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Old 06-26-2019, 11:31 AM
 
3,247 posts, read 842,766 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annabanana123 View Post
Iím in tech in the RTP area of NC. We usually opt for the local candidate to avoid paying relocation. Itís almost always easier to get hired after you move but I would still keep trying. Try larger companies that need your specific skill set. I would put something on your resume about looking forward to a move to the east coast or something. Maybe that would help. We have hired from CA and paid relocation for the right person but not if we have a local option.
Assuming a remote candidate would not ask for relocation... well... I'm not sure the discussion would even get that far, unless you identified a candidate of higher caliber than was available locally. Would it?
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Old 06-26-2019, 12:17 PM
 
1,218 posts, read 1,490,937 times
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Lets say I relocate to one city and start at a small company, I buy a brand new house for $450k, then spend $30k on the backyard with pool. That is $480k. Then a year later if I'm still there, one manager from 50 miles away decides to hire me to "save on relocation". I can sell that house for $440k, since for 450 people could buy a completely unused one. I would lose $40k, that would be considered for my relocation cost for the 50 miles. How did anyone in this situation "saved" on relocation?

Another thing that managers never ever consider is the cost of bad decisions. A design engineer on a $2M project makes $130k in Florida, but if he is not a superstar then all that $2M will be wasted, the projected $10M revenue from that product will never materialize, that is a $12M loss for the company. If they paid $10k relocation, they could have saved $12M. Or even worse, if they offered the job without the $10k relocation, they would have lost 1cent (cost of sending an email and your time), but the candidate might have relocated on his own expense anyway. Even our management refuses to spend extra $10/product, when the product is $200k a unit, and we loose millions in production because of the corner cutting. Stupidity is rampant.

I have considered my skills every day since I started my career, I was not living in a silo. Other people I know considered it also and gave me feedback. I interviewed many people also. I'm on the top of the heap. Almost all linkedin profiles i found in the area (that already work at the companies I applied to) have a fraction of my technology experience, while some companies aim for silicon valley level products.
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Old 06-26-2019, 12:48 PM
 
3,069 posts, read 3,182,170 times
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What companies don't am for is Silicon Valley Egos. The whole idea that nobody else is as smart as they are. And as someone else mentioned folks want to get the same salaries when they move to an area with a lower housing cost and a lower COL. Especially when you are coming to me to look for a job. If I have a specific need and have to go out to Silicon Valley ( or the Washington DC Tech Corridor or anywhere else) I expect to have to entice someone to move where we are. For that I may have to pay above market rates and pay relocation costs. But I would rather take some of my top performers and pay to improve there skills. Doing that I have a better idea that they will remain and not skip out to another company or area at the first chance.

My worry is that some of my talent will get wooed away to one of the ego areas. A few have. Some have come back within a couple years because they decided the trade off wasn't worth it (One even brought several others over the next year who saw how happy he was here combined with what he got to work on.
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Old 06-26-2019, 01:18 PM
 
10,058 posts, read 4,648,803 times
Reputation: 15275
Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
A lot may be your salary preferences. Most companies here in the south east may just assume they can't afford you since you're used to Silicon Valley salary.
I'm thinking the salary issue is part of it as well, even his drop in salary might not be a large enough drop?

plus, when i think of tech companies on the east coast, I think of finance or biotech. So it's different than the west coast tech (internet/startup/automation) companies. maybe his tech skills are in the wrong tech for the east coast without starting from lower on the ladder rung/salary level
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Old 06-26-2019, 01:35 PM
 
3,602 posts, read 1,554,600 times
Reputation: 2524
Quote:
Originally Posted by buenos View Post
Lets say I relocate to one city and start at a small company, I buy a brand new house for $450k, then spend $30k on the backyard with pool. That is $480k. Then a year later if I'm still there, one manager from 50 miles away decides to hire me to "save on relocation". I can sell that house for $440k, since for 450 people could buy a completely unused one. I would lose $40k, that would be considered for my relocation cost for the 50 miles. How did anyone in this situation "saved" on relocation?

