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Old 07-02-2019, 09:15 PM
 
Location: Houston
1,717 posts, read 599,948 times
Reputation: 1510

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This seems to be common at my work, especially among management. For example, we have a male manager who closes his e-mails with “K” for Ken, a female who uses the “O” in her first name In her closings. If they happen to have initials that actually spell a word, they are hooked and ALWAYS use their cutesy initials. When did this trend start? Is it pretty common?. I had never seen a fellow employee, especially not Management in the early part of my working years. Such a thing would have seemed like “ high school”- lol.
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Old 07-02-2019, 09:22 PM
 
Location: Western Washington
9,126 posts, read 8,526,116 times
Reputation: 15812
Not common in my experience. I will sign handwritten notes or document markups with my initials, but not email.

I don't typically receive emails signed with initials.
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Old 07-03-2019, 02:37 AM
 
Location: on the wind
7,457 posts, read 3,097,226 times
Reputation: 25202
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hopelesscause View Post
This seems to be common at my work, especially among management. For example, we have a male manager who closes his e-mails with “K” for Ken, a female who uses the “O” in her first name In her closings. If they happen to have initials that actually spell a word, they are hooked and ALWAYS use their cutesy initials. When did this trend start? Is it pretty common?. I had never seen a fellow employee, especially not Management in the early part of my working years. Such a thing would have seemed like “ high school”- lol.
Can't say I've ever seen someone do this.
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Old 07-03-2019, 06:42 AM
 
111 posts, read 25,329 times
Reputation: 131
I'll take the flip side of this one - I do it every day, as do many people here, our clients, and our vendors.

It's just a (very) quick way of signaling to the reader that the message has ended, without the formality of my signature when
everyone knows who an email is from. Emails, being a cut-n-paste business many times, really should be "ended" so we know you didn't just click send by mistake.

The top of the email is the same - you know it's to YOU - I don't need to waste time typing, "Dear Honorable Sir Henry...".

No. Instead, it starts with "H" - nothing more - so you know this is the start of the message.

This is especially helpful if this message is sent to two or three people, so instead of "Charlie, Melissa, Robert" it's just "C/M/R."

When sending dozens of emails a day while reading many more, it's also a time saver for all involved.

I'm not sure anyone here ever thought it was silly - when writing a note by hand (at home) I have always ended it with my first initial only. Same reason though.
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Old 07-03-2019, 07:27 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
5,961 posts, read 7,088,634 times
Reputation: 8749
I sign emails with my full initials (3 letters) except for when it's a person note (where I use my first name).
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Old 07-03-2019, 07:28 AM
 
Location: Brentwood, Tennessee
43,731 posts, read 42,365,139 times
Reputation: 84335
Quote:
Originally Posted by roodd279 View Post
I'll take the flip side of this one - I do it every day, as do many people here, our clients, and our vendors.

It's just a (very) quick way of signaling to the reader that the message has ended, without the formality of my signature when
everyone knows who an email is from. Emails, being a cut-n-paste business many times, really should be "ended" so we know you didn't just click send by mistake.

The top of the email is the same - you know it's to YOU - I don't need to waste time typing, "Dear Honorable Sir Henry...".

No. Instead, it starts with "H" - nothing more - so you know this is the start of the message.

This is especially helpful if this message is sent to two or three people, so instead of "Charlie, Melissa, Robert" it's just "C/M/R."

When sending dozens of emails a day while reading many more, it's also a time saver for all involved.

I'm not sure anyone here ever thought it was silly - when writing a note by hand (at home) I have always ended it with my first initial only. Same reason though.
Yep, not cutesy or "high school." Just shorthand.
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Old 07-03-2019, 07:29 AM
 
728 posts, read 268,988 times
Reputation: 1919
When my top boss sends out formal and serious emails, he has his signature with the company's logo, his full name, title, phone, fax number and work email address. When he sends out not serious emails, like when he needs some documents retrieved for him, or an announcement about the company's picnic, he signs with his initial only (even in lower case letter)

We feel he's very humble. He's very nice, kind and approachable. But when there are problems, he's very serious and strict. No one can or dares to fool him.

When I send emails to outside of the company, I sign with my formal signature as everybody else. For internal emails, I sign with my first name mostly because everybody knows who I am. It does not make sense to me when you send out an email with only a very short sentence and with 4, 5 lines of a formal signature.

Last edited by AnOrdinaryCitizen; 07-03-2019 at 07:51 AM..
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Old 07-03-2019, 07:35 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
22,699 posts, read 24,323,678 times
Reputation: 49400
I'll sign an email with just my first initial usually if it's a casual note to a colleague I work with closely. I follow more professional correspondence rules otherwise.
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Old 07-03-2019, 07:37 AM
 
Location: San Diego
35,698 posts, read 32,461,018 times
Reputation: 20108
We had two people at work so "special" they changed their email to one word. So, doing a search or including them in any email is a real PITA. Not professional at all. This isn't social media it's work.

If your name is Tony Smith then so be it. It's not TONI
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Old 07-03-2019, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,976 posts, read 17,850,564 times
Reputation: 28084
I know a couple of people that do this, but it's by no means standard. If someone regularly uses the initial, like J. Edgar Hoover, you'd see it more.
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