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Unread 04-08-2009, 07:30 PM
 
Location: Baltimore
1,749 posts, read 3,900,930 times
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So runswithscissors, then how would you propose finding the best candidate for the job? What questions would you ask, or what scenarios would you use to assess people, as you say? If you believe interview questions are designed to create reasons to reject people, and not designed to identify the best candidate, then how would you go about selecting the right person?
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Unread 04-08-2009, 08:25 PM
 
4,390 posts, read 4,371,247 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by janetvj View Post
So runswithscissors, then how would you propose finding the best candidate for the job? What questions would you ask, or what scenarios would you use to assess people, as you say? If you believe interview questions are designed to create reasons to reject people, and not designed to identify the best candidate, then how would you go about selecting the right person?
I totally believe in interviewing. I interview people all the time. Customers for sales and service. Clients and witnesses for depositions. I am all about getting people talking.

BUT THESE OPEN ENDED simplistic questions are what I feel are lazy and not a bit informative. Not all questions.

I think you can get alot more out of people like this:

off the top of my head:

for decision making jobs:

* did you ever have a major challenges involving team building, conflict resolution, innovation, creativity? (whatever)

* I'd like to hear about a time that turned out negatively and one that turned out positively if you did...

* Why do you feel the outcomes were that way

*what would you do differently

Then I'd discuss it with the person to get a view of their thought process, situation assessment and insight and personality... you can always work the question in there about "big success" or not....

for entry level jobs
even say, a mom with experience with teachers and schools can come up with a similar situation usually...

or for say, a cashier position:

* did you ever see someone steal something and what happened?

* what did you do when there were no customers in line?

* did you ever come up short in your drawer and what happened?

* how did you handle a time that you were scheduled for hours that you didn't want to work?

*what would you do if you saw the customer was waiting at the next register but you were counting your drawer?


you can get alot of information from people if you get them talking, versus just hearing them tell you a story and take it verbatim...at least in my opinon.

For professionals
I'd use a real life experience that involved fact, conflict and ethics for example, and ask what they would do and not do and why:

I had a brand new licensed lawyer fail to protect the Defendant's discovery documents and the Plaintiff got them and was using them to destroy the guy's business. A BIG MISTAKE by that beginning lawyer, qualified for malpractice and a bunch of other things. The defendant had a definite case he could make to sue his lawyer.

I would ask a lawyer about that type of situation if I were hiring a lawyer. It covers everything. You could uncover what they would do with the discovery without telling them the outcome initially. Then, after telling them the outcome, you get Ethics, billable hours, admitting errors, correcting errors you could go for 45 minutes on a question like that. LOL

Anyway, I just think lazy questions don't help the company at all. My company fires 80% of all new hires and that's the type of dumb stuff they ask. And they just keep repeating the same thing over and over wasting training time and firing and rehiring tons of people LOL.
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Unread 04-08-2009, 09:00 PM
FBJ
 
31,345 posts, read 18,994,224 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by runswithscissors View Post
I totally believe in interviewing. I interview people all the time. Customers for sales and service. Clients and witnesses for depositions. I am all about getting people talking.

BUT THESE OPEN ENDED simplistic questions are what I feel are lazy and not a bit informative. Not all questions.

I think you can get alot more out of people like this:

off the top of my head:

for decision making jobs:

* did you ever have a major challenges involving team building, conflict resolution, innovation, creativity? (whatever)

* I'd like to hear about a time that turned out negatively and one that turned out positively if you did...

* Why do you feel the outcomes were that way

*what would you do differently

Then I'd discuss it with the person to get a view of their thought process, situation assessment and insight and personality... you can always work the question in there about "big success" or not....

for entry level jobs even say, a mom with experience with teachers and schools can come up with a similar situation usually...

or for say, a cashier position:

* did you ever see someone steal something and what happened?

* what did you do when there were no customers in line?

* did you ever come up short in your drawer and what happened?

* how did you handle a time that you were scheduled for hours that you didn't want to work?

*what would you do if you saw the customer was waiting at the next register but you were counting your drawer?


you can get alot of information from people if you get them talking, versus just hearing them tell you a story and take it verbatim...at least in my opinon.