Another thing that managers never ever consider is the cost of bad decisions. A design engineer on a $2M project makes $130k in Florida, but if he is not a superstar then all that $2M will be wasted, the projected $10M revenue from that product will never materialize, that is a $12M loss for the company. If they paid $10k relocation, they could have saved $12M. Or even worse, if they offered the job without the $10k relocation, they would have lost 1cent (cost of sending an email and your time), but the candidate might have relocated on his own expense anyway. Even our management refuses to spend extra $10/product, when the product is $200k a unit, and we loose millions in production because of the corner cutting. Stupidity is rampant.

I have considered my skills every day since I started my career, I was not living in a silo. Other people I know considered it also and gave me feedback. I interviewed many people also. I'm on the top of the heap. Almost all linkedin profiles i found in the area (that already work at the companies I applied to) have a fraction of my technology experience, while some companies aim for silicon valley level products.
If you at top of the heap and cannot get a referral from other than your brother or cousin, then may be you need to get higher than that.

And I find it ironical to get lectured from a Silicon Valley transplant about budgeting, cost and expenditure. Many SV startups dont mind about that free food, relocation, macbooks, tees only to become history in few months

YOu should however apply to companies in Austin. They have the SV nonsense + Texas sense
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Old 06-26-2019, 01:53 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,484 posts, read 62,084,629 times
Reputation: 32131
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddm2k View Post
Assuming a remote candidate would not ask for relocation... well... I'm not sure the discussion would even get that far,
unless you identified a candidate of higher caliber than was available locally. Would it?
This just feeds back into the ego game that trips up so many (like the OP).
The judgment is whether they can identify a candidate of adequate caliber locally.

The presumption and most of the common evidence and anecdotes says: If they can they're done.
It's only when they can't get adequate locally that they'll expand their search horizons.
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Old 06-26-2019, 01:54 PM
 
2,052 posts, read 594,159 times
Reputation: 2905
Quote:
Originally Posted by buenos View Post
Another thing that managers never ever consider is the cost of bad decisions. A design engineer on a $2M project makes $130k in Florida, but if he is not a superstar then all that $2M will be wasted, the projected $10M revenue from that product will never materialize, that is a $12M loss for the company. If they paid $10k relocation, they could have saved $12M. .
I'm struggling with this significantly.

I have seen companies do this time and time again and there seems to be concerted effort to hide and actively NOT measure the impact of poor decisions of management. HR, leadership, NOBODY wants to look or even think of a way to calculate that.
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Old 06-26-2019, 01:57 PM
 
2,052 posts, read 594,159 times
Reputation: 2905
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
This just feeds back into the ego game that trips up so many (like the OP).
The judgment is whether they can identify a candidate of adequate caliber locally. If they can they're done.
There is a TREMENDOUS dearth of specialized digital talent (talking ALL of digital from front to back end web tech, marketing to SEO, content and everything in-between) in Florida and from what I've seen there are a plethora of people READY AND WILLING to relocate given the right relo package, but Orlando and South Florida companies are dead set on not budging on that. Some will not even budge on relo for NC/SC/TX applicants which would probably ask for considerably less than NY/MA/NJ applicants.
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Old 06-26-2019, 02:14 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,484 posts, read 62,084,629 times
Reputation: 32131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tencent View Post
...but Orlando and South Florida companies are dead set on not budging (on relocation)...
So tell them they're running their business poorly and should do what you say.
My comment is about what they're actually doing whether it works for them or not.
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Old 06-26-2019, 02:17 PM
 
1,218 posts, read 1,490,937 times
Reputation: 813
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tencent View Post
... but Orlando and South Florida companies are dead set on not budging on that. Some will not even budge on relo for NC/SC/TX applicants which would probably ask for considerably less than NY/MA/NJ applicants.
Tell me more about that. Did you hear any specific stories? Why is this anyway?

For the EGO issue, is I think in places that are not world class tech centers, people have a bigger EGO that is not based on solid ground. When they see a silicon valley guy, they immediately have the impulse to "stick it to the man", and show that "we in X town are smarter than those XYZ in Silicon Valley". It is like when the hillbilly sits on the front porch all day, and once he sees a car in the distance he starts shooting immediately.
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