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Old 06-04-2019, 09:59 AM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
10,781 posts, read 10,189,641 times
Reputation: 14312

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MissLizzie85 View Post
Are you serious? Women taking time to pump breastmilk for a "reasonable time" is covered by federal law. It's a right - she actually is "entitled" to it. And yes, a reasonable time is up to 30 minutes every 2-3 hours. It is not an option to pump - it's a medical necessity. If new mothers DON'T take the time to pump or breastfeed, they'll end up with mastitis, an infection that causes high fever, abscesses, and sometimes hospitalization. It's not like your co-worker was lounging around in a hammock smoking a cigarette on her breaks.

If your employer wasn't hassling her about clocking in and out, why are you? Why do you think that she has to stay late (meaning that she'd probably incur late fees from daycare) to make up for the time that she was hooked up to a breast pump out of necessity?

Breastfeeding is a temporary state and necessitates temporary accommodations. I am honestly shocked at the complete lack of empathy for other human beings I'm seeing from some on this thread. Does that same selfishness extend to other forms of workplace accommodation? What if someone has multiple sclerosis and needs additional breaks? What about someone with vision problems who can't stare at a screen for more than and hour or two at a time? Would we complain about a co-worker with cancer who needs to take significant time off for chemotherapy and recovery? This is why the US is full of overworked and miserable people... we're so quick to think of people as employees before thinking of them as human beings.
I, too, had a WTF moment when I read that post, but then what do you expect from a 60 year old childless woman. I breastfed both of my children while working outside of the home - at a global law firm to boot - and I sure did take breaks and didn't clock out for a single one of them. Do you think the office smokers clocked out for their frequent nicotine hits? Smart people in HR know better than to step on that landmine by mandating that employees clock out for pump breaks. Why stop at that? Go ahead and make people clock out for office socializing. I've seen people away from their desks for at least fifteen minutes "making the office rounds". Do you think these people stay later? Give me a damn break.

Back to the subject at hand, if the woman the OP is referring to is a single mom, then she has no choice but to use her leave time. How and when she uses her leave time is up to her. She can take it as she pleases. I don't know about you, but I'd rather use my leave time for myself than having to stay home with a sick child.

Is she in fact lazy? is her work product subpar? that's a different thing entirely and if she is using kids as justification than that's not right. But if this is yet another disgruntled coworker who bitterly complains about the unfair "advantage" that working parents (specifically mom because I'm sure if the person is male there wouldn't be an issue) have then you'll have no sympathy here. It's not easy being a working parent, especially a single working parent. I have a husband, so we can juggle who gets to stay home with the sick kid, etc. But there are many single parents out there and they need to earn a living too. Their foremost responsibility though should be their kid(s) and that is expected. If the bus is late, they will have to see that their kid gets to school. there was one nasty spate of kid illnesses (different strains of the flu hitting both kids) that my husband and I had to deal with, so leave time needed to be used.

How about this? Maybe companies should allow more people to work from home/remotely so that productivity is not affected by necessary life events. Employers restrict who can work remotely and as a result there will be work missed.

Now if this woman is a certified slacker and this shows up in her evaluation, then that needs to be addressed by her supervisor(s).
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Old 06-04-2019, 10:01 AM
 
325 posts, read 395,196 times
Reputation: 671
Very few things in life seems to bring anger faster than insinuating that "pumping" isn't #1 priority.

Anyways, the point that the previous person made is that the 30 minutes isn't being made up and therefore directly affecting the mother's co-workers. The work has to be done, right?

Personally, I don't care if my co-workers pump milk, walk to Starbucks for a latte, go to the gym, pick up their kids early from school, go on a 2 hours lunch, come in late and leave early, etc. As long as it's not affecting me and anyone else, do what you want. More employers and other employees should encourage this idea, as it provide incentives for workers to find better ways to do their tasks so that they can have some free time during the day to do enjoyable things at the office. That said.. there will always be co-workers that can't help but judge others so...... it's a difficult change for most places.


