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Old 06-08-2019, 05:45 AM
 
Location: Vermont
1,392 posts, read 468,985 times
Reputation: 2055

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If you don't want to be available, close your office door. I don't see asking for directions in a poorly marked office space as all that egregious.
You have a problem with signage in your office. Initiate a discussion and fix that problem.
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Old 06-08-2019, 06:20 AM
 
701 posts, read 256,675 times
Reputation: 1827
Quote:
Originally Posted by emm74 View Post
I work on a medical campus in an office suite that has a mix of private offices and cubicle workstations. There is no reception area. As it happens, there are people from 4 different departments of this same employer, sharing this space. There is a sign at the front door of the suite that details who works here, but it's admittedly not the most obvious thing in the world that we are spread between so many different departments.

Someone just poked their head into my office to say that they were here for a meeting with a different person who happens to be in an office on the other side of the suite. I looked blankly at him, point him back across the office suite and said "that person's office is over there." He said oh, no one was over there.

So a) what am I supposed to do about that, and b) isn't it somewhat rude to interrupt a person working in a private office with the assumption that they can help you with what is essentially a receptionist question, never mind that I don't even work in the same department.

I'm in a private office which, as in most workplaces these days, are limited to people who are typically in a higher level position especially in a work area where some people are in cubicles but others aren't. Am I being elitist to think that someone should realize that people with private offices are not fair game to interrupt just because the person they came to see doesn't happen to be in their own office?
Shut your door. If your office is cold, have your maintenance man to buy a heater for you. If your office is hot, have your maintenance man to buy a portable air conditioner or a fan for you. Put a sign on your door saying "I'm a VIP. I have lots of important things to do. I'm always very busy. Do not disturb or interrupt at anytime. If you have any questions or need help, go to find a receptionist or somebody who can help you. Period."
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Old 06-08-2019, 06:58 AM
 
6,867 posts, read 3,733,857 times
Reputation: 18127
Let's cut to the chase. A private office does not confer a level of superiority that says people can't talk to you without permission. That doesn't happen until you get to the point of having an inner and outer office with a personal receptionist whose job it is to act as moat dragon between you and the great unwashed.

I have a private office. It happens to be near the door of our secured building. Everyday people come to our building for everything from group meetings to changing the lights. It's routine that they will pop their head in and ask where someone is or where some room is. I will happily tell them or if needed even get up and walk them to where they need to be or page the person they need to see.

Because it's the right thing to do. The fact that I am a manager and that I have an office does not elevate me above anyone who comes in our building. Everyone there has a job to do and the workplace runs smoother when we work together.
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Old 06-08-2019, 07:12 AM
Status: "could've~would've~should've used 'have', not 'of'" (set 27 days ago)
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
10,512 posts, read 14,350,116 times
Reputation: 23389
Quote:
Originally Posted by rummage View Post
No reason to be mad at anyone. You can't be at your desk 24/7, and it would be stupid to talk to them about it that you OP was mad. Just pouring more gas on a bad fire of an attitude here.
If someone arranges a meeting it's not unreasonable to expect them to be at their desk at the appointed time, so yes, I think the OP has a legitimate reason to be mildly annoyed at her co-worker for creating this incident, by not being where she was supposed to be.
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Old 06-08-2019, 07:46 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,213 posts, read 54,678,928 times
Reputation: 66712
This is such a small, insignificant thing. What do you do when real problems arise?
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Old 06-08-2019, 08:05 AM
 
3,764 posts, read 3,508,882 times
Reputation: 8938
My wife does that to me all the time.

I work from home, and she's always coming in my home office and asking questions like "Will you put eggs on the shopping list?" or "How do I change my ring tone, again?"

We have a rule -- when I'm working, I'm NOT HOME and can't answer random questions. But does that stop her?
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Old 06-08-2019, 08:42 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
22,583 posts, read 24,180,850 times
Reputation: 49075
Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
Let's cut to the chase. A private office does not confer a level of superiority that says people can't talk to you without permission. That doesn't happen until you get to the point of having an inner and outer office with a personal receptionist whose job it is to act as moat dragon between you and the great unwashed.

