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Old 06-13-2019, 08:14 PM
 
Location: Southern Most New Jersey
1,099 posts, read 817,928 times
Reputation: 1732

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Pre job jitters. I have always had them. The grass is always greener, yea right..

I would take this job and stay with it for a while. Then look around.

USA/World economies may tank soon. Certainly getting overheated. China making noise. If in private sector possibility of getting laid off if events are extreme.

I had a civil service job for a few years. Enjoyed the laid back attitude. Just had to show up on time and do my assigned tasks. At least in my case no office bs. No free overtime, got paid for all time worked. Great benefits. Sorry entire agency was privatized.
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Old 06-13-2019, 11:52 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,637,492 times
Reputation: 3625
Quote:
Originally Posted by RamenAddict View Post
Yes, and keep in mind that the public sector is small. Even if there is not a central hiring database, the hiring manager at this place might know the manager at another one or he might end up at the hiring committee there in the future.

Once you get into the public sector, it is MUCH easier to move around. Even if you start out in local/municipal government, it makes it much easier to get into state or federal government. I started in state government and am now in federal government. The people hired in at my agency either have directly relevant private sector experience or they came from other federal jobs or had government experience previously.

I know a lot of people who started in the public sector (state) young and they moved up quickly and got a lot of experience. Thatís less likely at a larger private company and probably in federal government. It is a definite benefit if you are looking to gain experience.
When did you get hired by the feds? Iíd like to work for the feds one day. Iím in local government now. It seems impossible to get contacted by the feds for a job posting.
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Old 06-14-2019, 12:09 AM
 
Location: Honolulu
1,068 posts, read 1,468,798 times
Reputation: 2355
I can't say whether you should leave your job or not, as I don't know all the little details about your situation. I will give the best advice I can as someone who has worked in both the private and public sector. As far as rescinding an offer you already accepted, there's no doubt that will leave a bad taste for the person that hired you and they are unlikely to hire you again. I'm not sure what government agency you applied for but I'd assume that the chances of you applying for a job under the same person who extended an offer to you are slim, assuming it's a fairly large agency. Then again, you never know how much influence this person has over others. If I were you I'd call the central HR/Hiring department (Ex. Dept of Human Resources) that deals with hiring for the whole agency. I'm not talking about the HR office for the individual department you got the offer from. Ex. If you were hired by the Dept. of Agriculture don't call the Agriculture HR office. Don't give them your name but just ask if there's any notes they put in their database of people like you if you declined the offer. I know where I worked there was if someone declined a job offer but it's realistic to think not every place would be the same regarding this.

I like the fact that you want to see what's out there before going into civil service. I believe now is the time to figure out what you like rather than later when you may have more responsibilities. In my experience, a large percentage of people who go into civil service stay there until retirement. The pay isn't the best, but the benefits usually far outweigh the private sector and the longer you stay the more your benefits increase (Ex. pension) It seems like many just get so used to it they find it hard to leave. Keep that in mind. Another thing is that if you really want to retire at a civil service job it would be beneficial to not wait too long due to the way pay scales work. If you wait until you're 40 you could very well have to take a pay cut from a private sector job due to public sector jobs basing their pay on both years of service and job title. Look at the pay scales and try to project what would happen if you took a civil service job 5, 10, 15 years from now. Ex. A subordinate could be making more than their boss if they've been in civil service longer. In my experience city, county and state level jobs are much easier to get than federal jobs (W/O veteran's status). I've had multiple job offers from the first 3, while not even an interview from the Feds. However, I can't say how difficult the particular agency you're applying to is to get in to.

I think the most important thing is to contact the HR to see if there are any repercussions for rescinding an acceptance. That'll give you peace of mind too. Good luck in whatever you chose.
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Old 06-14-2019, 04:55 AM
 
12,295 posts, read 15,187,836 times
Reputation: 8108
Everyone seems to think government employment is paradise: job security, pensions, benefits. But it can be horrible. A bad boss is there for the duration. You might get long hours, mandatory overtime. So I don't blame you if you want to leave or turn down the job.
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Old 06-14-2019, 06:57 AM
 
154 posts, read 71,070 times
Reputation: 301
Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
Everyone seems to think government employment is paradise: job security, pensions, benefits. But it can be horrible. A bad boss is there for the duration. You might get long hours, mandatory overtime. So I don't blame you if you want to leave or turn down the job.

