U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
Old 08-06-2008, 05:02 PM
 
Location: NY-> AZ-> NC->PA
489 posts, read 1,107,136 times
Reputation: 131
Question Why do job applications ask if it is OK to contact my 'current' employer?

Can anyone fill me in on this? I don't understand why anyone would want a prospective new employer to be allowed to contact my current employer? I have filled out applications asking for my current supervisor's name and phone number. Then there's that question of "Is it permissable to contact your current employer?" If my supervisor received a call asking about me and my work habits, etc (which are fine, I've never had a problem), and he figured out I was looking to leave, I'd get fired on the spot.

So, is there something I'm missing here?

Do these potential new employers just want to contact an HR dept to verify that I do indeed work where I say I work? Couldn't that get back to my supervisor as well?

I went on one interview when I lived in Arizona (for the State of Arizona) and they said that if they couldn't call my current employer I wouldn't be considered for the position. I don't understand this...

If anyone out there who can explain this to me, please do. Thanks!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-06-2008, 05:21 PM
 
Location: Marion, IN
8,192 posts, read 18,543,287 times
Reputation: 6585
Not everyone is looking for a job on the sly. Many people have been told that their job is going away in xxx days, or have been honest with their current employer and let them know that they are looking.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-06-2008, 08:24 PM
 
Location: Maryland
1,668 posts, read 5,125,665 times
Reputation: 1468
If the prospective employer wants to contact your current employer, he doesn't need your permission. I think they ask to see if you're going to be looking for a better job with them too, and hide that fact. I always put yes, except once I said no. The "no" never called back.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-06-2008, 10:35 PM
 
Location: Major Metro
1,086 posts, read 1,442,158 times
Reputation: 336
Quote:
Originally Posted by ESFP View Post
If the prospective employer wants to contact your current employer, he doesn't need your permission.
The prospective employer can face problems by contacting a current employer without permission. In many cases, employers have policies against conducting such checks before an offer (at least verbal contingent on background). The whole internet (facebook, myspace, etc) thing for background checks is is old news like someone said previously. I read articles on this at least a couple of years ago when Microsoft mentioned googling people as part of their background process. It clearly hasn't stirred so much controversy that we're seeing lawsuits. When that happens, we will probably start seeing some laws passed related to this.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2008, 03:47 PM
 
Location: Long Island
966 posts, read 1,053,084 times
Reputation: 311
Quote:
Originally Posted by ESFP View Post
If the prospective employer wants to contact your current employer, he doesn't need your permission. I think they ask to see if you're going to be looking for a better job with them too, and hide that fact. I always put yes, except once I said no. The "no" never called back.

I have always put "no" and never had a problem.

But really most employers know there are many reason why a person would not want you to contact their current employer. The biggest reason being if you are not hired by the new job you may be making you situation at you old job bad. Anything from being given less responsibly since may or may not be leaving. To be fired before you had a chance to find a new job.

Now saying "no" to contacting your current employer is different from saying "no" to contacting any of your past employers.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2008, 07:55 PM
 
40,871 posts, read 42,017,499 times
Reputation: 12247
A current employer may not answer anyhting unless you gave permission. But tehn you may not get the job either if they can't.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $79,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top