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Old 07-10-2019, 03:22 AM
 
Location: U.S.A., Earth
4,518 posts, read 2,893,607 times
Reputation: 4048

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Quote:
Originally Posted by 3littlebirdies View Post
How is quitting going to make your job search easier?
More time to do job searches. As someone else mentioned, it's easier to schedule in interviews.
.
I've known people who have used company resources, on company time, to job hunt, so that "helps". Of course, in this case, you may going against company policy. However, they're dead set at leaving, so they don't really care at that point. Especially if they're still getting some "minimal" work done.
.
For the latter, I've known folks who conduct interview during lunch hours, or simply leave the building for a quieter place while conducting the interview over their cell phone.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevroqs View Post
I would be more dissatisfied taking a job out of desperation and stuck in a worse environment than the previous one.
You can always quit THAT. However, you can't put it down on your resume, so it's like nothing changed
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobsell View Post
This advice assumes that the job market is actually functional. The US job market is dysfunctional. Employers discriminate against people who are out of work .
People are still getting hired for jobs they shouldn't be getting. Besides internships are asking for experience these days, but you need a job for the experience You'd think such a person would NEVER get employed, but through sheer will, you do break the cycle.


If nothing else, if you're good at what you do, they won't care if you've been out of work. If you're an expert at something, being out of the job market doesn't mean you'll forget how to apply yourself. You could even take a lower salary. However, this would be bad for the employer, as you're now employed, and could use that as a springboard to jump ship for a job that DOES pay better
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Old 07-10-2019, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Richmond, Virginia
179 posts, read 78,455 times
Reputation: 348
Everyone focuses on the downsides of leaving a crappy job and none of the upside. At some point you have to take risks with your life to get to a place you want to be. Jobs hold many people back as does the perception that you must be continuously employed throughout life. Do you think the early frontiersman cared much for job security? Or the men who sailed the seas to make it here?

No one remembers the guy just doing his job for the sake of his own security. Be bold and do what you need to do. You may suffer as a result but hopefully you will learn from it. It is also possible you will succeed and look back fondly on your risk-taking.

Corporate stooges and phonies do not take risks. Contrary to what everyone else is saying, employers -- particularly hiring managers (not HR ladies) -- do not automatically view the unemployed less favorably for a job. In fact, taking risks, like quitting a job without another, can just as easily be seen as a good thing. If such a person left because the job was a poor fit for them, it is indicative of the temperament to succeed quickly and take on additional responsibility. Just make sure you are comfortable with the level of risk we're talking here and add to your financial cushion to make it through.

Good luck! I always encourage people to follow their gut, even if it takes a while before action.

Best yet, start a business. Perform a service and immediately start charging for it. Don't waste time building something up, start charging.

Last edited by adriftinthebay; 07-10-2019 at 09:59 AM..
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Old 07-10-2019, 07:50 PM
 
2,487 posts, read 709,914 times
Reputation: 3477
Quote:
Originally Posted by ackmondual View Post
More time to do job searches. As someone else mentioned, it's easier to schedule in interviews.
But you won't get as many as you're out of work and employers discriminate against those who are out of work.
.

Quote:
People are still getting hired for jobs they shouldn't be getting. Besides internships are asking for experience these days, but you need a job for the experience You'd think such a person would NEVER get employed, but through sheer will, you do break the cycle.
Cronies are the exception to the catch-22. But 99% of the people are not cronies.

Quote:
If nothing else, if you're good at what you do, they won't care if you've been out of work. If you're an expert at something, being out of the job market doesn't mean you'll forget how to apply yourself. You could even take a lower salary. However, this would be bad for the employer, as you're now employed, and could use that as a springboard to jump ship for a job that DOES pay better
If one is out of work, employers will stereotype them as worthless, so it doesn't matter if they're good at what they do.
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Old 07-10-2019, 07:56 PM
 
2,487 posts, read 709,914 times
Reputation: 3477
Quote:
Originally Posted by adriftinthebay View Post
Everyone focuses on the downsides of leaving a crappy job and none of the upside.
It is OK to leave a crappy job. Just don't do it without another job lined up.



Quote:
Jobs hold many people back as does the perception that you must be continuously employed throughout life.
Employers discriminate against those who are out of work.


Quote:
Do you think the early frontiersman cared much for job security? Or the men who sailed the seas to make it here?
Those days are long gone. Welcome to 2019. You need to get your time machine recalibrated. That trip to the 19th century took a lot out of you.

Quote:
You may suffer as a result but hopefully you will learn from it.
Yeah, you'll learn not to quit a job without having another one lined up, since the people who are working and looking for work are preferred by employers and quitting just cost someone their ability to get a job quicker.

