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Old 08-09-2008, 09:24 PM
 
25,170 posts, read 33,503,551 times
Reputation: 6690
Oh, I see. Absolutely could be true in my friend's case. She is very professional and conservative and I was astounded by the firing. Probably some coworkers or the boss were threatened....and unethical to begin with but thanks

Quote:
Originally Posted by twixcookie View Post
artsy, I understand what you are saying...sometimes, it doesn't have much to do with the person who got fired at all.
I think you are on the right track.
Most of the time, people aren't playing fair out there, and this is what happens.
It seems on here that people are trying to show that your friend was somehow at fault, but I will say this...I have seen some really bad stuff go on and not one of those people lost their jobs. I have heard of patients complaining about someone, and they didn't lose their job. I have seen some get nasty and downright rude with them, and they didn't lose their job. So, if your friend was brand new on the job, I bet she was savvy enough to walk a fine line during her probation period.

Someone felt threatened and wanted her out of there and fast.
People can be very cruel, and not even feel any remorse at what they do....
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Old 08-10-2008, 01:29 AM
 
Location: Midwest
799 posts, read 1,350,541 times
Reputation: 216
Yep, you can count on that...they will smile at you and be friendly, but they are holding a huge dagger behind their backs...
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Old 08-16-2008, 06:11 AM
 
98 posts, read 213,559 times
Reputation: 67
Someone very close to me was hired by a "major company" everyone has heard of them. He had a probation period of 45 days, on the 44th day they let him go. No reason at all, just said it wasn't a good fit for the company. He made some calls and found out that if a company tells you they have a probation period upfront they can let you go without reason. People are not considered permanent employees until after the 45 days. That was a shocker, no notice nothing at all they called him into the office and gave him the axe. He was the only income in the home with 3 kids. OUCH!
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Old 08-16-2008, 08:06 AM
 
Location: a swanky suburb in my fancy pants
3,391 posts, read 4,519,933 times
Reputation: 1483
That happened to me once and it was a shock because I knew I was learning quickly and doing a great job. They used the same excuse, I was on probation and not a good fit. It really shook my self confidence. I later found out that the person I had replaced crapped out in their new job and was being bounced back into the spot I had taken so I became redundant. I wish they had told me that.
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Old 08-16-2008, 10:04 AM
 
8,169 posts, read 21,392,136 times
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And I've been on the other side of that "probationary period" as the sole breadwinner for my family ... I hired on to a company as a working foreman/shop manager which had lost their prior shop manager of 15 years. The place needed a lot of hands on management to stem the losses that were being generated in the service department, which should have been a "profit center" for the business.

Before three weeks were over, I knew that the expectations of the company owners, given the limitations they imposed upon me and their interference, would make my job impossible. They thought they knew how to run (and perform the hands on tasks of a) service department effectively, but they were only good in the front side sales of their business. The owners were the reason their business was losing money and why the prior shop foreman could never meet his sales volume quota for the "bonus" incentive pay, and .... as I later found out when he and I met at another shop oneday, the reason he quit.

So, without an adverse record upon my employment history ... I "fired them", gave two weeks notice and left for another opportunity.

As a shop owner, I can tell you that "good employees" are hard to find, even today. Throughout my entire blue-collar career, I was always able to find a decent paying job within days of wanting one. As a business owner, finding and retaining good help was always a challenge .... I could have left the business behind with multiple job offers in hand anytime; in some years, I would have made much more money with less hassles by going to work for someone else.

Probationary periods work both ways ....
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Old 08-16-2008, 01:10 PM
 
8,424 posts, read 23,806,424 times
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I can tell within the first week of new hires who is going and who is staying.
Anyone can slap down a good resume and first impression. But proof is in the workday.

Many older people that re-enter the workforce I find move way too slow in body and training or learning. I hate to fire people like that. But business is business.
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Old 08-16-2008, 07:57 PM
 
25,170 posts, read 33,503,551 times
Reputation: 6690
cold man cold

Quote:
Originally Posted by pitt_transplant View Post
I can tell within the first week of new hires who is going and who is staying.
Anyone can slap down a good resume and first impression. But proof is in the workday.

Many older people that re-enter the workforce I find move way too slow in body and training or learning. I hate to fire people like that. But business is business.
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Old 08-16-2008, 10:08 PM
 
266 posts, read 707,549 times
Reputation: 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by pitt_transplant View Post
I can tell within the first week of new hires who is going and who is staying.
Anyone can slap down a good resume and first impression. But proof is in the workday.

Many older people that re-enter the workforce I find move way too slow in body and training or learning. I hate to fire people like that. But business is business.
So what if an older worker takes longer to learn? Everyone has a learning curve. Wouldn't it be more beneficial to take the time to train a person properly and then determine if they are contributing to the company?

Recruiting is expensive, so why would you want to shoot the company in the foot by constantly having to hire replacements for workers that could have been great, if only you'd given them the chance. You will never know!

Older workers have life experience to contribute, and will probably be more loyal to a company that younger workers.

P.S. I am 30 years old
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Old 08-17-2008, 10:28 AM
 
Location: Ridgway/Saint Marys, PS
943 posts, read 2,317,220 times
Reputation: 385
Quote:
Originally Posted by artsyguy View Post
cold man cold
Hardly cold, but depending on what pitt_transplant does, a week is more then enough time to determine if someone is a good fit.
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Old 08-17-2008, 10:31 AM
 
Location: Ridgway/Saint Marys, PS
943 posts, read 2,317,220 times
Reputation: 385
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunsprit View Post
<snip>

As a shop owner, I can tell you that "good employees" are hard to find, even today. Throughout my entire blue-collar career, I was always able to find a decent paying job within days of wanting one. As a business owner, finding and retaining good help was always a challenge .... I could have left the business behind with multiple job offers in hand anytime; in some years, I would have made much more money with less hassles by going to work for someone else.

Probationary periods work both ways ....
Good employees are hard to find no matter what line of work you do.

In my industry, Im finding people with NO prior expierience whatsoever in radio being hired for airshift, when my 4 or so years gets completely overlooked.

Why? The boss wants someone they can pay minimum wage and who has no knowledge of the business so the new hire will do whatever the boss says.
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