weeks is plenty of time. You should be expecting to work for those two weeks and if that is the task assigned, then do it.



I don't see too much difference between that and being asked to train your successor.


Or, it is common to hand in your resignation and to be escorted to the door immediately. Maybe you won't even be there to write a manual.
When I left my last job, I did it but not in any very thorough way. I wasn't going to spoon-feed all the work I spent 5 years learning and perfecting to the person who wasn't qualified but got hired over me anyway. So I did the basics in an outline form, but not the details, and left it to them to figure out how to do it. The outline was far more than I had gotten when I started, so they were already being given an advantage I hadn't received.
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Old 05-22-2019, 10:10 AM
 
63 posts, read 32,564 times
Reputation: 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
You could do an outline. You must know what you do, so write it down. Two weeks is plenty of time. You should be expecting to work for those two weeks and if that is the task assigned, then do it.



I don't see too much difference between that and being asked to train your successor.


Or, it is common to hand in your resignation and to be escorted to the door immediately. Maybe you won't even be there to write a manual.
With my colleague, she was asked to provide a step by step guide of exactly how to do her job. It wasn't a guideline, it was a tedious ordeal that took several days. What everyone seems to be missing is that I have a huge workload and just because it will be my final two weeks with the company, that doesn't mean my normal work doesn't also need to get done. I was certainly not provided with any kind of manual when I started. It was figure it out...and I did.
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Old 05-22-2019, 10:13 AM
 
1,665 posts, read 547,450 times
Reputation: 3555
Why wouldn't you? Until your last day, you work for them, do what they want you to do.

What reason would you have to refuse, other than spite?
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Old 05-22-2019, 10:15 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
78,526 posts, read 70,430,585 times
Reputation: 76489
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicahgoChicahgo View Post
I am in a background check process with a new company and waiting for the go ahead that everything is clear and it's ok to give my two weeks notice. I have an insane micromanaging supervisor, which is a big part of why I'm leaving. I have a feeling she is going to ask me to put together a manual before I leave detailing step by step everything I do and my schedule. She's done it in the past to a colleague. Have you ever been asked to do this? Did you actually do it? Do you think you owe it to an employer to do this for them? Heck, at this point they're lucky I even give them two weeks notice.
She won't know you're planning to leave, until she gets called for a recommendation, right? So she won't ask you, until you actually have the job in the bag. Once you've been made a solid offer and a start date, you don't have to do anything for your current employer, except stick out the required 2 weeks until quitting.

You'll need to decide how to handle her request, though; do you plan to simply refuse? Or pretend to do the job, but on your last day, say "So long, sucker!", and walk out without handing over a manual? What's your strategy? I guess you could beg off, saying your workload doesn't allow for the kind of time commitment the task would require.
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Old 05-22-2019, 10:15 AM
 
63 posts, read 32,564 times
Reputation: 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
You never know when you might need a reference, It is bad policy to flip your employer off as you walk out the door.
Yeah...I would never ask my supervisor for a reference....ever. How is giving two weeks notice, but not writing a complete workbook about my job, flipping off my employer? It is also bad policy to micromanage your staff and treat them like 5 year olds.
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Old 05-22-2019, 10:18 AM
 
6,838 posts, read 3,708,603 times
Reputation: 18073
It's common. As long as you are still working for them, yes they can task you to do this. It's part of the job. Once you're gone us a different matter, but as long as you are getting paid by them.....

And I'm sure you'll get some responses about "sabotaging " what you write. Don't. Your reputation is more important than the temporary satisfaction because people know one another and people talk. They'll think if you're willing to do that to your current company, you'll do it to them too.
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