I have a private office. It happens to be near the door of our secured building. Everyday people come to our building for everything from group meetings to changing the lights. It's routine that they will pop their head in and ask where someone is or where some room is. I will happily tell them or if needed even get up and walk them to where they need to be or page the person they need to see.

Because it's the right thing to do. The fact that I am a manager and that I have an office does not elevate me above anyone who comes in our building. Everyone there has a job to do and the workplace runs smoother when we work together.
I work in an office area with three other colleagues. All of our names are on the outside door, but we regularly get people popping their heads in asking, "Is X here?" X is obviously not listed on the door, but it's no skin off my nose to direct them down the hall.
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Old 06-08-2019, 11:33 AM
 
20,648 posts, read 16,680,404 times
Reputation: 38816
Quote:
Originally Posted by emm74 View Post
I work on a medical campus in an office suite that has a mix of private offices and cubicle workstations. There is no reception area. As it happens, there are people from 4 different departments of this same employer, sharing this space. There is a sign at the front door of the suite that details who works here, but it's admittedly not the most obvious thing in the world that we are spread between so many different departments.

Someone just poked their head into my office to say that they were here for a meeting with a different person who happens to be in an office on the other side of the suite. I looked blankly at him, point him back across the office suite and said "that person's office is over there." He said oh, no one was over there.

So a) what am I supposed to do about that, and b) isn't it somewhat rude to interrupt a person working in a private office with the assumption that they can help you with what is essentially a receptionist question, never mind that I don't even work in the same department.

I'm in a private office which, as in most workplaces these days, are limited to people who are typically in a higher level position especially in a work area where some people are in cubicles but others aren't. Am I being elitist to think that someone should realize that people with private offices are not fair game to interrupt just because the person they came to see doesn't happen to be in their own office?

I don't think it's rude. He was there for a purpose and no one was there to tell him where to go, and the person he needed to meet wasn't there. You are a representative of that company, you should be a team. What would you have expected the person to do? I would have made a call on his behalf and told him to have a seat. It's not that person's fault your company elects not to have a receptionist.
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Old 06-08-2019, 12:35 PM
 
Location: Denver CO
21,205 posts, read 11,826,310 times
Reputation: 32223
Quote:
Originally Posted by Riley. View Post
If you don't want to be available, close your office door. I don't see asking for directions in a poorly marked office space as all that egregious.
You have a problem with signage in your office. Initiate a discussion and fix that problem.
And for maybe the fourth or fifth time, the person DID NOT ask for directions. I get asked that all the time and I always am happy to help someone locate the office of a person in my area - not just in my individual suite, but anywhere on the entire floor if I happen to know.

But that isn't what happened here, they asked where another person physically was because they weren't in their office. And I have zero way of knowing that, and yes, I still find it weird that the person who asked me and apparently people posting on this thread think it's reasonable for co-workers to keep track of the whereabouts of the other workers. Of course, the flip side is that if someone pays too much attention to what their co-workers do (spend time on the phone or at someone else's desk talking to them or whatever) CDers are only too happy to chastise for that too - "Why are you paying so much attention to where your co-worker is and what they are doing? Unless you are their supervisor, it's none of your business!"

In this case, I am not the person's supervisor, and I don't even work in the same department. I just happen to have an office in the same general area where they have an office. So no, I don't know (nor have access to) their schedule. I don't know where they are right now. There is no person to call to answer that question. I don't know where they schedule their meetings if they are somewhere besides their office.

And she would have no idea of those things about me either. I seriously doubt that most of the people posting here criticizing me for that would actually be able to answer those questions about all of their co-workers either.
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Old 06-08-2019, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Denver CO
21,205 posts, read 11,826,310 times
Reputation: 32223
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
This is such a small, insignificant thing. What do you do when real problems arise?
Yes, it's so serious to me I'm going to quit my job over it. It was a simple question and I'm bothered not by the incident itself, but by the inane responses that I am flawed because I can't account for the whereabouts of someone who simply happens to have an office in the same general vicinity as me (although with close to 20 other people actually sitting in between us in various offices and workstations.
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