And how is that different from a private sector job? You can have the same bad boss, mandatory OT and long hours, but without the good health care insurance, etc. Plus, if you are a good worker with a positive work ethic, once you pass probation , you have little to worry about as far as being laid off from your job.


But a lot is about you and who you are . A sense of humor helps too.
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Old 06-14-2019, 07:01 AM
 
94 posts, read 57,925 times
Reputation: 138
As a civil service employee myself, TAKE THE JOB. It's a pain to navigate the hiring process (waiting, waiting, and more waiting) and you've already survived that part. I struggled through my first several years out of college, and it took me going back to get a graduate degree to open up my opportunity. I haven't regretted it one bit. There are too many new college graduates that are miserable so if you have a good opportunity, grab it now while it's there.



Once you get in and get some experience, you'll have so many opportunities available to you. Is it easy all the time? Nope. But I have way more good days than bad days.


Good luck!
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Old 06-14-2019, 07:27 AM
 
3,964 posts, read 1,693,299 times
Reputation: 8077
Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
Everyone seems to think government employment is paradise: job security, pensions, benefits. But it can be horrible. A bad boss is there for the duration. You might get long hours, mandatory overtime. So I don't blame you if you want to leave or turn down the job.
The OP hasnít started the job... and you can always move within the system once you get in. A lot have pretty good perks. When I worked for the state, you could get a tuition waiver for many undergraduate and graduate degrees at state universities. I knew a lot of people who stayed just long enough to take advantage of that benefit. Many jobs were flexible and would work around part-time classes.
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Old 06-14-2019, 11:28 AM
 
10,058 posts, read 4,654,843 times
Reputation: 15285
Quote:
Originally Posted by RamenAddict View Post
The OP hasn’t started the job... and you can always move within the system once you get in. A lot have pretty good perks. When I worked for the state, you could get a tuition waiver for many undergraduate and graduate degrees at state universities. I knew a lot of people who stayed just long enough to take advantage of that benefit. Many jobs were flexible and would work around part-time classes.
You can move without being in the system... Public service is a small portion of jobs.

You can jump in and out of public/private sector too. No reason to lock himself in the public sector solely because it is "public". Go if it has something to offer that you want, if not no big deal. Go in when you see something you want from it.

One of the biggest thing for me is no matter how much I dislike the management, I'm not there for them at the end of the day but the mission of the agency. That goal makes going in each day more manageable than knowing a paycheck is there because you can get a paycheck anywhere. Means you treat the job more than that paycheck every 2 weeks.

But he has to like that goal or a different one to like public job, or it is a longer drag that is the same.
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Old 06-14-2019, 06:35 PM
 
33 posts, read 9,594 times
Reputation: 92
From the sound of your post, it seems like youíre only beginning youíre career and are unsure of which direction to head career-wise. Since youíre not Ďlovingí your current position, Iíd recommend moving forward with this new offer. This wonít be your last job by any means - but life is a process of elimination. Youíll be able to learn what you donít like, which can help lead you to what you do like.

I started in the public sector - moved to private - and now giving the public sector a second go. Good luck in your decision!
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Old 06-15-2019, 09:17 PM
 
2,059 posts, read 595,941 times
Reputation: 2905
Quote:
Originally Posted by insulator_king View Post
And how is that different from a private sector job? You can have the same bad boss, mandatory OT and long hours, but without the good health care insurance, etc. Plus, if you are a good worker with a positive work ethic, once you pass probation , you have little to worry about as far as being laid off from your job.


But a lot is about you and who you are . A sense of humor helps too.
Yeah having a sense of humor totally negates a horrible work environment.....

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