U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-24-2019, 07:36 AM
 
99 posts, read 28,312 times
Reputation: 266

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by GotHereQuickAsICould View Post
However, massage therapists, PITAs, and OTAs don't seem to make all that much money.

Again I think salary is relative to where a person lives and the COL in a particular area. I know from personal experience that massage therapy is a good paying part time job. PTA and OTA aren't 6 figure salaries but they are decent starter jobs in the medical field. A lot of people in the medical field job hop or do the "stepping stone" route. MT to nurse or PTA to PT...that type of thing.

Last edited by BabyBear1234; 05-24-2019 at 07:46 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-24-2019, 07:40 AM
 
38,086 posts, read 14,885,535 times
Reputation: 24522
Quote:
Originally Posted by newtovenice View Post
Take a look at Mike Rowe. He has a whole scholarship fund for trade jobs, some of which can pay a LOT.

A recent FB video he did, he was talking to welders, and you can make 6 figures as a welder. Not immediately, but work your way up. Trades are careers these days in spite of what the rest of the MSM tells you.

Investigate.
MSM has been encouraging trades for years. Parents and schools, not so much.

The problem with trades is that unless you work your way up to owning your own business, relying on manual labor to bring home a paycheck starts getting more difficult in your late forties, early fifties.

The body wears out. Back issues. Rotator cuff problems. ...

Electricians, welders, and other trades that don't rely as much on physical strength can make it longer. But carpenters, plumbers, ironworkers, ... struggle to keep up the pace. Many spend some lean years relying on a spouse to provide income while they get on Disability. Lot of folks on Disability that actually can work, just not at the physically demanding job they did in their twenties and thirties.

Also, construction trades can be seasonal and/or depend on the economy. When the economy is going great, there is lots of jobs. When the economy slacks off, nobody is building.

I worked in the trades and I loved it. But I also realized it was not a long-term gig for me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-24-2019, 07:47 AM
 
38,086 posts, read 14,885,535 times
Reputation: 24522
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobsell View Post
Who cares what jobs don't require a 4 year degree.

Find out what kind of job you'd like. Take the Myers-Briggs test (many free ones online) and find out what personality type you are, then search for "jobs for XXXX" (XXXX = personality type) and research the jobs there.

THEN look for those which don't require a 4 year degree from that data set
I would also suggest going to the nearest community college and ask for vocational testing and counseling.

Interest inventories, vocational aptitude testing, ... Then meet with a counselor to narrow down a list of possibilities that might be a good fit.

Go talk with people doing these jobs. What do they say about the future of this career field? What do they say about the work?

Try some out. Either volunteer, intern, or an entry level position if that's possible.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-24-2019, 07:56 AM
 
17,249 posts, read 10,176,823 times
Reputation: 28762
Here we go again. And again. And again........

Listen, I know the 'trades' has been hyped up ad nauseum both in this forum and in the media. Mostly as a backlash against the "you need any Bachelor's degree to be successful in America" mantra that was pushed by the for profits schools in the late 2000's.

But to repeat for the billionth time, not all of us are either suited for or have any desire to do that kind of work. If you love the trades, fine, more power to you. That doesn't mean it's the ideal job or something everyone should do, anymore than everyone should go to school and become an engineer. I did that 'trades' sort of job in the Navy and I hated it.

Feel me?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-24-2019, 08:27 AM
 
1,506 posts, read 963,291 times
Reputation: 2845
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotHereQuickAsICould View Post
I would also suggest going to the nearest community college and ask for vocational testing and counseling.

Interest inventories, vocational aptitude testing, ... Then meet with a counselor to narrow down a list of possibilities that might be a good fit.

Go talk with people doing these jobs. What do they say about the future of this career field? What do they say about the work?

Try some out. Either volunteer, intern, or an entry level position if that's possible.
Two-year schools - technical and community colleges - are often the places local industry looks first when they know there will be a big need coming up.

Because the two-year schools are very, very good at pulling in people to teach (often from the companies for the specific technical area, but also from other schools), people to design the courses and programs, possible funding (private and public), etc. to put together short customized training (for a company) or courses, certificate and degree programs in a hurry to fit that need. Here, programs for wind and solar energy installation/maintenance are in high gear due to the local utilities' long-term plans; brewing (lots of breweries popping up here); a lot of healthcare.

Worth a check if you have one close to you ... they tend to know what is hot but what is also coming in the near future for careers in your area.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-24-2019, 08:28 AM
 
1,541 posts, read 399,025 times
Reputation: 2882
Quote:
Originally Posted by Motion View Post
What are some of the highest paying professions that don't require 4 years of college?
Start your own business. There are many business owners that are wealthy who don't have a college degree.

But I have to tell you. There are people who will spend decades complaining about not being able to get the job they want because they don't have a degree, when if they worked on the degree one course at a time they would have finished it long ago. In other words, I wouldn't advise anyone to craft their life in avoiding education.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-24-2019, 12:15 PM
 
Location: 60630
12,245 posts, read 17,986,322 times
Reputation: 11674
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
NONE of these careers require a four year college degree.



Radiological tech (X ray tech)- 18 months at a hospital affiliated training school. - $59,540
(may require an associate degree at some point, or in some states)






.

Most states I think require an AS degree or hospital program to become an radiologic technologist.
I graduated 2 years ago myself. However, a handful of states don't require you to be registered or licensed. That will likely change soon. Illinois require a 2 year degree or hospital program, as well as license and registered through ARRT.

Then, once you have your basic X-Ray degree, you can continue your education and become an CT or MRI tech. That's considered a second modality once you already have a degree in xray, and you don't have to go to school again.
But many people choose to take a 2-3 semester course for CT or 1 year certificate for MRI in an actual school. Myself, I chose ASRT, online 16 credit hour course and then I cross train at work for my clinical requirements.

But pay is ok.


My husband has a certificate and a license, aircraft dispatcher, and he makes over a 100 a year, base pay. But that is working for a major airline.
He loves it but he is an aviation nerd so. lol

Last edited by glass_of_merlot; 05-24-2019 at 12:26 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-24-2019, 12:20 PM
 
17,655 posts, read 4,055,214 times
Reputation: 5586
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotHereQuickAsICould View Post
Yep. Oil field work pays good.

One of the better jobs paying is inspecting newly installed oil pipelines to ensure that the interior coating meets specs.

It requires experience, short-term training and certification, plus a willingness to travel but the pay is damn good. Low to mid-six figures if you know how to hustle jobs.
Thanks.....yes it does pay well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-24-2019, 12:40 PM
 
1,091 posts, read 627,721 times
Reputation: 1965
Learn the trades. All of them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-24-2019, 01:45 PM
 
10,058 posts, read 4,648,803 times
Reputation: 15280
Quote:
Originally Posted by C24L View Post
Thanks.....yes it does pay well.
Not so much at the entry jobs, the high pay is directly a result of the long hours and overtime

You could do that working most jobs for 12-16 hours per shift
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top