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Old 07-03-2019, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
12,472 posts, read 4,216,580 times
Reputation: 9779

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lekrii View Post
There are a lot of jobs open, and a lot of positions in need (it's pretty much impossible to argue with the fact that the job market is better today than it has been in decades). The base requirements are higher today, though. The days of comfortably staying at the same job for 30 years are over. Anyone who puts time in, puts in a little extra effort to continually learn new things and keep up with changing technology, etc. won't have trouble finding a job.
As always I prefer to do it differently. I've been at my job for a long time. Not 30 years, but more than 20. I'm not learning new skills in my off time. I'm enjoying my off time instead, and doing as many fun things as I am able. I'm concentrating my efforts into cutting costs and building a nest egg instead, so that if and when the time comes that my job is no longer there -- I would say it's 50%/50% in next 5 to 7 years -- I don't have to scramble. No mortgage, no car payment, I've got only $400 on my credit card currently. I'll get a job doing something, but I'm not going to have to worry about impressing some millennial in a human resources position in order to get hired for half of what I currently make.
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Old 07-03-2019, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn,NY
10,612 posts, read 13,141,260 times
Reputation: 16173
Quote:
Originally Posted by BusinessManIT View Post
All industries are spurring new hiring. The job market is ablaze with countless opportunities for good and mediocre workers all over the place. Everyone who wants a job at any level can have one. Unemployment is at historic lows. Anyone who believes otherwise is just a nutty conspiracy theorist. Why? Because I said so.
Many jobs are available I agree. My company cannot keep workers from management to lower level from jumping ship. We have people smiling and walking off the job saying they quit. Ive held two jobs over the last year, and had to stop the part time one. Too MANY hours. Used to be the opposite for me.
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Old 07-03-2019, 04:48 PM
 
1,859 posts, read 714,806 times
Reputation: 3975
Quote:
Originally Posted by D. Scott View Post
Many jobs are available I agree. My company cannot keep workers from management to lower level from jumping ship. We have people smiling and walking off the job saying they quit. Ive held two jobs over the last year, and had to stop the part time one. Too MANY hours. Used to be the opposite for me.
I was being facetious in my post. I am seeing quite the opposite. Sorry, but I hoped that my unscientific "because I said so" quote would tip people off that this was a joke post. I should have been more clear.

It is good that you are experiencing a situation where the worker is in the driver's seat, can smugly push their managers around and that management has to kowtow to them. It should be like that everywhere, but sadly it isn't.
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Old 07-04-2019, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn,NY
10,612 posts, read 13,141,260 times
Reputation: 16173
Quote:
Originally Posted by BusinessManIT View Post
I was being facetious in my post. I am seeing quite the opposite. Sorry, but I hoped that my unscientific "because I said so" quote would tip people off that this was a joke post. I should have been more clear.

It is good that you are experiencing a situation where the worker is in the driver's seat, can smugly push their managers around and that management has to kowtow to them. It should be like that everywhere, but sadly it isn't.
Im hearing opposite experiences from some too. Maybe its more specific to some industries? Im in hotels in a large city so jobs are more plentiful with this. We actually all got raises. HR said they want to "stay competitive".

Cant forget the one guy when I was at work a few months in. He fist bumped me, said he quit and was going to get a beer. Not professional but it certainly stands out in my memory.
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Old 07-07-2019, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Washington state
5,436 posts, read 2,759,563 times
Reputation: 16335
Quote:
Originally Posted by roodd279 View Post
That's kind of the point, isn't it? Expectations are unreasonable.

For the last fifty years or so, anyway - no one expected high school graduates to receive their diploma and the next day score a job
that paid the same as their dad's job, where he worked his way up either through experience or education.
There have always been low wage jobs for high school graduates and kids working their way through college. There were always manufacturing jobs and blue collar jobs a high school graduate (or even a drop out) could get that would allow him to at least pay for housing and food and support a family if he didn't want to go on to college. And there have always been jobs for those who finished college and wanted to advance in the workplace. That was then, this is now.

Now we have low wage jobs. And we have jobs that are specifically geared to a specific degree that has cost someone upwards of $20,000 or more (usually more) to get. The cost of housing has made it impossible to live on a minimum wage job and the cost of education has made it difficult for anyone to get a job requiring a degree. Where does that leave people?

My mom was born in 1930. She asked me one day why it was so hard to find a good paying job. I opened up the paper. The jobs I saw listed cashier, teller, hotel clerk, sales person. They were all low paying jobs. I asked her if she knew what those jobs were. Of course she did. Could she describe what those people did? Of course she could.

Then I went to the technical listings. The jobs listed there were software development engineer, network manager, iOS software developer, Java developer, SDET, senior game programmer.

I asked if she had ever heard of those jobs. If she knew what they were and how they were done. Crickets.

She wanted to know why I couldn't be an entry level business analyst. After all, it said entry level. I had to look this up again, but here were some of the things that you were required to know before applying:

  • Experience with UAT and Black-box testing
  • Experience in generating testing plans, testing scripts, and issue tracking.
  • Experience and willingness to execute lengthy manual regression testing scripts.
So, Mom, do you know what those things are? Well, I don't either. I didn't magically learn them by osmosis just because I taught myself to use a computer or just because I'm younger than you. So what part of you go to college to learn these things do you not understand?

