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Old 07-05-2019, 09:59 PM
 
Location: Revere, MA
294 posts, read 992,075 times
Reputation: 213

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Can my employer refuse to schedule their employees for more than 28 hours per week so that the company doesn't have to provide insurance benefits?
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Old 07-05-2019, 10:08 PM
Status: "Disagreeing is not the same thing as trolling." (set 12 days ago)
 
Location: Texas
9,548 posts, read 3,660,304 times
Reputation: 19582
A lot of employers do this. It's legal. I would find a new job if you need health benefits.
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Old 07-05-2019, 10:17 PM
 
691 posts, read 252,072 times
Reputation: 1816
It depends on the position you were hired - casual or permanent line.

If you were hired as casual, no matter how many hours you work, you are not entitled for benefits. Your employer does not have to guarantee to give you how many hours. They call you when they need you, when somebody calls in sick or goes on vacation.

If you were hired as 0.4 or 0.5 FTE (the employer will guarantee for you to have 32 or 40 hours in two weeks, and you can pick up more hours when you want), then you will have benefits (prorated) after three-month probation.
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Old 07-05-2019, 10:33 PM
 
Location: Ohio
178 posts, read 31,187 times
Reputation: 67
AOC, I disagree. "At Will" hiring means "At will" hours, take away or add hours. Hiring full or part time has no bearing unless state law requires otherwise for what is considered FT, even then, if applicable, reduction to part time hours is legal and discretionary.
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Old 07-06-2019, 06:56 AM
 
9,778 posts, read 16,986,698 times
Reputation: 18395
Of course it's legal. Were you hired as a part time employee, or a full time employee?
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Old 07-06-2019, 10:01 AM
Status: "Disagreeing is not the same thing as trolling." (set 12 days ago)
 
Location: Texas
9,548 posts, read 3,660,304 times
Reputation: 19582
Quote:
Originally Posted by LTU2 View Post
AOC, I disagree. "At Will" hiring means "At will" hours, take away or add hours. Hiring full or part time has no bearing unless state law requires otherwise for what is considered FT, even then, if applicable, reduction to part time hours is legal and discretionary.
That's what I was thinking also.
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Old 07-06-2019, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Seattle
1,784 posts, read 1,020,043 times
Reputation: 3057
AOC is confusing some internal practice/policy as employment law.

Not correct.

There is no universal law that dictates how many hours an employer must give you.
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Old 07-06-2019, 02:27 PM
 
Location: Dark Side of the Moon
177 posts, read 35,216 times
Reputation: 501
It's legal. They do it at my university as well, hiring adjunct profs to teach fewer than a full load so they can deny benies.

I think this tactic reflects one of many contributing factors in the wealth disparity today within the States. Part-time jobs before the 1970s were primarily those after school, retirees, summer, or weekenders; today, many prime workers must work multiple part-time positions, but they still need to live with their parents because they can't pay rent, car, insurance, and food.

It's a shameful practice that reflects corporate greed, imo.
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Old 07-06-2019, 04:37 PM
 
Location: Washington state
5,440 posts, read 2,764,764 times
Reputation: 16373
Not only is it legal, but many companies deliberately cut their full-time employees to just under the required hours so they don't have to pay benefits. Wait till they cut your shifts to 4 hours per week.

Face it - you work for a jerk company.
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Old 07-06-2019, 05:06 PM
 
6,208 posts, read 2,868,513 times
Reputation: 15721
Silly rabbit, most here are deluding two main facts and stating only one exist.
Once hired you enter into a mutual contract agreement. They are required to pay you. Provide a safe environment,follow federal labor laws and yes,if you both agreed to full time status that must be maintained. They are to notify full stat employees in advance if benefits are being cut. Hours cut to part time require notice . Sometimes the person can actually get partial unemployment for the difference . It needs to be unilateral though. It is usually though exempt for small business. 50 employees or less.
I've yet to read of a company being fined or arrested for the cutting hours. Is usually labor unions that really are the protective of employees and hours. Folks really need to reconsiderate that unions have protected the employee in many ways.
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