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Old 06-16-2019, 03:10 PM
 
11,123 posts, read 8,531,120 times
Reputation: 28094

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1. Take your home address off of your resume. Just list your name, phone #, and email.
2. Apply to places within a reasonable driving distance so you can drive to any potential interviews.
3. Cover letters really aren't needed unless specifically requested. No need to explain anything that hasn't been requested.

If you have a strong resume, you will get calls. Anything that needs to be explained, can be explained later after the interview or offer.

Of course, I am assuming you are going to cover your own relocation costs.
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Old 06-16-2019, 04:11 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,637,492 times
Reputation: 3625
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobsell View Post
Telling the truth is not "debbie downer"

Employers have ridiculous standards.



If you don't want to deal with the real world, you're welcome not to. You have to get around the geographic discrimination.



If both of you bothered to read my entire post, you'll see it wasn't intended as advice, but rather as a slam at unrealistic and unreasonable requirements of entitled employers.

Both of your sarcasm detectors are broken and need retuning.
Iím asking for advice against geographic discrimination that is actually realistic. Iím 24 and single and donít have 10 years of savings to where I can do this. If you arenít going to provide that, please leave. I already know itís a uphill battle, thatís not what Iím asking for. Iím asking for tips on the actual application, not committing financial suicide.

Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
1. Take your home address off of your resume. Just list your name, phone #, and email.
2. Apply to places within a reasonable driving distance so you can drive to any potential interviews.
3. Cover letters really aren't needed unless specifically requested. No need to explain anything that hasn't been requested.

If you have a strong resume, you will get calls. Anything that needs to be explained, can be explained later after the interview or offer.

Of course, I am assuming you are going to cover your own relocation costs.
What about in applications that make you enter your address in a text field?
I already stated there were no jobs in a reasonable driving distance. Iím trying to move far away anyway. The nearest job is a contract position in Flagstaff 2 hours away.

Yes I can fund my own relo. What I canít do is move somewhere with no support system without a job lined up, like some people are insisting is the only way this is done.
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Old 06-16-2019, 06:37 PM
 
Location: Seattle
1,757 posts, read 1,014,807 times
Reputation: 3013
Provide the address, leaving it off will almost certainly put you in the no-hire pile.

As I mentioned, address relocation in the cover letter.
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Old 06-17-2019, 02:20 AM
 
Location: U.S.A., Earth
4,490 posts, read 2,877,828 times
Reputation: 4006
If you're applying to government positions, shouldn't you be applying through USAjobs.gov? In that case, the process there is different. Off the top of my head, you need a resume that's suited for government jobs. Typically, resumes are 1 to 2 pages, but resumes tend to be 4 to 5 pages, with some around 10 pages for more experienced folk. However, don't recall if this is only for federal jobs, or all sorts of government positions


.


"You're damned if you do and you're damned if you don't" on the address part. I would just leave it on. If it's SUCH A BIG DEAL that you need to be local for a new position, they'll take steps to eliminate you from the get-go even if you leave it off. I don't doubt that some folks here on C-D have made the "move to an area without a job lined up first. THEN look for work" method work. However, that is NOT me. First off, when I was job hunting, I wasn't dead set on any one particular city. New York, Boston, the south, midwest, west coast... it was all good so long as they paid me enough to make it work. When I got an offer of employment, signed, and returned via certified mail, I'd use the time from then to my start day to hunt for apartments. If out of town, stay a day or 2 at a hotel. Prior to getting my first real/career job, I was living with my parents. Both me and them agreed there's no point in throwing away rent money when they had a place for me to live in the meantime.


For the resume (assuming you apply to it normally, as opposed to government avenue), try to tailor it for the position, mention the skills in your resume that they're looking for from their job listing. If you're emailing someone, attach your resume in Word or PDF format.


.


COVER LETTER... include this in the body of the email.
Sample template below....



I am writing to apply for the ____ position in __city and state__ listed for that job.


I have reviewed the job listing andbelieve I am a very good fit for the role following reasons:

list 2 to 4 bullet points that'll apply to the job (like advanced Microsoft Office skills for tech writing, whatever). Brief details under each

I look forward to speaking with youabout how my skills and experiences can add more value to __company__. In the meantime, please see my resume thatwas included as part of this application, and do not hesitate to contact me forany further information you may need.



Best Regards,
your name
your phone number



.

More cases than not, HM are busy, so when in doubt, make it brief.
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Old 06-17-2019, 08:59 AM
 
639 posts, read 1,375,681 times
Reputation: 562
I've been on both sides of this issue. I successfully found employement in another state prior to my move, and I've hired people from out-of-state.