What my mom and what so many other people don't understand, is that the jobs that pay a decent wage these days require detailed knowledge of what it is you are going to do and a degree to show you have the requirements to do it. Anyone that looks at help wanted ads today can be assured of two things: 1) if you know what the job is, it's probably a low wage or minimum wage job. And 2) if the job is something you can't fathom or understand the requirements for, you're looking at a job that is going to cost you beaucoup bucks to get the skills for.

And those are pretty much the only two kinds of jobs left in this country. That's not unreasonable expectations. That's our country shooting itself in the head.

Last edited by rodentraiser; 07-07-2019 at 05:22 PM..
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Old 07-07-2019, 05:19 PM
 
Location: 130 Miles E of Sacramento
5,453 posts, read 3,294,151 times
Reputation: 3626
In my area, it seems that tech and warehouse are the industries that does most of the hiring
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Old 07-07-2019, 05:31 PM
 
291 posts, read 42,585 times
Reputation: 640
I don't think it's EVER been this good. In fact, the planets are aligned: Low unemployment, record stock market, low interest rates, relatively low global conflict, cars more reliable than ever, super technology (e.g. 4G) in the pockets of ditch diggers, and our homes at record highs. These are the "good old days".
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Old 07-08-2019, 08:51 AM
 
82 posts, read 14,668 times
Reputation: 81
Like airline pilot, underwater welder, and cruise ship captain - some jobs just plain require experience. That has never - ever - changed.

Plenty of places local to me are hiring (m o nster.com, it took me almost 30 seconds to find five) entry level, no experience, high school grad, willing to work - warehouse, maintenance, assembly, and "factory" - which could mean steel mill, or lumberyard - are advertising at at least $15/hr, and I live in one of the lowest paying places in the country.

Google UAW starting wages. New workers. The average is $12 - $19 hour, depending on several factors, so let's just call it $15.50. There is - on paper, anyway - very little difference between the opportunities available to high school grads now and "back then." (Before you say it paid much more "back then" inflationary-wise - go read about it. It did not. If anything, it pays more now.)

But the things you want to buy - expectations - have changed. I can't afford to buy the 49ers. But I don't believe it's because I can't get a job at Ford.

Your (great?) grandparents could probably afford a house that was 3x their annual income with money leftover for taxes and food.

So can you. 3x $40K = $120K. What were you hoping for?
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Old 07-08-2019, 12:12 PM
 
Location: Washington state
5,436 posts, read 2,759,563 times
Reputation: 16335
Quote:
Originally Posted by roodd279 View Post
Like airline pilot, underwater welder, and cruise ship captain - some jobs just plain require experience. That has never - ever - changed.

Plenty of places local to me are hiring (m o nster.com, it took me almost 30 seconds to find five) entry level, no experience, high school grad, willing to work - warehouse, maintenance, assembly, and "factory" - which could mean steel mill, or lumberyard - are advertising at at least $15/hr, and I live in one of the lowest paying places in the country.

Google UAW starting wages. New workers. The average is $12 - $19 hour, depending on several factors, so let's just call it $15.50. There is - on paper, anyway - very little difference between the opportunities available to high school grads now and "back then." (Before you say it paid much more "back then" inflationary-wise - go read about it. It did not. If anything, it pays more now.)

But the things you want to buy - expectations - have changed. I can't afford to buy the 49ers. But I don't believe it's because I can't get a job at Ford.

Your (great?) grandparents could probably afford a house that was 3x their annual income with money leftover for taxes and food.

So can you. 3x $40K = $120K. What were you hoping for?
Let me tell you something. When I made $10 an hour and paid $545 a month for rent, I had no problem affording anything. I even had a car payment at the time and cable.

Today, $10 an hour isn't going to pay for any apartment in this city (and this isn't exactly an expensive city). The same apartment I lived in then now goes for about $1200+. Then I paid $3 to ride the ferry. Today the cost is over $8 and going up again. Gas is higher, groceries are higher, utilities are higher, house prices have doubled and tripled. Not only that, now you have to have a minimum income requirement to rent there, and you have to have a high credit score. I've seen other places that I would have no problem affording, but they want your income to be three times your rent. So if you're going to pay $1200 a month, you'd need to be bringing in $3600 and that's about $22.50 an hour.

There can be a bazillion jobs listed today, but if they don't pay a living wage, what use are they?
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Old 07-08-2019, 01:29 PM
 
731 posts, read 531,797 times
Reputation: 836
I live in a high COL metro area. Easy to get, relatively high paying jobs include babysitting (20+/hr), Tutoring or lessons in music or a sport, most anything “marketing” including event planning, experiential marketing, data analytics, social media. Low training hospital jobs like patient intake, reception, financial office, department admin. Some commission based retail store jobs (shoes, fine jewelry) in places like Bloomingdales or saks. House cleaners charge $100 for 3.5 hours.
People who can sew, upholster, light carpentry and handyman, lay tile, clean gutters, maintain and plant flower gardens, set up home electronics, clean up hard drives, even dog walk are all making well over $25 an hour.
Some even cash off the books. I am surprised by the demand.
Are you seeing that?
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