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Old 06-19-2019, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
4,244 posts, read 2,084,896 times
Reputation: 2655

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
Public sector wages have frozen, and the pension takes a good amount of your pay on top of that.

For example, I get $22/hr, which is a decent salary, but then I lose 12% of my gross to my pension (a required contribution the government won't match until you are 5 or 10 years in), on top of taxes, benefits (which yes are much cheaper and a way better deal than private sector, we still pay here)
You're not losing money to a pension, you're being forced to save money for yourself. AND you're getting matching funds after only 5 years? Sounds great!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
if you count my contributions to my 457b and personal savings, that's half of my income gone. I have a net income of half of my gross.
Your contributions to your 457b and personal savings are optional.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
Now in my government I actually have one of the higher paying jobs that is not supervisory. And it's hard to get a supervisory position in my local government. So imagine paying 12% into a pension, when you make $16/hr.
$16.00/hour minus 12% equals $14.08/hr.

Any job that pays $14.08/hour with a pension and a full complement of benefits is an excellent job for someone with no college degree.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
We all know public sector is lower pay, but the pension benefit is not free to us. And you still have other bills.
?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
Most 401ks I hear about are at 4% which is a bit more reasonable if you are lower income. There are some pensions (401as) upwards of 20% (Louisiana) contribution rates and some as low as 6% (New Mexico) that I've seen. Now the contribution rates and matching is screwy throughout the country, some match percent for percent like mine (12% me 12% government) while some are more generous with a higher employer contribution especially if you are in a public safety (police and fire) pension. I know gas station managers with the same hourly rate that I have, and some even higher.
Pensions and 401Ks! With matching funds!

Like I said, a government job is great for a person with no college degree.

.
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Old 06-19-2019, 09:12 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,635,459 times
Reputation: 3625
Quote:
Originally Posted by AguaDulce View Post
You're not losing money to a pension, you're being forced to save money for yourself. AND you're getting matching funds after only 5 years? Sounds great!




Your contributions to your 457b and personal savings are optional.




$16.00/hour minus 12% equals $14.08/hr.

Any job that pays $14.08/hour with a pension and a full complement of benefits is an excellent job for someone with no college degree.




?




Pensions and 401Ks! With matching funds!

Like I said, a government job is great for a person with no college degree.

.
When you are struggling to pay rent, an extra $400/month being lost is a big factor.

Yes they are, but itís good to have an emergency fund, wouldnít you say that would be the financially responsible thing to do?

$16/hr with a degree, you seemed to miss that part. Not uncommon for hundreds of state jobs. I knew someone who worked for the Game and Fish making $14/hr, before tax and pension, in a job that required a college degree.

Hard to get into a government position without a degree. You keep harping on that. Lots of government jobs require masters degrees, especially any supervisory position. You should try looking at government jobs, instead of chirping what everyone else says. After all wage is public. And the bottom salary is what they hire you at, since the higher wages are for people who have worked there for a certain amount of years. Or did the exact same job somewhere else.
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Old 06-20-2019, 05:40 AM
 
5,113 posts, read 2,597,201 times
Reputation: 6546
Quote:
Originally Posted by USMC1984 View Post
So much for the college degrees... No college here and I'm in the 80-90k range...which is much lower than most of my coworkers due to my not working my max available hours or extra days. Most of my coworkers are in the 100-120+k range.
College degreed here. 5 years into my career and I'm in the 150k+ range.

You can always find someone who makes x amount of money regardless of if they have a college degree or not.

Don't know why nondegreed folks always like to compare their higher end wage spectrum with the lower end of the degreed spectrum.
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Old 06-20-2019, 07:42 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
4,244 posts, read 2,084,896 times
Reputation: 2655
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
Hard to get into a government position without a degree. You keep harping on that. Lots of government jobs require masters degrees, especially any supervisory position. You should try looking at government jobs, instead of chirping what everyone else says. After all wage is public. And the bottom salary is what they hire you at, since the higher wages are for people who have worked there for a certain amount of years. Or did the exact same job somewhere else.
What is your point? Government jobs aint that great and they're hard to get without a degree?

