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Old 04-05-2009, 10:53 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
826 posts, read 825,520 times
Reputation: 668
Quote:
Originally Posted by TVandSportsGuy View Post
What do you mean put in the cover letter you were laid off? I never heard of that.

And what is the limit of questions one should ask at a interview? 4? 5?

I revised my comment and put in resume. Sorry you read it as I was proof reading it. My bad!


10 questions are good.
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Old 04-05-2009, 10:54 PM
FBJ
 
32,732 posts, read 21,103,629 times
Reputation: 7048
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunnnee View Post
I revised my comment and put in resume. Sorry you read it as I was proof reading it. My bad!


10 questions are good.

Now see I was told that 10 was too many. I asked 11 at a interview in february and then some girl told me to not ask more than 4 or 5.
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Old 04-05-2009, 11:01 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
826 posts, read 825,520 times
Reputation: 668
Quote:
Originally Posted by TVandSportsGuy View Post
Now see I was told that 10 was too many. I asked 11 at a interview in february and then some girl told me to not ask more than 4 or 5.
That was her opinion. Did she hire you? Use your own judgement during the interview process. Ask yourself: Do you really want that job? They have to hire you, you don't have to take the job. During the interview, you should be able to gauge if that is the job you really want. I think 2yrs ago, people were still picky where they wanted to work, but nowadays its dog eat dog.

Just see how it goes and if they are really interested in what you have to say, then by a few questions if you haven't gotten the answers you wanted, then end at whatever number of questions that you want to ask.
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Old 04-05-2009, 11:03 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
826 posts, read 825,520 times
Reputation: 668
Here are questions you will be asked and how to answer them:

QUESTIONS YOU BE ASKED

Tell me about yourself: Again, as stated above, there is no set way of tackling this question. The best thing to do here is to give a brief introduction about yourself and then move on to provide the basic details about your previous positions and any significant achievements - don't go into too much detail - just a brief overview.

What are your strengths? This is one of the most common questions you will be asked and no doubt, have already been asked in previous interviews. You have to remember here - try to give an answer relevant to the position you are applying to. The interviewer is trying to find if your strengths match the job. For example, if you are applying for a job where accuracy is an important issue, one of your strengths could be that you have an "eye for detail".

What are your weaknesses? Again, another common question and 99% of the time you will have been asked this before. A common mistake to make when answering this question is saying something negative like "I am shy". Use this question to your advantage by actually turning a negative into a positive. For example, "I need to improve my typing skills and to combat this I have recently enrolled on a typing course". This will show you can identify your weaknesses but at the same time, you are willing to improve. Finally, and most importantly: do not mention a weakness that is any way related to the job you are being interviewed for! This might sound obvious but it is a common mistake!

** Others are "classic" interview questions, such as, "What is your greatest weakness?” Questions which most people answer inappropriately. In this case, the standard textbook answer for the "greatest weakness" question is to give a veiled positive--"I work too much. I just work and work and work"--which ends up sending the wrong message. Either you are lying or, worse yet, you are telling the truth, in which case you define working too much as a weakness and really don't want to work much at all. Think about it. ***

What do you enjoy doing outside of work? All too often, this question is answered the same "I enjoy music, socializing and reading". If possible avoid using this type of answer. Instead, try to aim your interests someway to the job you are applying for. If you have done some voluntary work this may be good to mention.

Why did you leave you last job? When answering this question make sure you do not give a negative answer. For example, "I did not get on with my boss" or "I did not agree with the way the business was managed" - this will make you sound negative and will greatly reduce any chance you have of being offered the position. If possible, try to answer the question so it shows you are looking for career progression. Also, if you were made redundant - say so. There is no reason to hide this fact!

Where do you see yourself in 5 years? A good answer here would be something along the lines of wanting to study and participate in training that will assist you in your job and aid in your chances of progressing within the company.

Why do you want to work here? This is an opportunity for you to show the interviewer how enthusiastic you are about the job/industry. Try to think of an answer that shows your interest in the job.

Have you got any questions for me? No doubt you will be asked this towards the end of the interview. Make sure you do as a question as this shows your seriousness and interest in the position. Maybe you could ask about how you will be trained for the position. Do not ask about salary or holidays though!!!

5. Why did you leave you last job? When answering this question make sure you do not give a negative answer. For example, "I did not get on with my boss" or "I did not agree with the way the business was managed" - this will make you sound negative and will greatly reduce any chance you have of being offered the position. If possible, try to answer the question so it shows you are looking for career progression. Also, if you were made redundant - say so. There is no reason to hide this fact!
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Old 04-05-2009, 11:28 PM
FBJ
 
32,732 posts, read 21,103,629 times
Reputation: 7048
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunnnee View Post
Here are questions you will be asked and how to answer them:

QUESTIONS YOU BE ASKED

Tell me about yourself: Again, as stated above, there is no set way of tackling this question. The best thing to do here is to give a brief introduction about yourself and then move on to provide the basic details about your previous positions and any significant achievements - don't go into too much detail - just a brief overview.

What are your strengths? This is one of the most common questions you will be asked and no doubt, have already been asked in previous interviews. You have to remember here - try to give an answer relevant to the position you are applying to. The interviewer is trying to find if your strengths match the job. For example, if you are applying for a job where accuracy is an important issue, one of your strengths could be that you have an "eye for detail".

What are your weaknesses? Again, another common question and 99% of the time you will have been asked this before. A common mistake to make when answering this question is saying something negative like "I am shy". Use this question to your advantage by actually turning a negative into a positive. For example, "I need to improve my typing skills and to combat this I have recently enrolled on a typing course". This will show you can identify your weaknesses but at the same time, you are willing to improve. Finally, and most importantly: do not mention a weakness that is any way related to the job you are being interviewed for! This might sound obvious but it is a common mistake!

