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Old 06-29-2019, 02:01 PM
 
128 posts, read 134,658 times
Reputation: 174

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I've tried everything to work and it keeps ending in failure(Journalism, LPN,Navy, Commercial Truck driving) so what about this. I don't believe in curses,but I'm beginning to since this keeps happening to me.

What are the pros and cons of this program?

I know that are closed for this term,but new applications start next year.

Please don't mention how the money isn't enough. I am one person no dependents, and the only debt I have is student loans($10,000) which thankfully are in forbearance. A teachers salary would be enough for me.

What are the personal hurdles I would face because of the things below. I mean would I get rejected because of them.

I'm female

No children.

I'm 33 will be 34 early next year.

I have a BA in Journalism.

I live in the South

I'm currently talking to a psychiatrist about some things and may take a med. Do any potential employers need to know this? Does Teach for America need to know this? Is it even legal for them to?

I have no actually work history.

I would like to enter a completely online Masters Program while I teach. I want it to be in Library Science so I can be a librarian.

However, if I like teaching enough I will stay doing that and will do all the paperwork, tests they want etc.

I will absolutely pick their high need places to be placed in if need be.

However, what are some good places to be placed in if I can't be placed in a high needs one?

I would like to teach kindergarten or 1st grade.
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Old 06-29-2019, 04:24 PM
 
Location: on the wind
7,086 posts, read 2,905,107 times
Reputation: 23949
You can't just "decide" to start teaching. You need credentials. Start reading here:

https://teach.com/become/teaching-cr...-requirements/
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Old 06-29-2019, 05:05 PM
 
3,961 posts, read 1,690,813 times
Reputation: 8040
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parnassia View Post
You can't just "decide" to start teaching. You need credentials. Start reading here:

https://teach.com/become/teaching-cr...-requirements/
The OP is talking about Teach for America, which has no specific credentials other than a bachelorís degree with a relatively modest GPA and authorization to work in the US. That said, it is very competitive and you are placed where you are needed. I think you select where you would like to go and then they look at your major/educational background to determine what you are most qualified to teach. Itís not like a regular job where you apply to the school district of choice or position of choice.

There are some alternatives to this program. I think NYC, Boston, and Chicago have their own programs for people who specifically want to work in that area. Notre Dame runs the Catholic version. It is heavily advertised to students there, but I donít think it is limited.

However, I think the main thing they want out of anyone in these programs is someone who is going to be able to make it through the full two-year commitment. I tried several careers before landing in my current one, so I know it can be hard, but if you are going to TFA so you can eventually go to school to be a librarian, that might be a problem. A lot of people end up doing just that, but probably your best bet is to talk to a therapist about why it is you keep jumping from one career to another.
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Old 06-29-2019, 05:33 PM
 
Location: Worcester MA
1,810 posts, read 311,944 times
Reputation: 1844
I suspect the main cons would be the dealing with:
horrible school system
unsupportive principal
burnt out teachers
terrible parents
challenging students
plus things like crime, poverty, lack of supplies
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Old 06-29-2019, 05:42 PM
 
128 posts, read 134,658 times
Reputation: 174
Quote:
Originally Posted by RamenAddict View Post
The OP is talking about Teach for America, which has no specific credentials other than a bachelor’s degree with a relatively modest GPA and authorization to work in the US. That said, it is very competitive and you are placed where you are needed. I think you select where you would like to go and then they look at your major/educational background to determine what you are most qualified to teach. It’s not like a regular job where you apply to the school district of choice or position of choice.

There are some alternatives to this program. I think NYC, Boston, and Chicago have their own programs for people who specifically want to work in that area. Notre Dame runs the Catholic version. It is heavily advertised to students there, but I don’t think it is limited.

However, I think the main thing they want out of anyone in these programs is someone who is going to be able to make it through the full two-year commitment. I tried several careers before landing in my current one, so I know it can be hard, but if you are going to TFA so you can eventually go to school to be a librarian, that might be a problem. A lot of people end up doing just that, but probably your best bet is to talk to a therapist about why it is you keep jumping from one career to another.
If I am accepted they will get the full two years from me. I was in the Navy and signed a contract for them for four years. Working for someone for a set number of years has never been a problem for me.

I also said that if I liked the teaching after my two years I will stay in the field,but if not a Masters in Library Science will be my backup.

I am not jumping from career to career. I get in these good programs and then some crap happens, and I end of not finishing it. Like I've stated I'm seriously beginning to believe I'm cursed because this keeps happening to me.

Journalism-dying industry
LPN- let go two days before graduation. Tried to appeal to the dean and president to no avail.
Commercial Truck Driving- was in the program(actually behind a 18 wheeler) and had to drop out because I can't drive shift. Just automatic.
Navy- got all the way through boot camp to the point I had to see my division graduate. They finally had to let me go because I couldn't pass their swimming qualifications.
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Old 06-29-2019, 05:43 PM
 
57 posts, read 16,328 times
Reputation: 225
There's no way in hell I'd teach in an "underprivileged" inner-city school. The "students", if you want to call them that, aren't interested in learning and the parents don't care. Also, those schools have tall fences and metal detectors for a reason. A lot of the "students" will end up in prison.

If you want to be a teacher, get your teaching certificate and go work at a school in the suburbs.
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Old 06-29-2019, 08:14 PM
 
2,067 posts, read 1,148,776 times
Reputation: 4752
https://www.huffpost.com/entry/advic...s-do_b_8840714

https://www.theatlantic.com/educatio...merica/279724/

I've not heard much good about the program.
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Old 06-30-2019, 07:04 AM
 
Location: Texas
35,209 posts, read 19,272,053 times
Reputation: 20835
The big negative:


Some school districts will hire TFA kids repeatedly rather than fill openings with certified teachers for the simple reason that they're much cheaper. Students end up with a succession of rookies and professional teachers just go elsewhere since that district avoids hiring them. It becomes a vicious cycle of high turnover.
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Old 06-30-2019, 04:47 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,875 posts, read 42,085,992 times
Reputation: 43276
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Gringo View Post
The big negative:


Some school districts will hire TFA kids repeatedly rather than fill openings with certified teachers for the simple reason that they're much cheaper. Students end up with a succession of rookies and professional teachers just go elsewhere since that district avoids hiring them. It becomes a vicious cycle of high turnover.
There's that and the fact that many TFA participants are dilettantes who plan on doing their two years, mostly for the tuition forgiveness, and then leave to get on with their true "life's work" (banking, law, Foreign Service, whatever).

They get a six week lab school training course during the summer and then parachuted into a high needs school (mostly. My very middle/upper middle class suburban DC school got a handful one year. None lasted the year). We didn't do well with career changers either.
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Old 06-30-2019, 07:54 PM
 
11,118 posts, read 8,527,266 times
Reputation: 28065
With your background, this isn't going to work for you. Someone who has never worked any job, no teaching background, and with documented psychiatric issues will not make a good teacher.
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