Bottom line is it's all about who you know. That's how I landed my government job without a degree, a job I held for 18 years in Texas before moving to Milwaukee.

The topic of government jobs came up in response to a post about how great the pay is at In-n-Out burger and comparing a fast food job to a government job. I'd rather have great benefits and a pension--and not come home smelling like burgers n fries. And not have someone look down on you when you tell them you work at a burger joint.
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Old 06-20-2019, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,635,459 times
Reputation: 3625
Quote:
Originally Posted by AguaDulce View Post
What is your point? Government jobs aint that great and they're hard to get without a degree?

Bottom line is it's all about who you know. That's how I landed my government job without a degree, a job I held for 18 years in Texas before moving to Milwaukee.

The topic of government jobs came up in response to a post about how great the pay is at In-n-Out burger and comparing a fast food job to a government job. I'd rather have great benefits and a pension--and not come home smelling like burgers n fries. And not have someone look down on you when you tell them you work at a burger joint.
Yes. You getting a job in government without a degree probably 20+ years ago was a sign of better economic opportunities and a more reasonable wage to COL ratio. The game is different for entry level people now, both in the job posting you previously mentioned and in the public sector. Iím saying the grass isnít always greener. If anything wages didnít increase and retirement contribution requirements went up, so itís not as good of a deal anymore. Private sector has an easier time increasing wages, since they donít have the public coming every which way. Even in departments like my own that are 100% permit funded, no taxpayer money.

There are managers at Chick-fil-a who make more than me. Iím just saying the Chick-fil-a manager who makes 75k a year (yes Iíve seen this job posting before in my local area) even with more expensive benefits is probably having an easier time than I am. Only snobs look down on what someone does for a living, what counts is if you can afford your bills and donít hate what you do.
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Old 06-20-2019, 05:04 PM
 
Location: Ohio
19,883 posts, read 14,221,081 times
Reputation: 16075
Quote:
Originally Posted by AguaDulce View Post
The starting salary range is 20-35K, and 20K is about $9.25/hour--

"The ideal candidate will have experience. A bachelor’s degree is REQUIRED."!?
Yeah, so?

The job involves heavy decision-making. You need someone with a Bachelor's for that.

The cost of tuition in Wisconsin is not very high. It's only around $10,000/year at the University of Wisconsin, but a smart person would have gone to a junior or community college for 2 years then transferred in.

I sure hope you don't expect me to feel sorry for some moron who borrowed $100,000 to spend on $30,000 for a 4-year degree.

The Cost-of-Living is not very high in Wisconsin, either.

Just because you can't live on $9.25/hour doesn't mean everyone in the US cannot.


And, since this is a law firm, the benefits are probably awesome and there's probably profit-sharing or bonuses at year's end.
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Old 06-20-2019, 07:22 PM
 
2,404 posts, read 684,967 times
Reputation: 3394
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
Go back and read the first post, especially near the end. One year experience is not no experience.
1 year experience (preferred) means they will accept someone with no experience.

Preferred != required.
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Old 06-20-2019, 07:24 PM
 
2,404 posts, read 684,967 times
Reputation: 3394
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frostnip View Post
That's nuts. Starting pay at at McDonalds in Fairbanks, AK is $11/hour.
The cost of living in Fairbanks, AK is significantly higher than where this ad was posted.
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Old 06-20-2019, 07:27 PM
 
2,404 posts, read 684,967 times
Reputation: 3394
Quote:
Originally Posted by AguaDulce View Post
Internships are a great way to gain extremely valuable experience, engage in networking, and get your foot in the door. It's a perfect system for the recent college graduate.
Post graduate internships disappeared in the early 2000's. Now you have to be a junior or senior to get an internship. Once you graduate, game over, you no longer qualify.

Welcome to 2019. Please make sure your time machine is better calibrated, seems your flux capacitor has the problem.
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Old 06-20-2019, 07:30 PM
 
2,404 posts, read 684,967 times
Reputation: 3394
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jdawg8181 View Post
This job would pay more if it were in NYC or San Francisco.
Yes, and after adjusting for cost of living, the salary would be less.

Never look at the top line (salary), look at the bottom line (salary - cost of living)
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