For professionals I'd use a real life experience that involved fact, conflict and ethics for example, and ask what they would do and not do and why:

I had a brand new licensed lawyer fail to protect the Defendant's discovery documents and the Plaintiff got them and was using them to destroy the guy's business. A BIG MISTAKE by that beginning lawyer, qualified for malpractice and a bunch of other things. The defendant had a definite case he could make to sue his lawyer.

I would ask a lawyer about that type of situation if I were hiring a lawyer. It covers everything. You could uncover what they would do with the discovery without telling them the outcome initially. Then, after telling them the outcome, you get Ethics, billable hours, admitting errors, correcting errors you could go for 45 minutes on a question like that. LOL

Anyway, I just think lazy questions don't help the company at all. My company fires 80% of all new hires and that's the type of dumb stuff they ask. And they just keep repeating the same thing over and over wasting training time and firing and rehiring tons of people LOL.

I hate lazy questions, open ended are the best when it comes to job interviewing and dating-lol Like you said you find out so much more when you get someone talking.
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Unread 04-08-2009, 09:04 PM
 
25,171 posts, read 31,032,687 times
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I hate it when they answer the questions for you. That is so irritating and counter-productive isn't it.
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Unread 04-09-2009, 05:20 AM
 
Location: Baltimore
1,749 posts, read 3,900,930 times
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runswithscissors - I think those are excellent questions. The problem in my situation is that I work for state government. There are so many rules when it comes to conducting interviews that it really hinders the selection process. Because the state bends over backwards to avoid any hint of preferential treatment or bias, all interviewees for a particular classification have to be asked the exact same questions in the same order, and all questions first have to be approved by the personnel director and the EEOC officer. Each question is assigned a certain number of points possible, and the applicant is rated on how he or she answers the question. It is so structured that it really limits how much you can learn about the prospective employee.

Afterwards, I encourage the applicant to ask questions, as that is often the way I can get a better handle on whether he or she is a good fit for the job. Sometimes it really feels like a crap shoot. I have been very lucky and have gotten some excellent people on board, but I've also been burned a few times.
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Unread 04-09-2009, 07:55 AM
 
Location: Fort Worth/Dallas
11,886 posts, read 23,565,087 times
Reputation: 5331
Quote:
Originally Posted by GypsySoul22 View Post
Most interview questions are stupid. Let's face it, the whole process is asinine. You get someone in who can do a good b.s. session and they get the job over someone else.

Or maybe the interviewer just likes your suit and the way you present yourself.

"What can you bring to this company?"
"Myself for 40 hours a week."

Basically if everyone who was a screw up was unemployed, there would be a lot more jobs for the rest of us who know how to work.

There is something inherently wrong with the whole 'corporate system.'
I'm with you Gypsy!
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Unread 04-09-2009, 08:45 AM
 
4,390 posts, read 4,371,247 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by janetvj View Post
runswithscissors - I think those are excellent questions. The problem in my situation is that I work for state government. There are so many rules when it comes to conducting interviews that it really hinders the selection process. Because the state bends over backwards to avoid any hint of preferential treatment or bias, all interviewees for a particular classification have to be asked the exact same questions in the same order, and all questions first have to be approved by the personnel director and the EEOC officer. Each question is assigned a certain number of points possible, and the applicant is rated on how he or she answers the question. It is so structured that it really limits how much you can learn about the prospective employee.
Lemme say, your system is better for a "large" organization IMO. I come from a large organization so I'm good with that. For a small company, no, (I used to own a pet shop) it comes down to instinct. But for a large company it HAS to be that way. I'll tell you why. I left the phone company Dec 2007 after 30 years (young age).

They are hiring here. One reason I moved here, my coworkers all got jobs in NC so why not me here, should be a piece of cake. NOPE. For a year, confusion with the recruiters, ok, I get that, it's Florida. THEN I find out the office fires 80% of the hires so there's always churn and madness. OK, fine.I call the HR dept, (not the recruiters) she's all apologetic and pushes me to testing.I take the online tests just like the ones you're referring to. Definite answers no essay LOL.I pass.


I go to step two. An INTERVIEW, here's the story:

With WHO? The WORK CENTER. OMG I never heard of that in 30 years. HR ALWAYS ALWAYS fills jobs. NOT the dopey work centers that need people and in this case cant even keep people.

So I go. NIGHTMARE I CANT TELL YOU.

Every single employee in the work center was under 30 that I saw. Everyone was AA or Hispanic. Now, I come from Phila a majority minority city born and raised so this is normal for me but 100 PERCENT? In Fort Lauderdale??

