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Old 06-15-2009, 03:49 AM
 
943 posts, read 2,781,051 times
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Even in today's terrible economy I have noticed (as a Human Resources Recruiter) a larger number of applicants interviewing the manager and their potential closest coworkers to see if the job is a good match. This is more likely to be done in later interviews after the person feels like they are a strong finalist for the job.

But most candidates go ahead and accept the job without finding out about:

Where they will be sitting (sharing an office, cubicle, in a large room or private office- the question is never brought up)

Who they will be working the closely with

Meeting their direct reports if they have a staff

Really talking to their manager to understand their supervisory techniques, personality and history with the previous people in the role.
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The result is the applicant accepts the job without really knowing what they are getting into and failing.
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Old 06-15-2009, 05:49 AM
 
26,590 posts, read 54,595,142 times
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Maybe in the company you work for (which obviously has some issues in the HR/Recruiting department) but that's not been the case in every job I've had in teh past 20 years. Even some of the jobs I've interviewed for but not gotten, I've been given a tour of the office and met the people I'd be working with (often over lunch) so there would have been no surprises. Seems that YOUR employer has some issues.
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Old 06-15-2009, 06:21 AM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
1,283 posts, read 2,657,593 times
Reputation: 1166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Weekend Traveler View Post
Even in today's terrible economy I have noticed (as a Human Resources Recruiter) a larger number of applicants interviewing the manager and their potential closest coworkers to see if the job is a good match. This is more likely to be done in later interviews after the person feels like they are a strong finalist for the job.

But most candidates go ahead and accept the job without finding out about:

Where they will be sitting (sharing an office, cubicle, in a large room or private office- the question is never brought up)

Who they will be working the closely with

Meeting their direct reports if they have a staff

Really talking to their manager to understand their supervisory techniques, personality and history with the previous people in the role.
-----
The result is the applicant accepts the job without really knowing what they are getting into and failing.
Personally, I think it is important for interviewees to meet as many folks as possible which they may have to deal with, on any given work day. Also, it's important to ask the interviewer questions, and one you hit on is extremely important, and one I started asking only in recent years: What happened to the last guy (mine is a male-dominated field)? If an interviewer gets defensive or doesn't want to talk about it, seems nervous, etc., run. Don't walk, run. That's a huge red flag, and it's easy to trip up interviewers with simple questions like that one.

Had I done this or simply asked around a few places I've accepted jobs at in the past, I would have learned these places were swinging doors for people in those roles, and I would have never taken the job.
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Old 06-15-2009, 09:46 AM
 
Location: Baton Rouge, LA
1,357 posts, read 4,907,121 times
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It's amazing what you can pick up about a company by (1) asking the hiring manager (hopefully your boss) questions and (2) meeting your potential coworkers over lunch. It takes a little more effort, but it's well worth it !
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Old 06-15-2009, 10:10 AM
 
Location: Up in the air
19,121 posts, read 26,684,026 times
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I had a 'working' interview at my current job. I worked a full 8 hour day and basically mirrored the gentleman whose position I was taking over. I met all the employees, saw where I was working, got a good feel for what I was doing and was able to ask employees one on one what they thought of working here.

I know not all employees would be willing to do this, but for me it showed that the company really cared who they brought into their family.
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Old 06-15-2009, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Seattle
1,743 posts, read 3,199,829 times
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I worked for a company about 15 years ago that did this. After the candidates were narrowed down to about 3, each the 5 staff in our section were then allowed to do a quick interview with the 3 individually. We got to know them and they got to know us. It was very refreshing to have been able to do that.

It went further than that at the company as there were always avenues to be involved. It really helped moral and lessened the complaints as you became part of the decision.
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Old 06-15-2009, 01:51 PM
 
Location: southern california
55,665 posts, read 74,620,384 times
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no i was thrown to the wolves every time. but i am pleased to say there were always a kind lone wolf that stood out from the pack and did not let me be devoured. btw they were never ever the appointed ojt, ever.
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Old 06-16-2009, 06:28 AM
 
371 posts, read 1,117,900 times
Reputation: 214
Even if I did meet the folks I'd work with, of course they seem polite, nice and tell you it's a good place to work ( what else would they say to a potential hire they don't even know?). It takes a few weeks to really peg down the varying personalities in a place. I will say that the same types of personalities are at every place...the quiter ones, the ones that are 'good teachers', the ones who may have experience but are not good at teaching, the ones that seem to stir up things, the drama queens, the constant complainers, etc. Hopefully, you find someone to connect well with and fall into the work family seemlessly.
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Old 06-16-2009, 09:29 AM
 
536 posts, read 1,685,849 times
Reputation: 328
In the past I have interviewed with potential coworkers. For the most part they are extremely nice and have nothing but good things to say. And then it all changes after I am hired and work with them for a few weeks (sometimes not even a day) and find out about their real personality.

I love it when I get a one-on-one interview with a coworker. That is where you really get a feel for the environment. And it has saved me lots of bad choices.

You would think hiring managers would do this more often instead of just throwing someone into the fire. Of course maybe they think there is nothing wrong with the people under them.
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Old 06-16-2009, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Up in the air
19,121 posts, read 26,684,026 times
Reputation: 16255
Quote:
Originally Posted by sike0000 View Post
In the past I have interviewed with potential coworkers. For the most part they are extremely nice and have nothing but good things to say. And then it all changes after I am hired and work with them for a few weeks (sometimes not even a day) and find out about their real personality.

I love it when I get a one-on-one interview with a coworker. That is where you really get a feel for the environment. And it has saved me lots of bad choices.

You would think hiring managers would do this more often instead of just throwing someone into the fire. Of course maybe they think there is nothing wrong with the people under them.

That's one thing I love about my company. During my 'working interview' a bunch of the company went out to lunch, including the managers and president of the company. We sat around and chatted and the employees were NOT bashful when it came to 'office politics'. They weren't afraid to tell their boss and the president exactly how they felt about how thing were run. One of the accounting personnel told our CFO that 'he needs to quit slacking on myspace and get some work done'.

I guess some companies are more open than others.
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