U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-04-2019, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Denver CO
21,158 posts, read 11,761,610 times
Reputation: 32132

Advertisements

Well, since some of us had to pump in a restroom, I hope no one objects to the fact that I chose to not eat my lunch in there while pumping.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-04-2019, 11:38 AM
 
Location: Where rhotic consonants are either absent or intrusive
8,903 posts, read 5,232,440 times
Reputation: 14597
Quote:
Originally Posted by markjames68 View Post
That's the assumption I would take with respect to reasonable accommodation. Not that she pumps, takes a break, works for a while, pumps, takes an hour long lunch, pumps, works for a while, takes a break and then goes home.

A responsible worker will minimize the impact any such accommodation makes on the employer. An irresponsible one will take full advantage. No different in many ways than the "smoke breaks" many used to take when smoking at the workplace was much more acceptable.

While nursing is usually temporary, some women choose to breastfeed for 1-2+ years. That's a lot of pumping, and tough to accommodate.
FLSA only covers the first year after birth; the employee is not required to accommodate her after that. Plus, once the baby is older, its highly unlikely she would need to pump as often as during the first year.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-04-2019, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
10,769 posts, read 10,176,929 times
Reputation: 14284
Quote:
Originally Posted by markjames68 View Post
That's the assumption I would take with respect to reasonable accommodation. Not that she pumps, takes a break, works for a while, pumps, takes an hour long lunch, pumps, works for a while, takes a break and then goes home.

A responsible worker will minimize the impact any such accommodation makes on the employer. An irresponsible one will take full advantage. No different in many ways than the "smoke breaks" many used to take when smoking at the workplace was much more acceptable.

While nursing is usually temporary, some women choose to breastfeed for 1-2+ years. That's a lot of pumping, and tough to accommodate.
I expressed milk for two years for kid one and two years for kid 2. I work at a top shelf law firm, in litigation (now THAT is hectic). We managed just fine. There was ZERO issue on the employer side. Because I was (and still am) a responsible worker, I didn't adhere to a pump schedule, I took them when I could. I tried to stretch them out. If I was preparing for a hearing, obviously I didn't drop everything to pump. But I still took breaks and for my child, it was worth it. I'd do it again. As I said, after being there for many years, I didn't have to prove anything. They knew what I was made of and what type of worker that I was.

Back in the day, I had to pump in basically a closet and I got walked in on twice. Nowadays, things are far different and companies are more than willing to accommodate working moms without penalty.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-04-2019, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
10,769 posts, read 10,176,929 times
Reputation: 14284
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ginge McFantaPants View Post
FLSA only covers the first year after birth; the employee is not required to accommodate her after that. Plus, once the baby is older, its highly unlikely she would need to pump as often as during the first year.
Right. As the child ages, the frequency of the breaks goes down. It got down to maybe two at one years of age, and then one break a day during toddlerhood. It's been a while (my youngest is now 8), but at over a year, it was probably one break that tapered to zero.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-04-2019, 12:09 PM
 
3,247 posts, read 844,077 times
Reputation: 3763
Quote:
Originally Posted by Surfer Guy View Post
There's a woman I work with now who comes in late at least once a week, running later on the days when the boss isn't around of course (half an hour to one hour on some days), and whenever she gets new leave time at the beginning of each month, she will take all of it within that month. I worked on a project with her recently as a quasi-supervisor but I'm not really her boss, and I asked her why she was out so much. Her response was "I have kids. You're single, so that is why you can save your leave."

All of her kids are in school and she only has three. The excuses are always along the lines of "Robert missed the bus this morning, so I'm running late", "John has soccer practice this afternoon so I need to take off," etc.

This same woman also chats on her phone for much of the day and has tried to pawn off her work on me. I think she's just lazy, but I have encountered the "I have kids" excuse from other women at jobs in the past.
I think this is a great opportunity for your company to enforce (or develop) its attendance policy. Depending if you're customer-facing or not, the missed time should, at the very least, be accounted for in some way. Time-for-time (staying late on days you arrive late) or have it come out of PTO.

Or. Just. Change. Her. Schedule.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-04-2019, 12:24 PM
 
1,506 posts, read 963,291 times
Reputation: 2845
Quote:
Originally Posted by sas318 View Post
I work in the family business and despite the low pay, the freedom to do what I want without consequences is why I'm still there.

I don't know how parents who start new jobs can talk their boss into a flexible schedule. I'd feel crummy about it, like I was lazy (which I definitely am not).
Negotiation is part of the hiring process. Sometimes that includes negotiating flex time.

But in no way does it mean someone is lazy, just shifting tasks and hours to do the job with the boss' approval.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-04-2019, 01:02 PM
 
6,261 posts, read 3,451,115 times
Reputation: 5700
Quote:
Originally Posted by riaelise View Post
I expressed milk for two years for kid one and two years for kid 2. I work at a top shelf law firm, in litigation (now THAT is hectic). We managed just fine. There was ZERO issue on the employer side. Because I was (and still am) a responsible worker, I didn't adhere to a pump schedule, I took them when I could. I tried to stretch them out. If I was preparing for a hearing, obviously I didn't drop everything to pump. But I still took breaks and for my child, it was worth it. I'd do it again. As I said, after being there for many years, I didn't have to prove anything. They knew what I was made of and what type of worker that I was.

Back in the day, I had to pump in basically a closet and I got walked in on twice. Nowadays, things are far different and companies are more than willing to accommodate working moms without penalty.
Your reasoning is what I referred to - you looked at accommodation as exactly that...accommodation. Not an excuse. Most professional women that I know who choose to breastfeed do the same. Sometimes unplanned, but rarely any sort of noticeable impact.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-04-2019, 01:03 PM
 
6,261 posts, read 3,451,115 times
Reputation: 5700
Quote:
Originally Posted by emm74 View Post
Well, since some of us had to pump in a restroom, I hope no one objects to the fact that I chose to not eat my lunch in there while pumping.
No, but I wouldn't be surprised if you then ate lunch at your desk while doing email or some other work.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-04-2019, 01:27 PM
 
601 posts, read 201,677 times
Reputation: 1827
I can't even with this thread.

I pumped for each of my 3 children. I worked 10 hour days to make up for the pumping "breaks" which, btw, can hardly be considered breaks when you're stuck in some back room with no lock on the door with very sensitive body parts attached to a machine and praying to get that last ounce you need for tomorrow, when you get to do it all over again.

And I have NEVER heard of a woman getting a bigger paycheck "because she has a family." Google the mommy tax, and look at how many of your female coworkers have been passed over for promotions/opportunities because they have kids. (Strange enough, fathers don't have this issue.)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-04-2019, 01:32 PM
 
Location: Dallas, TX
268 posts, read 715,349 times
Reputation: 378
The point is, it's just not that hard to accommodate employees within reason. PLENTY of people sit at their desk doing not much at all or spend too much time visiting with co-workers - no one really works a solid 8 hours at an office job, with or without kids. I'm a working parent myself and I've employed working parents. I could not care less if someone leaves early from a salaried position, as long as they've done their work. Why should I force someone to miss their kid's soccer game to sit at their desk for two hours when they've already accomplished what they needed to accomplish for the day? People are much more loyal to your company and are much better employees when you trust them to do a good job without micromanaging them at every turn. The whole policy of PTO and vacation makes no sense and rewards busy work.

Treat people like humans, mind your own business if your coworker's schedule is merely an annoyance to you (providing you're just irritated and not saddled with their projects), and do your work in an efficient way. If someone isn't finishing their assignments on the regular, then they should lose their job. It's not that difficult.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top