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Old 06-24-2019, 08:33 AM
 
1,663 posts, read 547,450 times
Reputation: 3555

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I was in a similar boat a few years ago. I was given a severance package, but got my next job pretty quickly (within the first few weeks of being laid off). I then deferred the start date of the new job until around the time the severance ended. If you can swing it, the time off on severance is a lot more enjoyable if you know you have a job waiting.
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Old 06-24-2019, 08:43 AM
 
242 posts, read 87,967 times
Reputation: 544
I was given 11 months notice of my layoff due to relocation of the office. I was professional and complete in all my work projects during that time. I even helped interview and hire my replacement and then educate him on the key points to investigate for ongoing projects. It was important to me to make certain everything I was involved in was smoothly transitioned. It did help that I had a very generous package for staying.
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Old 06-24-2019, 12:07 PM
 
Location: Kenmore, WA
7,491 posts, read 6,472,008 times
Reputation: 10926
Quote:
Originally Posted by OnOurWayHome View Post
I was laid off from my job last week - job was eliminated. There's a 45 day notice period.

I expect the notice period to be fairly awkward. I'm trying to be professional and transition things to my colleagues- none of this is their fault and I don't want to leave things a mess for them- but my main focus right now is finding another job. I also want to get in all my medical appointments for myself and my son during this time(something we usually do over the summer anyway) so I expect to be using a lot of sick time. There is also a lot to be done HR/administratively with the layoff.

Was anyone ever in this situation? How did you handle it?
Technically I've only been laid off twice, and in both cases I was planning to leave and my employer laid me off so I could receive the benefits, so I probably am not seeing the situation the same as you are. Still, I think you should take your sick time to attend medical appointments. Do your job as if nothing has changed.
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Old 06-24-2019, 04:19 PM
 
Location: Kirkland, WA (Metro Seattle)
3,980 posts, read 3,249,172 times
Reputation: 7048
Quote:
Originally Posted by OnOurWayHome View Post
I was laid off from my job last week - job was eliminated. There's a 45 day notice period.

I expect the notice period to be fairly awkward. I'm trying to be professional and transition things to my colleagues- none of this is their fault and I don't want to leave things a mess for them- but my main focus right now is finding another job. I also want to get in all my medical appointments for myself and my son during this time(something we usually do over the summer anyway) so I expect to be using a lot of sick time. There is also a lot to be done HR/administratively with the layoff.

Was anyone ever in this situation? How did you handle it?
First, bummer. My condolences. I'm one of the most laid off people you know (in technology), so to speak, so I understand. 90% of the time I see it coming due to end of contract or I suspect the position will be eliminated. The other 10% bites.

In 2001, spring, I volunteered to be Group 2, volunteers to be laid off for 1.5X salary every week we stayed to transition. So I stayed about two months and had tidy severance bonus, which was okay at the time: ten, twenty grand or so probably.

My job that two months was insure all automation and etc. was setup properly for my colleague...I don't remember what happened to him, he might have been Group 3 (core) who sank with the ship six months later (I only suspected we were polishing deck chairs on the Titanic; in fact we were. Dot.bomb era, btw).

I wasn't real happy, since we were in a mini-Recession, but it only took me a little while to find another good job and 2001 was a tolerable year after all. I had a couple weeks off in summer and made the most of them, on WA unemployment which paid pretty well (then, and now). I've been lucky (sort of, mostly by choosing wisely) that there is tons of work wherever and whatever I'm doing, since lightning bolts strike from time to time.)

Yes, like you I had one foot out the door during. I'm working alongside a guy now who really doesn't care, he's done end of September (period) and his morale is near-zero. He gets his job done, and does it well, but is massively indifferent and I have to go to him for various (which he supplies: don't get me wrong, he's a good guy, just ...doesn't care).

Do your job, transition efficiently:

- No morale events, skip as many "meetings" and other BS as possible.
- Say little as possible to anyone, add no opinions, contribute little as possible to the conversation.
- Due your duty, but no more than
- Squeeze those benefits until they scream.
- Every sick day is your comp time, schedule them out to the last unless they are part of your exit comp
- Make sure references are squared away.
- Last day everything swept into a box and WALK out saying nothing to anyone except whoever collects your building key, badge, etc. Even them, little as possible. I don't do "exit interviews" unless really important to them ...I've done maybe one in 30 years.

You owe them very little. As Robert E. Lee said, very appropro to this situation: "Do your duty. You cannot do more, and must never do less!"
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Old 06-24-2019, 04:46 PM
 
Location: S.W. Florida
2,204 posts, read 928,712 times
Reputation: 6208
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blondebaerde View Post
First, bummer. My condolences. I'm one of the most laid off people you know (in technology), so to speak, so I understand. 90% of the time I see it coming due to end of contract or I suspect the position will be eliminated. The other 10% bites.

In 2001, spring, I volunteered to be Group 2, volunteers to be laid off for 1.5X salary every week we stayed to transition. So I stayed about two months and had tidy severance bonus, which was okay at the time: ten, twenty grand or so probably.

My job that two months was insure all automation and etc. was setup properly for my colleague...I don't remember what happened to him, he might have been Group 3 (core) who sank with the ship six months later (I only suspected we were polishing deck chairs on the Titanic; in fact we were. Dot.bomb era, btw).

I wasn't real happy, since we were in a mini-Recession, but it only took me a little while to find another good job and 2001 was a tolerable year after all. I had a couple weeks off in summer and made the most of them, on WA unemployment which paid pretty well (then, and now). I've been lucky (sort of, mostly by choosing wisely) that there is tons of work wherever and whatever I'm doing, since lightning bolts strike from time to time.)