** Others are "classic" interview questions, such as, "What is your greatest weakness? Questions which most people answer inappropriately. In this case, the standard textbook answer for the "greatest weakness" question is to give a veiled positive--"I work too much. I just work and work and work"--which ends up sending the wrong message. Either you are lying or, worse yet, you are telling the truth, in which case you define working too much as a weakness and really don't want to work much at all. Think about it. ***

What do you enjoy doing outside of work? All too often, this question is answered the same "I enjoy music, socializing and reading". If possible avoid using this type of answer. Instead, try to aim your interests someway to the job you are applying for. If you have done some voluntary work this may be good to mention.

Why did you leave you last job? When answering this question make sure you do not give a negative answer. For example, "I did not get on with my boss" or "I did not agree with the way the business was managed" - this will make you sound negative and will greatly reduce any chance you have of being offered the position. If possible, try to answer the question so it shows you are looking for career progression. Also, if you were made redundant - say so. There is no reason to hide this fact!

Where do you see yourself in 5 years? A good answer here would be something along the lines of wanting to study and participate in training that will assist you in your job and aid in your chances of progressing within the company.

Why do you want to work here? This is an opportunity for you to show the interviewer how enthusiastic you are about the job/industry. Try to think of an answer that shows your interest in the job.

Have you got any questions for me? No doubt you will be asked this towards the end of the interview. Make sure you do as a question as this shows your seriousness and interest in the position. Maybe you could ask about how you will be trained for the position. Do not ask about salary or holidays though!!!

5. Why did you leave you last job? When answering this question make sure you do not give a negative answer. For example, "I did not get on with my boss" or "I did not agree with the way the business was managed" - this will make you sound negative and will greatly reduce any chance you have of being offered the position. If possible, try to answer the question so it shows you are looking for career progression. Also, if you were made redundant - say so. There is no reason to hide this fact!

I see a made a mistake in answering the weakness question. The position was for Employment Coach and I said my weakness was-

"Focusing too much on the company goals and not develpping a rapport with the client. So I learned to focus on the numbers and build a relationship at the same time,"
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Old 04-06-2009, 01:43 AM
 
Location: George Town Tasmania, Australia
110 posts, read 99,341 times
Reputation: 82
Default Have A Read Of My Post On "42 Years and 4000 Job Applications"

Have A Read Of My Post On the subject: "2 Job Applications Per Week For 42 Years: 1961-2003." It might make you feel more optimistic.-Ron Price, Tasmania

Last edited by RonPrice; 04-06-2009 at 01:44 AM.. Reason: to add words
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Old 04-06-2009, 05:20 AM
 
22,201 posts, read 29,009,965 times
Reputation: 9937
Quote:
Originally Posted by TVandSportsGuy View Post
No it has gotten me a opportunity to GET a job.
Nearsies only count in horse shoes...
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Old 04-06-2009, 08:11 AM
 
1,111 posts, read 2,828,731 times
Reputation: 771
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunnnee View Post
That was her opinion. Did she hire you? Use your own judgement during the interview process. Ask yourself: Do you really want that job? They have to hire you, you don't have to take the job. During the interview, you should be able to gauge if that is the job you really want. I think 2yrs ago, people were still picky where they wanted to work, but nowadays its dog eat dog.

Just see how it goes and if they are really interested in what you have to say, then by a few questions if you haven't gotten the answers you wanted, then end at whatever number of questions that you want to ask.
I think this is good advice. When I am at a interview, I already have questions that I want to ask the interviewer in my mind, but always come up with more questions during the interview itself. Usually, I have questions when they give me a description of the job, responsibilities, management, business structure, etc. Before, I only made a move if I felt like the position would help my career, so always ask the questions I need to determine that. I never go into a interview thinking I will only ask 4 or 5 questions - I always ask as many as I have and need to ask to gauge the opportunity better.

My job requires me to ask a lot of questions and gather information so it tends to come naturally to me. I have been on a few interviews where the interviewer couldn't answer my question and said they would follow-up and let me know, and they've always follow through.

This is just one of those things where there is no right or wrong answer. But personally, I would try not to leave a interview if I have any questions regarding the role.
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Old 04-06-2009, 09:38 AM
 
536 posts, read 1,093,680 times
Reputation: 313
I would ask as many as needed but use good judgement. Don't ask questions that could be answered by HR, or some quick searchign online about the company.

There are certain questions you would be better off asking HR such as benefits. I can't believe how many supervisors I have inteviewed with that don't know the basics about vacation, benefits etc. Ask the interviewer questions directly related to your daily tasks and save the rest for someone else. If you don't meet with HR that day and don't have the contact (it has happened to me), make sure you ask for that information. Some companies use HR for filing the paperwork instead of letting them be a part of the process, and there is a chance you might not see them until your first day. That is never a good thing.

Just remember that you will be at this job more than you see your family and a good portion of your life will be taken up by it. It is important to know what you are getting into.

Asking questions is a good way to test the waters. If the interviewer struggles to answer, and HR isn't sure, then there is a chance the position isn't defined, the company is doing poorly etc. I am always suspicious if I don't get a straight answer.

I have a list of questions that I absolutely must have answered before I accept a position. I hate getting blindsided
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Old 04-06-2009, 09:55 AM
 
22,201 posts, read 29,009,965 times
Reputation: 9937
I think it's always a good idea to have a question about the company itself that you come up with after reviewing the companies web site. It shows taht you actually ahve taken teh time to learn about the company, and ahve interest in them.
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