Quote:
Contrary to what everyone else is saying, employers -- particularly hiring managers (not HR ladies) -- do not automatically view the unemployed less favorably for a job.
Actually they do. They stereotype passive candidates (those who have a job but are looking for another) as being worth more than the person who is out of work. They will spend their time, energy and money trying to recruit the passive candidate at a higher rate rather than hiring the active candidate who does not have a job, at a lower rate.

It makes no business sense. This is the insanity of the modern job market.


Quote:
In fact, taking risks, like quitting a job without another, can just as easily be seen as a good thing. .
Nope. It puts people in a financial bind, get less chance of getting their dream job because the passive candidate got it, and it makes them more desperate and likely to take a crappier job.

Quote:
Best yet, start a business.
Unless one has 1) capital 2) sustainable business plan and 3) business acumen, one's business becomes one of the 90 which go belly up in less than 3 years.

Bankruptcy attorneys love your advice!
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Old 07-11-2019, 06:01 AM
 
Location: Richmond, Virginia
179 posts, read 78,455 times
Reputation: 348
^ guys like this will always discourage others from following their intuitions or dreams. Ignore them.

A man either reaches out towards risk and glory or settles into the confines of the expected and ordinary. Always choose action over inaction -- knowing when to leave is smarter than not knowing.

Sometimes you need to take a couple steps backwards (accepting a "lesser" job) to move forward again. So what? Don't be short-sighted.
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Old 07-13-2019, 03:43 AM
 
1,094 posts, read 631,702 times
Reputation: 1970
OK so everyone saying that I have to stay in my job because it's more attractive to recruiters. Why does no one seem interested if I have a job or not?

As soon as an employer posts a job they must be drowned in applications within the first few hours. I get e-mail alerts, I browse every moment I can, I always respond to recruiters, I try to be as quick as possible because they don't want to wait, they want to know yesterday. You have to be FAST and I can't do that with a job.

It can't be me. My experience isn't perfect, my degree isn't great, and maybe my skills could use some updating. But I know my resume is enough to get work in this area. And if there's already tens of thousands of competitors, a lunch break and an hour in the evening simply isn't enough.

Moving from one job to another would be an ideal situation. Maybe that's how it works if you're lucky. The fact is I simply haven't been able to meet enough people or the right people for that ideal situation. This seems more and more like a complete waste of time (and opportunities)
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Old 07-13-2019, 06:25 AM
 
Location: Vermont
1,392 posts, read 471,093 times
Reputation: 2064
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevroqs View Post
Or have at least a year of living expenses saved up before quitting.
yep, I should have included that! but most people don't, at least that I've seen. Why are people not saving money???
Also, I don't think the scenario of working temp jobs in the interim is bad, because I actually did that with a job I quit - not following my own advice and didn't have a job lined up - but I still think it's the best advice - I was lucky and got hired on with the temp firm - then, the 2nd position I took with them was a temp to hire, and I was hired there permanently and worked there for a little over a year before getting hired for a different government position. I put the temp jobs on my resume, was honest about why I left the job I quit, and don't seem to have suffered any negative consequences. But I am honest/forthcoming. I don't lie in interviews. They are either going to accept me as an honest human being, with skills, or they are not. Their loss if they don't. I'm a great employee, if I do say so myself! LOL
I also interview pretty well. You kind of have to develop a skill at that, too.
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Old 07-13-2019, 12:29 PM
 
6,903 posts, read 7,308,990 times
Reputation: 9808
OP, I don't get your last post. It seems like you have a few frustrations -- which I get. But that post was all over the place.
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Old 07-13-2019, 01:21 PM
 
1,094 posts, read 631,702 times
Reputation: 1970
Quote:
Originally Posted by selhars View Post
OP, I don't get your last post. It seems like you have a few frustrations -- which I get. But that post was all over the place.
Sorry, but I'm just so through with this situation. At this point I'm only working to hit savings goals. In terms of survival I could quit any day I want. When is this nightmare going to end?
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Old 07-15-2019, 04:29 PM
 
Location: U.S.A., Earth
4,518 posts, read 2,893,607 times
Reputation: 4048
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobsell View Post
But you won't get as many as you're out of work and employers discriminate against those who are out of work.
.



Cronies are the exception to the catch-22. But 99% of the people are not cronies.



If one is out of work, employers will stereotype them as worthless, so it doesn't matter if they're good at what they do.
At the end of the day, you still gotta try. Otherwise, it's almost as if those who are unemployed may as well just literally give up. Right now. We're talking jump off a bridge, or slit your own throat, some other American "seppuku". Also consider that newly minted graduates manage to get jobs without any prior experience, including no internships, nor summer jobs, nor connections. Your chances are less, but sometimes in life, you need to just make do with what you have. It's more uncommon for everything to be "just perfect" or "just right".

And to reiterate, while you generally do not want to quit without another job lined up, for some people, their current job is soo awful that it would make sense to quit (ie. really long commute, toxic environment)
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