Quote:
Originally Posted by MissLizzie85 View Post
Are you serious? Women taking time to pump breastmilk for a "reasonable time" is covered by federal law. It's a right - she actually is "entitled" to it. And yes, a reasonable time is up to 30 minutes every 2-3 hours. It is not an option to pump - it's a medical necessity. If new mothers DON'T take the time to pump or breastfeed, they'll end up with mastitis, an infection that causes high fever, abscesses, and sometimes hospitalization. It's not like your co-worker was lounging around in a hammock smoking a cigarette on her breaks.

If your employer wasn't hassling her about clocking in and out, why are you? Why do you think that she has to stay late (meaning that she'd probably incur late fees from daycare) to make up for the time that she was hooked up to a breast pump out of necessity?

Breastfeeding is a temporary state and necessitates temporary accommodations. I am honestly shocked at the complete lack of empathy for other human beings I'm seeing from some on this thread. Does that same selfishness extend to other forms of workplace accommodation? What if someone has multiple sclerosis and needs additional breaks? What about someone with vision problems who can't stare at a screen for more than and hour or two at a time? Would we complain about a co-worker with cancer who needs to take significant time off for chemotherapy and recovery? This is why the US is full of overworked and miserable people... we're so quick to think of people as employees before thinking of them as human beings.
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Old 06-04-2019, 10:12 AM
 
987 posts, read 301,267 times
Reputation: 2156
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissLizzie85 View Post
Are you serious? Women taking time to pump breastmilk for a "reasonable time" is covered by federal law. It's a right - she actually is "entitled" to it. And yes, a reasonable time is up to 30 minutes every 2-3 hours. It is not an option to pump - it's a medical necessity. If new mothers DON'T take the time to pump or breastfeed, they'll end up with mastitis, an infection that causes high fever, abscesses, and sometimes hospitalization. It's not like your co-worker was lounging around in a hammock smoking a cigarette on her breaks.
Just being very frank here. . . .

Breastfeeding is an option. Many women chose to breastfeed or use a bottle or use both. This is a personal decision.

Mastitis or not, all women stop breastfeeding. Stop the drama.

If a person takes, a 30 minute break every 2.5 hours. If this person works 9 to 5, 8 hours a day assuming no lunch. Then from 9 to 10:30, is work - from 10:30 to 11 is break, 11 to 12:30 is work, 12:30 to 1 is break, 1 to 2:30 is work, 2:30 to 3 is break, 3 to 4:30 is work and 4:30 to 5 is break. Conservatively, this is two hours a day (without lunch) which is off limits. With lunch, it is three hours a day of lost work time and at that point, why bother working?

In some business, this is acceptable and in some, it's a real hardship.

My husband already worked long hours so I could stay home with our children. I would be angry at someone who expected my husband to work even longer hours for their personal decisions.

Sorry.
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Old 06-04-2019, 10:56 AM
 
Location: OHIO
2,353 posts, read 1,079,067 times
Reputation: 5398
The average worker, pumping or not,is not productive the entire 8 hours they are at work.

Idc if someone is watching a movie as long as their work is done and nothing extra falls on ME.
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Old 06-04-2019, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Where rhotic consonants are either absent or intrusive
8,903 posts, read 5,237,696 times
Reputation: 14605
Quote:
Originally Posted by YorktownGal View Post
Just being very frank here. . . .

Breastfeeding is an option. Many women chose to breastfeed or use a bottle or use both. This is a personal decision.

Mastitis or not, all women stop breastfeeding. Stop the drama.

If a person takes, a 30 minute break every 2.5 hours. If this person works 9 to 5, 8 hours a day assuming no lunch. Then from 9 to 10:30, is work - from 10:30 to 11 is break, 11 to 12:30 is work, 12:30 to 1 is break, 1 to 2:30 is work, 2:30 to 3 is break, 3 to 4:30 is work and 4:30 to 5 is break. Conservatively, this is two hours a day (without lunch) which is off limits. With lunch, it is three hours a day of lost work time and at that point, why bother working?

In some business, this is acceptable and in some, it's a real hardship.

