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Old 06-22-2019, 06:44 AM
 
1,091 posts, read 627,481 times
Reputation: 1965

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I can't deal with my job anymore and will resign in the next several weeks. It's a long story but this isn't a great place and I'd rather leave on good terms rather than storming out like many others have.

I have ample savings to survive 3 months before biting into my deeper savings. (Yes I watch the Dave Ramsey show.) But my current job search has failed and I'm trying every day yet I can't seem to land any permanent work.

What are some practical ideas what to do. I'm thinking about applying for temporary work as a kind of interim. Part time work wouldn't be great but it could be an option. What do you do in this situation?
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Old 06-22-2019, 06:50 AM
 
528 posts, read 616,303 times
Reputation: 779
Don't leave until you have a written letter elsewhere.
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Old 06-22-2019, 07:20 AM
 
1,091 posts, read 627,481 times
Reputation: 1965
Quote:
Originally Posted by liveurdream View Post
Don't leave until you have a written letter elsewhere.
That was my firm belief until reality kicked in. It's not fair to do something which makes you feel degraded. Leaving on good terms at this stage is superior to walking out, being fired, or leaving within the first several months, which everyone else has apart from one other guy who has been here a million years and seems to have a reduced level of intelligence. So the decision is clear to me.
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Old 06-22-2019, 10:08 AM
 
1,665 posts, read 547,450 times
Reputation: 3555
Quote:
Originally Posted by dumb View Post
That was my firm belief until reality kicked in. It's not fair to do something which makes you feel degraded. Leaving on good terms at this stage is superior to walking out, being fired, or leaving within the first several months, which everyone else has apart from one other guy who has been here a million years and seems to have a reduced level of intelligence. So the decision is clear to me.
So that's the emotional reaction. Logically, what's the smart decision?

Quitting now means you're without a paycheck when you don't need to be, and it means it becomes significantly harder to find the next job, given the advantage you have being able to say you're not unemployed when interviewing.
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Old 06-22-2019, 11:01 AM
 
36 posts, read 10,899 times
Reputation: 53
Many recruiters favor employed candidates over unemployed ones for some reason.

You mentioned your current job search is failing - so just imagine that minus a current income.

If that seems tolerable than quit.

But I hope you've crafted succinct, tangible reasoning as to what makes your current job so incompatible or else the job search may be a longer one.
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Old 06-22-2019, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
8,579 posts, read 3,001,676 times
Reputation: 12774
I wouldn't. We are long past the era where you can walk out of one job and just go find another that week.

If you're prepared to be unemployed for as long as six months and probably settle for a job that's down-level from what you have now, walk on out.
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Old 06-22-2019, 02:06 PM
 
684 posts, read 248,421 times
Reputation: 1810
Agree with all the posters above. Be patient and tolerant while working there and keep looking for a job somewhere else.

If you quit, you cannot get unemployment benefits and find a new job easily.
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Old 06-22-2019, 02:43 PM
 
469 posts, read 513,452 times
Reputation: 1027
How is quitting going to make your job search easier?
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Old 06-22-2019, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Salt Lake City
1,018 posts, read 1,864,850 times
Reputation: 1081
I agree with everything that has been said so far. I was in a similar situation as you a number of years ago. I got passed over for a promotion, when the manager of my department decided to bring in someone from outside the company to fill a vacancy that would have been the next logical step for me. I was pissed off about not getting the job, and having it given to an outsider with no previous experience in our field! So, abruptly I left my job without having another lined up. That turned out to be a big mistake. It took me over a year to get another FT position, and I also took a pay cut in the new job. You are not in a position of strength with a prospective employer when you approach them being unemployed. If you think it's difficult for you now to find a new job, add to that the stress of having to pay your bills with a part-time or temp position that may not pay as much as you're currently making.

If you absolutely can't take it where you are working now and see no alternative than leaving before you have another job, make a plan for what you're going to do when you leave and waste no time getting to it. Contact some temp agencies and see what they have available that you might qualify for with your background, and if you'll be able to make ends meet with what they'll offer you in pay.
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Old 06-22-2019, 08:04 PM
 
3,283 posts, read 1,340,345 times
Reputation: 6621
I hear you trying to avoid a catastrophe by making a hard, possibly bad, decision. What are the odds of a good reference if you give notice? Or is it a disaster all the way around? Can you stretch your three months' money to six with a low-paying job?

Definitely go to the temp agency if you have nothing else and if that fails, work anywhere at anything. I took a job at the dry cleaner's during the recession. When I went to the temp agency, I put it down and I remember the woman saying, Oh, so you HAVE been working. It wasn't financially ideal, but it was a great breather, and it worked out in the end.
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