I would leave your address on your resume/application--omitting them raises suspicion. Early in your cover letter, address the reason why you are interested in moving to where the job is located (not why you want to leave currently reside) and let them know that you have visits during which you'd be available to interview. Employers don't want to foot a travel bill for a first-time interview--so letting them know they are off the hook for that removes the obstacle. No need to put actual dates in the letter--you'd likely have a phone screening/interview first and they'd ask when you'd be avaialable. Book the trip whenever the interview is scheduled. Obviously this puts the costs of the travel on you, but it's worth it for a position that will afford you the move you desire.
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Old 06-17-2019, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,637,492 times
Reputation: 3625
Quote:
Originally Posted by ackmondual View Post
If you're applying to government positions, shouldn't you be applying through USAjobs.gov? In that case, the process there is different. Off the top of my head, you need a resume that's suited for government jobs. Typically, resumes are 1 to 2 pages, but resumes tend to be 4 to 5 pages, with some around 10 pages for more experienced folk. However, don't recall if this is only for federal jobs, or all sorts of government positions


.


"You're damned if you do and you're damned if you don't" on the address part. I would just leave it on. If it's SUCH A BIG DEAL that you need to be local for a new position, they'll take steps to eliminate you from the get-go even if you leave it off. I don't doubt that some folks here on C-D have made the "move to an area without a job lined up first. THEN look for work" method work. However, that is NOT me. First off, when I was job hunting, I wasn't dead set on any one particular city. New York, Boston, the south, midwest, west coast... it was all good so long as they paid me enough to make it work. When I got an offer of employment, signed, and returned via certified mail, I'd use the time from then to my start day to hunt for apartments. If out of town, stay a day or 2 at a hotel. Prior to getting my first real/career job, I was living with my parents. Both me and them agreed there's no point in throwing away rent money when they had a place for me to live in the meantime.


For the resume (assuming you apply to it normally, as opposed to government avenue), try to tailor it for the position, mention the skills in your resume that they're looking for from their job listing. If you're emailing someone, attach your resume in Word or PDF format.


.


COVER LETTER... include this in the body of the email.
Sample template below....



I am writing to apply for the ____ position in __city and state__ listed for that job.


I have reviewed the job listing andbelieve I am a very good fit for the role following reasons:

list 2 to 4 bullet points that'll apply to the job (like advanced Microsoft Office skills for tech writing, whatever). Brief details under each

I look forward to speaking with youabout how my skills and experiences can add more value to __company__. In the meantime, please see my resume thatwas included as part of this application, and do not hesitate to contact me forany further information you may need.



Best Regards,
your name
your phone number



.

More cases than not, HM are busy, so when in doubt, make it brief.
There are more governments than just the feds, so no I wouldn't be using USAJobs. Local government varies a lot more on that front, but it doesn't hurt to have a similar style as the federal application. A lot of local governments these days use a website called governmentjobs.com which is actually similar to say indeed as in you can load your resume and everything already and it makes applying for mass jobs on the website significantly easier. The federal government jobs, while I would like to work there eventually, are much more senior and I don't qualify for them at this time.

Thank you for the template! It helps a lot. I've never needed a cover letter before, and I feel like I need one now, so it's extremely useful. Since this is my first time...

Quote:
Originally Posted by MnMomma View Post
I've been on both sides of this issue. I successfully found employement in another state prior to my move, and I've hired people from out-of-state.

I would leave your address on your resume/application--omitting them raises suspicion. Early in your cover letter, address the reason why you are interested in moving to where the job is located (not why you want to leave currently reside) and let them know that you have visits during which you'd be available to interview. Employers don't want to foot a travel bill for a first-time interview--so letting them know they are off the hook for that removes the obstacle. No need to put actual dates in the letter--you'd likely have a phone screening/interview first and they'd ask when you'd be avaialable. Book the trip whenever the interview is scheduled. Obviously this puts the costs of the travel on you, but it's worth it for a position that will afford you the move you desire.
Yeah I don't mind funding the plane tickets and such, it's about landing those interviews. Even if I wanted to omit my address, my current employer directly states where I live in it's title (since I work for a local government) so it's a wash anyway. Maybe in the private sector that works better but, I don't think that's applicable here.

Even though I don't have any planned visits to these cities, I should still say I will be visiting anyway?
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Old 06-17-2019, 01:43 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,490 posts, read 62,120,010 times
Reputation: 32158
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
Yeah I don't mind funding the plane tickets and such, it's about landing those interviews.
You blew right past the point about being close enough to drive there and on short notice.
If you really intend to seek long distance jobs that require airfare... all bets are off.

What city do you really want to be in/near? Pick ONE and make that decision first.
Look for just about anything that you can get hired into there - to justify the move more easily.