My husband already worked long hours so I could stay home with our children. I would be angry at someone who expected my husband to work even longer hours for their personal decisions.

Sorry.
Not really. Assuming the woman even needs to pump every 2.5 hours for a full 30 minutes (some do, some don't), she can arrange her breaks (lunch break and 2 paid 15-minute breaks) to coincide with her pumping time.
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Old 06-04-2019, 11:30 AM
 
987 posts, read 301,267 times
Reputation: 2156
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ginge McFantaPants View Post
Not really. Assuming the woman even needs to pump every 2.5 hours for a full 30 minutes (some do, some don't), she can arrange her breaks (lunch break and 2 paid 15-minute breaks) to coincide with her pumping time.
Yes, it is still not the full two hours needed.

I've never had a job where anyone got two paid 15 minute breaks. I also never worked in an office where people could disappear for two hours or take two lunch breaks. I had to be available for client calls so a 30 lunch break felt like a luxury.

I feel like I've worked in a parallel universe.
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Old 06-04-2019, 11:32 AM
 
6,324 posts, read 3,470,141 times
Reputation: 5729
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ginge McFantaPants View Post
Not really. Assuming the woman even needs to pump every 2.5 hours for a full 30 minutes (some do, some don't), she can arrange her breaks (lunch break and 2 paid 15-minute breaks) to coincide with her pumping time.
That's the assumption I would take with respect to reasonable accommodation. Not that she pumps, takes a break, works for a while, pumps, takes an hour long lunch, pumps, works for a while, takes a break and then goes home.

A responsible worker will minimize the impact any such accommodation makes on the employer. An irresponsible one will take full advantage. No different in many ways than the "smoke breaks" many used to take when smoking at the workplace was much more acceptable.

While nursing is usually temporary, some women choose to breastfeed for 1-2+ years. That's a lot of pumping, and tough to accommodate.
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Old 06-04-2019, 11:32 AM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
10,781 posts, read 10,189,641 times
Reputation: 14312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ginge McFantaPants View Post
Not really. Assuming the woman even needs to pump every 2.5 hours for a full 30 minutes (some do, some don't), she can arrange her breaks (lunch break and 2 paid 15-minute breaks) to coincide with her pumping time.
Yea, it didn't take me 30 minutes to pump. You get yourself one of those hospital grade pumps and you can express milk in as little as fifteen minutes. No different than the smokers or the office social butterflies.

The key is being flexible. I never had rigid times to pump. Obviously, if I was in the middle of something pressing, I delayed the pump break.

I believe in "you scratch my back, I scratch your back". For years I regularly worked overtime and put in the sweat equity, so that when I did have children, my bosses were very accommodating.
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Old 06-04-2019, 11:34 AM
 
6,324 posts, read 3,470,141 times
Reputation: 5729
Quote:
Originally Posted by YorktownGal View Post
Yes, it is still not the full two hours needed.

I've never had a job where anyone got two paid 15 minute breaks. I also never worked in an office where people could disappear for two hours or take two lunch breaks. I had to be available for client calls so a 30 lunch break felt like a luxury.

I feel like I've worked in a parallel universe.
Do you work a salaried or hourly paid job?

I've worked salaried for the past 25+ years and the expectation was always pretty much be available anytime. But I'd also put in 50-60+ hour weeks on average, with up to 80 during certain times. Never encountered formal "lunch" or "break" times either.
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Old 06-04-2019, 11:35 AM
 
Location: Where rhotic consonants are either absent or intrusive
8,903 posts, read 5,237,696 times
Reputation: 14605
Quote:
Originally Posted by YorktownGal View Post
Yes, it is still not the full two hours needed.

I've never had a job where anyone got two paid 15 minute breaks. I also never worked in an office where people could disappear for two hours or take two lunch breaks. I had to be available for client calls so a 30 lunch break felt like a luxury.

I feel like I've worked in a parallel universe.
Again, you're assuming she even needs 2 full hours. One of my co-workers currently pumps. She only pumps twice during the workday, once session of which is during her lunch break.
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