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Old 06-03-2019, 10:12 AM
 
Location: Chandler, AZ
2,418 posts, read 1,212,273 times
Reputation: 5653

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Returning2USA View Post
You're leaving for reason.

Sounds like a disaster.

You are not obligated to tell them why.

But you should.

Be direct; be sincere.

Font worry. Don't be too nice.

That is a weakness.
What value would that bring to me?

If I really thought they cared about my input, I'd bring it up before I was at the point of quitting. Either I believed it wouldn't do any good, or I tried and failed.

Either way, when I'm quitting, I'm done. I'm over it. I'm leaving. I'm not going to expend more cycles worrying about them and their problems. I'm going to do my job for the last two weeks, collect my check, and go.
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Old 06-03-2019, 05:08 PM
 
34 posts, read 10,339 times
Reputation: 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by SOON2BNSURPRISE View Post
One year at this job? You have another job that you are leaving for. After a few years this one year job will be a small footnote. After 10 years it shouldn't be on your resume.

You can turn in your notice and walk away no problems.

Or you can turn in your notice and let them know that they have a problem at this location. Realize that their problem is not your problem.

I prefer to walk away.
GREAT mindset thank you!!! I’m still early on in my career, so percent to total, a year is big to me now, but in 10, you’re right. It won’t matter. Thanks.
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Old 06-03-2019, 05:56 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,128 posts, read 16,213,700 times
Reputation: 12755
Up to you. I've always just been honest in exit interviews. If I want to negotiate staying I do so before handing in my notice but it doesn't sound like you want to stay for an increase in salary or if some aspects of the job change so I'd just hand in my notice. If they want to do an exit interview, they'll do an exit interview. It's not a personal thing. Employers have people quit all the time. Often times they want to know why as it's in their interests to have a good work environment so people don't quit. But that's not what a resignation letter is for. Name, date you're quitting, brief thank you for the job, short sweet and done. The details are for the exit interview.
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Old 06-04-2019, 08:57 AM
 
Location: Living on the Coast in Oxnard CA
15,809 posts, read 26,930,946 times
Reputation: 20476
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chelsov View Post
GREAT mindset thank you!!! I’m still early on in my career, so percent to total, a year is big to me now, but in 10, you’re right. It won’t matter. Thanks.
At this stage of your career you have the ability to make choices that you can easily recover from with plenty of time. While is is noble to consider your employer, realize that your choices are all about you and where you want to end up. Something that may help is to develop a plan for the future. Goals that you can achieve within your career. If a company does not fit your plan, then that will give you the motivation or the idea that you need to make a change.

The amazing thing about this is that we seldom have to worry about the direction of a business that we do not have an ownership stake in. Former employers will bring in other people to take our place. Always build contacts. Always keep connected to others in your field. Never burn a bridge. Something that I also learned, sometimes the person that is way below your pay grade may become your boss someday. Someday you may become the boss of someone that is above your pay grade. Build working relationships with everyone and always act in a professional manner and you will be fine.
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Old 06-04-2019, 09:02 AM
 
6,516 posts, read 3,595,568 times
Reputation: 5979
Quote:
Originally Posted by SOON2BNSURPRISE View Post
At this stage of your career you have the ability to make choices that you can easily recover from with plenty of time. While is is noble to consider your employer, realize that your choices are all about you and where you want to end up. Something that may help is to develop a plan for the future. Goals that you can achieve within your career. If a company does not fit your plan, then that will give you the motivation or the idea that you need to make a change.

The amazing thing about this is that we seldom have to worry about the direction of a business that we do not have an ownership stake in. Former employers will bring in other people to take our place. Always build contacts. Always keep connected to others in your field. Never burn a bridge. Something that I also learned, sometimes the person that is way below your pay grade may become your boss someday. Someday you may become the boss of someone that is above your pay grade. Build working relationships with everyone and always act in a professional manner and you will be fine.
Also at this career stage the motivation for staying and the ability to effect change is low.

Once you climb the ladder and get to a senior position there is more opportunity to have role created for you to stay or to actually provide feedback that gets acted upon.

And I agree - never, ever burn bridges. All the more reason to keep the reason for resigning simple. No posts on Facebook or elsewhere slamming the employer. Just politely give notice and move on.
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Old 06-04-2019, 09:04 AM
 
6,516 posts, read 3,595,568 times
Reputation: 5979
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
Up to you. I've always just been honest in exit interviews. If I want to negotiate staying I do so before handing in my notice but it doesn't sound like you want to stay for an increase in salary or if some aspects of the job change so I'd just hand in my notice. If they want to do an exit interview, they'll do an exit interview. It's not a personal thing. Employers have people quit all the time. Often times they want to know why as it's in their interests to have a good work environment so people don't quit. But that's not what a resignation letter is for. Name, date you're quitting, brief thank you for the job, short sweet and done. The details are for the exit interview.
Exit interviews have a way of backfiring though. If HR shares it with the manager it can impact things like being flagged for no-rehire or losing a future reference. Usually if the employee leaves due to poor management the best approach is to just say “new opportunity to use my skills” or “relocating closer to family”.
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Old 06-04-2019, 07:45 PM
 
34 posts, read 10,339 times
Reputation: 95
Thanks all! I did it. My manager wasn’t pleased, however everyone else I spoke with, has been very supportive, agreeing it’s time to go.
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Old 06-04-2019, 07:50 PM
 
724 posts, read 337,502 times
Reputation: 1555
Congrats! Best of success in your new job!
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Old 06-05-2019, 06:23 PM
 
2,534 posts, read 739,077 times
Reputation: 3524
Do you have another job lined up?

If not, DO NOT QUIT YET.

Employers discriminate against people who are out of work, especially if they quit their last job.

Do a stealth job search while you're still employed, you're a "passive candidate" and recruiters will trip over themselves to talk to you.
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Old 06-06-2019, 09:32 AM
 
8,231 posts, read 5,393,427 times
Reputation: 9453
Quote:
Originally Posted by SOON2BNSURPRISE View Post
One year at this job? You have another job that you are leaving for. After a few years this one year job will be a small footnote. After 10 years it shouldn't be on your resume.

You can turn in your notice and walk away no problems.

Or you can turn in your notice and let them know that they have a problem at this location. Realize that their problem is not your problem.

I prefer to walk away.

My dad on the other hand:

My dad left his last job to retire back in 2001. Prior to leaving he wrote a letter to his VP that filtered up to the CEO. He informed them about what was wrong with the division and how they may want to make changes to fix the problem. He was on his way out and did not care at this point. Many of the things that he wrote about were problem areas that the business could be held liable for. They were things that my dad spent several years fixing and these things were never resolved. The problems kept coming back. Unfortunately the C suite did not care to fix anything. My dad retired within a month. By 2007 this company, a nationwide banking conglomerate, was investigated for doing the things that my dad said they needed to fix.
Seems like the people on the top were benefiting from whatever scam that bank was doing.
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