If you're lucky (and skilled of course) you might get a good.
More likely though is having to move there without a job.
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Old 06-17-2019, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,637,492 times
Reputation: 3625
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
You blew right past the point about being close enough to drive there and on short notice.
If you really intend to seek long distance jobs that require airfare... all bets are off.

What city do you really want to be in/near? Pick ONE and make that decision first.
Look for just about anything that you can get hired into there - to justify the move more easily.

If you're lucky (and skilled of course) you might get a good.
More likely though is having to move there without a job.
In case you are wondering why this won't work, it's already been addressed on the first page. Please re-read that. Again it's not an option and I'm not going to consider that. It's a small niche field with almost 2 jobs max in any given city, most one position in any metro and I don't really have a preference for a city at this point. I just want to work in this field. So yeah to move to a whole new city to risk everything I have done so far for ONE position is asinine.

My goal is to work in this field. Not to be in a certain city, so you have this backwards. I'm not just going to take some contract or whatever job I can get my hands on so I can live in Seattle no I'm going to pick even a podunk town in rural Kentucky if it means working in this field. Right now it is job over city, not city over job. So what you are suggesting is for a targeted relocation for a certain city, this is more like a targeted relocation for a job opportunity. Again what you are suggesting is backwards. I have goals and being in my current job is not going to get me there. And being in X city isn't going to get me there either, unless the job happens to be in this field.
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Old 06-17-2019, 02:33 PM
 
356 posts, read 236,406 times
Reputation: 685
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
I'm in the process of job hunting for jobs out of my area. The main reason being is A) I will hate myself if I never try living outside of Arizona and B) There are no job opportunities in my dream field here. I'm currently in an "adjacent" field (meaning my current job applies somewhat), and I have older work experience and volunteer work in my dream field, but despite all of this I am still petrified of editing my resume and writing a cover letter (which I have not had to do before). I obsess over these two things, to the point of hours gone, trying to pick the nitty gritty and see things from a hiring manager's perspective, despite this much effort it doesn't cure the application jitters or to the point I'm so nervous about wasted time I don't even apply at all.

Many career advice websites mention cover letters targeting key cities for a relocation for say a family reason or a partner acquiring a job, but really I am open to living anywhere even Timbuktu (not scared of an international job, in fact I'd welcome such an experience). I don't want to lie on my cover letter and say it's because of my partner (don't have one) or family (my close family all relocated to Florida in the past couple of years, and I'm not trying to move there, though if the opportunity arose I'd take it). While I can identify a certain few cities I think I'd really enjoy living in, I have never traveled to them, and I don't want to say I have always wanted to live in X City either. I can fund my own relocation, but I just need that written job offer before I do it.

I am finding many jobs all across the US almost all of which I would love to have and I am qualified for. I just don't know how to sell myself as good candidate worth interviewing when I am hundreds and hundreds of miles away.

For those of you who have had experience in this realm, either in hiring an out of state applicant or been one yourself, what tips do you recommend in regards to the resume and cover letter?
I didn't read all the messages so I apologize if this is redundant.

1) don't say anything on your cover letter and delete your address, include only your phone number and email address.

2) explain in your cover letter that you are already planning on moving to X city and would like secure employment before arriving (it's not a lie because you do plan to move there if you get a job). Also include that you can make yourself available for an in person interview (and be prepared to pay for the trip yourself).

3) you don't need to give an explanation for why you're relocating. If someone asks just say I find the weather in AZ too overwhelming.

4) If you are looking at jobs where you need a community connection already, that would be a hard sell since you are unfamiliar with the area. If that is the case, you would need to save up and move there first, take any job to pay the bills and then go out and apply for your ideal job.

5) recruiters don't care where you live but the hiring managers usually do. If you have an impressive resume, that usually gets you in the door for at least an interview, just stay away from the personal information and focus on what your qualifications mean to the job. And PLEASE do not say you want to "learn" the industry or you want the "experience to develop". Hiring managers want people to come in ready to perform.
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Old 06-17-2019, 05:53 PM
 
Location: Eugene, Oregon
9,135 posts, read 2,998,035 times
Reputation: 13779
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobsell View Post
Employers discriminate against those who are out of their commuting area. They don't want to pay relocation costs, even if they advertise it.

You have to move first to the area where your dream job exists, update your resume with the new address, and then apply.

Yes, this is a huge financial risk.
Yes, landlords demand you pay 6 months rent in advance since you don't have a job.
Yes, you can't keep your job in AZ to make this happen.

But that's how to get around the geographic discrimination.

Does this sound like totally unreasonable? I agree. Too many employers are just entitled.

One way to get yourself out of your home area, is to take a long-term approach to it. Find a job with a large company that has branches all over the country. Establish yourself with a few years of good work and then apply for a transfer to the location you want. If the management of the new location wants you as an employee, your moving expenses may be paid.
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