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Old 06-17-2019, 10:47 AM
 
Location: Texas
158 posts, read 40,470 times
Reputation: 307

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You need to have a discussion with the other manager and the business owner and all get on the same page.

What are the company expectations for employees?
What is the company expectation of the conduct of an animal on the property?
Once you get the management team on the same page and agreement that they will support you then you go to your employee with written expectations:
Hours of work ... and company expectations for any variations.
Expectation for conduct of animals.
Consequences of failure to follow expectations.
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Old 06-17-2019, 11:13 AM
 
7,369 posts, read 4,221,154 times
Reputation: 5055
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcsangel2 View Post
This is actually not meant to sound snarky, but, if you're looking for a suggestion that will magically turn her into a great employee, that isn't going to happen.

You've got more power to change this situation than most of us who have coworkers like this...you can be direct with her about your expectations, or you can let her go. You just need to decide which choice is preferable, and live with it.
I guess that is the problem. I want her to be a great employee that just comes to work when she is supposed to, without any fanfare. But thatís on her... not me
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Old 06-17-2019, 11:16 AM
 
7,369 posts, read 4,221,154 times
Reputation: 5055
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bevv View Post
You need to have a discussion with the other manager and the business owner and all get on the same page.

What are the company expectations for employees?
What is the company expectation of the conduct of an animal on the property?
Once you get the management team on the same page and agreement that they will support you then you go to your employee with written expectations:
Hours of work ... and company expectations for any variations.
Expectation for conduct of animals.
Consequences of failure to follow expectations.
In regards to animals, only mine is allowed. Up until now, no one has ever challenged it. One dog is plenty in an office and warehouse.
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Old 06-17-2019, 11:53 AM
 
Location: Texas
158 posts, read 40,470 times
Reputation: 307
Quote:
Originally Posted by LowonLuck View Post
In regards to animals, only mine is allowed. Up until now, no one has ever challenged it. One dog is plenty in an office and warehouse.
Only yours WAS allowed till your management chain allowed the second dog. Since the second dog was allowed to be there by someone the dog's presence is now an issue. Someone in your management chain needs to deal with the issue. The easiest way would be to make a set of guidelines that the second dog will not be able to adhere to. By doing that you get rid of that problem... the dog... and can focus on the employee adhering to expected tour of duty.
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Old 06-17-2019, 01:38 PM
 
121 posts, read 20,531 times
Reputation: 140
This is one of the problems with being in "full employment". It's bad enough finding people during good times, but now its almost impossible to find anyone with reasonable intelligence.
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Old 06-17-2019, 01:50 PM
 
7,369 posts, read 4,221,154 times
Reputation: 5055
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oh Oh It's Magic View Post
This is one of the problems with being in "full employment". It's bad enough finding people during good times, but now its almost impossible to find anyone with reasonable intelligence.
Agreed. I am ready to say give me a raise and I will work until till 5 every day. 10 hour days are not terrible.
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Old 06-17-2019, 02:53 PM
 
Location: S.W. Florida
2,206 posts, read 929,655 times
Reputation: 6228
Quote:
Originally Posted by LowonLuck View Post
I know I am a little grouchy over this new diet, but our newest employee is driving me nuts.

She was hired for 9-5. Thatís it. It is the highest call volume time and when she is needed. Which she agreed to when hired. The first two weeks because of training, she worked 7 am-3 PM, so I could train her. Since then every day she either asks to work 7-3 or tells me how much better she likes it and how she hates 9-5.

I am tired of saying that she canít begin making calls until 9 am, so there is not need for her from 7-9. Still every day she asks...Today she started texting me at 3:30 am asking if she could work the early shift.

Second, I bring my dog every day. He is a very calm old man that sleeps all day in my office. He only greets someone when they call him. Goes outside maybe once or twice a day. Is fine if a customer walks in and leaves the door open. Never barks.

On a Saturday, when only two of us were working, I allowed her to bring her dog as a trial. He was jack russell crazy needy all day. He pees on things, had to be watched constantly, needs to be walked many times throughout the day. He needs to be held and ends up on every employees lap through out the day. He barks when a customer walks in and she is in constant fear he will run out the door. We work on a very busy main road, so yes he is not safe here. I told her he was to big of a distraction and needy to be here on regular work days. So she asks another boss and owner of he could come. Neither knew how needy the dog was... now she brings the unruly dog and her production is decreased significantly.

Again I have explained this several times and she just does what she wants... ugh.
This is easy. She needs a new boss, one that will not permit her to work the hours she wants vs. what the company needs. Her current boss is too lazy and unmotivated to hold her feet to the fire. Maybe he is coasting towards retirement?
Youíre welcome.
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Old 06-17-2019, 04:24 PM
 
6,538 posts, read 1,339,947 times
Reputation: 16563
I agree with what almost everyone else said, in so many words: that you should emphasize that you are the boss and you make the rules, not her. I also understand that you don't want to train someone new, so I am just asking --

Can you give her a choice of working 9 to 3? It will be less hours and not full-time, but if it is either that or working 9 to 5, maybe she will reconsider how much she needs and wants the job. Btw, depending on what, if any, benefits you offer, you might be better off, too, with such a schedule as most part-timers do not get much, if anything, in the way of benefits.

(Personally, I would rather NOT have someone working for me who was not happy. I think it might be better for both you and her if you let her go.)
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Old 06-17-2019, 05:50 PM
 
332 posts, read 142,111 times
Reputation: 370
You need to shake your balls and be a man!
Remind her that you hired her because of what you were looking for and she is not meeting your expectations. Give her 1st warning letter and remind her that she is still on probation and that is a cause for dismissal.
Tell your to show up for her scheduled hours and no more of her dog as it doesn't fit in with the work culture.

I agree with another comment that you must communicate with other management and what you will do to fix the problem with her, otherwise, she is out. Tell them you expect their support so that you can direct her to what this company is expecting from it's employees.

By the way, your title say "employee frustrations..." but as I read along, you say that you are her manager. She is not your coworker.

Also, whatever you say, make sure it is in writing as part of her warning. After you talk to her, you document what you said, how it went and forward to HR.
Then email her that you want follow-up meeting with her next week or whatever you see fit.

I hope you update us on the results.
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Old 06-17-2019, 06:21 PM
 
2,111 posts, read 2,087,563 times
Reputation: 3563
Get your boss's agreement that you are going to tell her only once that she has to come in from 9-5 and not bring the dog. If she continues to ask or does what she wants fire her. This is one of the hard lessons I learned from running my own company. I tried to "fix" things and be nice. It never worked out and I regretted not pulling the band aid off sooner even if I had to go back to square one and find someone else.

Of course if you have an HR department tell them your problem and proposed solution and let them handle the details.
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