Yes, like you I had one foot out the door during. I'm working alongside a guy now who really doesn't care, he's done end of September (period) and his morale is near-zero. He gets his job done, and does it well, but is massively indifferent and I have to go to him for various (which he supplies: don't get me wrong, he's a good guy, just ...doesn't care).

Do your job, transition efficiently:

- No morale events, skip as many "meetings" and other BS as possible.
- Say little as possible to anyone, add no opinions, contribute little as possible to the conversation.
- Due your duty, but no more than
- Squeeze those benefits until they scream.
- Every sick day is your comp time, schedule them out to the last unless they are part of your exit comp
- Make sure references are squared away.
- Last day everything swept into a box and WALK out saying nothing to anyone except whoever collects your building key, badge, etc. Even them, little as possible. I don't do "exit interviews" unless really important to them ...I've done maybe one in 30 years.

You owe them very little. As Robert E. Lee said, very appropro to this situation: "Do your duty. You cannot do more, and must never do less!"
Wow. With advice like this, your exit would be expedited like you wouldnít believe if I were your supervisor. Until the day you leave for the last time you OWE your employer everything youíve owed them for every other day you worked for the company. Which from the sound of things you deem to be very little.
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Old 06-24-2019, 06:47 PM
 
38,070 posts, read 14,878,695 times
Reputation: 24502
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blondebaerde View Post
First, bummer. My condolences. I'm one of the most laid off people you know (in technology), so to speak, so I understand. 90% of the time I see it coming due to end of contract or I suspect the position will be eliminated. The other 10% bites.

In 2001, spring, I volunteered to be Group 2, volunteers to be laid off for 1.5X salary every week we stayed to transition. So I stayed about two months and had tidy severance bonus, which was okay at the time: ten, twenty grand or so probably.

My job that two months was insure all automation and etc. was setup properly for my colleague...I don't remember what happened to him, he might have been Group 3 (core) who sank with the ship six months later (I only suspected we were polishing deck chairs on the Titanic; in fact we were. Dot.bomb era, btw).

I wasn't real happy, since we were in a mini-Recession, but it only took me a little while to find another good job and 2001 was a tolerable year after all. I had a couple weeks off in summer and made the most of them, on WA unemployment which paid pretty well (then, and now). I've been lucky (sort of, mostly by choosing wisely) that there is tons of work wherever and whatever I'm doing, since lightning bolts strike from time to time.)

Yes, like you I had one foot out the door during. I'm working alongside a guy now who really doesn't care, he's done end of September (period) and his morale is near-zero. He gets his job done, and does it well, but is massively indifferent and I have to go to him for various (which he supplies: don't get me wrong, he's a good guy, just ...doesn't care).

Do your job, transition efficiently:

- No morale events, skip as many "meetings" and other BS as possible.
- Say little as possible to anyone, add no opinions, contribute little as possible to the conversation.
- Due your duty, but no more than
- Squeeze those benefits until they scream.
- Every sick day is your comp time, schedule them out to the last unless they are part of your exit comp
- Make sure references are squared away.
- Last day everything swept into a box and WALK out saying nothing to anyone except whoever collects your building key, badge, etc. Even them, little as possible. I don't do "exit interviews" unless really important to them ...I've done maybe one in 30 years.

You owe them very little. As Robert E. Lee said, very appropro to this situation: "Do your duty. You cannot do more, and must never do less!"
This is great advice.

Get your work done and don't be wasting time chatting with your soon-to-be-former coworkers. What is there to say, really? No need to waste work time on layoff talk.

Though I would suggest saying good-by to folks as you head out the door. Seems only civil.

Skip the exit interviews. They have no interest in your opinion on matters. Just go.
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Old 06-24-2019, 09:04 PM
 
354 posts, read 689,567 times
Reputation: 507
My old job had constant layoffs so they had the routine down to a science:

Youíre told you are being laid off
You get 60 days notice
You have a week or two to wrap things up
At the end of transition period, you turn in your ID, computer, etc and leave the building for good
From that point on, your job is to find another job. You are still on payroll, until the 60 days are up, but they clearly donít want you around
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Old 06-25-2019, 06:22 AM
 
3,718 posts, read 2,129,453 times
Reputation: 4288
It's going to be uncomfortable. I once got laid off mid month, and the last day of that month was slated to be my last day. I had to perform my job duties as normal, but with no assurances of income in the future and an arduous job search ahead of me. I was also laid off in September, meaning that I would have to interview for jobs near the holidays, which in the office world means that interviewing slows down in November and December.

All one can do in that situation is say nothing and wait for the misery to end.

I filed for unemployment in early October and had a job offer in January of the next year, The time off ended up being rather refreshing and the next job worked out well.
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Old 06-25-2019, 07:38 AM
 
2,387 posts, read 683,329 times
Reputation: 3374
Do good work.

Get references from people at that job that will vouch for you and you have a good relationship with.

Keep doing good work.

Update your resume. ATS optimize it. Get a mail.com address (looks more professional with their 200+ domains). Do a job search and make sure you let the recruiters know you're currently employed.

DO NOT MENTION THE LAYOFF until you've already been laid off. While employed, when they ask you why you're looking, just say you're looking to see what's out there.
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Old 06-25-2019, 09:59 AM
 
9,248 posts, read 11,799,248 times
Reputation: 14504
Just remember, a lay off is a automatic qualification for unemployment insurance benefits. But, if you take he advice of fools and idiots by screwing up and not performing to a standard you previously did, your employer may decide to save some money and fire you for misconduct and that means your benefits are out the window. If that happens, not only did you throw away money while seeking other work, you may also have thrown away any positive references from your former employer. Think like a mature adult and not some schoolkid who was told recess is over!
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