Now I worked there 30 years (but not here) and never saw that in my life. We always had very diverse offices. And you'd NEVER want all under 30's you need experienced staff too. old geizers! LOL

I walk in and wait in a cubicle on the floor. MUSIC WAS BLARING OUT OF WALL MOUNTED WALL SPEAKERS, THE RADIO TALKING ABOUT RHIANNA AND CRIS. HAHAHAH THE INTERVIEW WAS RIGHT ON THE WORK CENTER FLOOR.

OK, the interviewer was about 24, walks in never introduces herself and asks for my social and stuff.

She starts asking questions off a script but stops frequently. She was sending emails and taking calls from her husband. Started CRYING on the phone with him. IN THE MIDDLE OF MY INTERVIEW. Also checking her call volumes and stuff online with me right there talking !!!!

Wasn't interested in my answers to questions she was reading to me. Wasn't writing down half of what I said. DIDN'T UNDERSTAND HALF OF WHAT I SAID AND I HAD TO REPEAT MYSELF AND USE EASIER WORDS LOL

She also had a REALLY REALLY thick accent (but so does my husband, ok) and was speed reading her script with her head down so you had no clue especially while she let the end of each sentance drift off into nowhere during the talking on the blaring radio about Rhianna. LOL

The questions were stupid. "Tell me about a time a customer was mad" But I knew what they were gonna be so I answered. I think she was confused since I worked there before.

OK...........so I know I'm screwed.

The next day an email, you didn't PASS the interview hahahahahahaha what a shock..

So I call the HR rep who is SHOCKED AND DUMBFOUNDED about how this interview was handled....and asks me to write it in an email and send to her. So I did. I dont expect anything to come of it and have to wait 6 months to apply for a job I did with the same company for 30 years all over again. LOLOL

It wont matter a bit. That particular office gets away with hiring everyone that looks just like everyone else. Nobody over 30 etc. Then they have to fire 80% of them because the standards dont exist. A revolving door. THAT'S WHAT YOU GET when NO objective CONTROLS AT ALL are placed on interviewers and hiring and HR is powerless.

I asked the HR person why in the world there are no people over 30 and no Caucasians in that office and she said "oh you don't even wanna go there, that's the new way".

Next time I"m trying for Pensacola office. I'm a masochist
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Unread 04-09-2009, 09:56 AM
 
536 posts, read 1,038,582 times
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Depends on the industry and your xp. I might say something as simple as my ability to learn new things quicky and start pulling my own weight immediately. If you are unlucky (I have been!) and get a real die hard hiring manager that keeps hounding you until you give him a better answer you might be in trouble.

You probably accomplished lots of things but probably did not look at them as accomplishments at the time. Even at entry level meaningless jobs you can find something. Helped a lot of customers, ability to do your job and help in other areas without being asked, and maybe you helped increase sales, or decrease complaints. Anything goes.

Maybe they are looking for your ability to look beyond what you think is meaningless, and find value in what you are doing, regardles of how simple the job is.

Honestly I hate that question too! I like interviews that are laid back BS sessions where I get taken to lunch.
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Unread 04-09-2009, 11:52 AM
 
5,527 posts, read 5,492,102 times
Reputation: 1816
Quote:
Originally Posted by GypsySoul22 View Post
Most interview questions are stupid. Let's face it, the whole process is asinine. You get someone in who can do a good b.s. session and they get the job over someone else.

Or maybe the interviewer just likes your suit and the way you present yourself.

"What can you bring to this company?"
"Myself for 40 hours a week."

Basically if everyone who was a screw up was unemployed, there would be a lot more jobs for the rest of us who know how to work.

There is something inherently wrong with the whole 'corporate system.'
So how pray tell you should companies go about weeding out the good apples from the bad without interviewing them?

Also, you have a pretty sour attitude.....maybe you should change your bi-line since you don't seem to be taking your own medicine.
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Unread 04-09-2009, 04:55 PM
 
6,764 posts, read 12,580,850 times
Reputation: 4427
Quote:
Originally Posted by tluv00 View Post
So how pray tell you should companies go about weeding out the good apples from the bad without interviewing them?

Also, you have a pretty sour attitude.....maybe you should change your bi-line since you don't seem to be taking your own medicine.
You have a great day now!!
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