U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Closed Thread Start New Thread
 
Unread 08-27-2010, 06:37 PM
 
Location: Kentucky
2,853 posts, read 4,690,880 times
Reputation: 1092
Quote:
Originally Posted by Visvaldis View Post
Learn a little about the world.
We all need to buddy.

 
Unread 08-27-2010, 07:17 PM
 
242 posts, read 401,761 times
Reputation: 186
I'm not sure how the CIA factors its rates (isn't poverty line defined independently by each country's government?), but I trust the OECD calculations more:
Income distribution - Poverty

According to their data, the US is among the top 4 in poverty rates (after taxes and transfers). 21 European countries, plus the UK and Ireland, have lower rates than the US. Not surprisingly, Scandinavian countries have the lowest rates. The CIA's data doesn't list Sweden or Norway. Google results say Sweden has 7% "below the poverty line" (the point being compared in the CIA's list).

Another list, formulated by the UN, with similar results (northern Europe, followed by much of Europe with lowest, US with the highest):
Human Poverty Index - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Last edited by vaga bond; 08-27-2010 at 07:25 PM..
 
Unread 08-27-2010, 07:19 PM
 
Location: Beautiful Pennsylvania
605 posts, read 1,105,985 times
Reputation: 544
I don't think the U.S. is the best country to live in, but it is one of the best. It always depends on your personal preferences, which country is the best for you.
Freedom is one thing to talk about. In my opinion, every person should have the same freedom to develop and to chose a job, to chose his personal kind of lifestyle. In the US this is not (or better say not always) possible in case your parents are poor and cannot afford for university, for health insurance, etc. On the other hand, it is easyier to become very rich and to have a very luxury lifestyle. Is it really freedom, when all your life, your health and your childrens education are strongly dependend on your salary? I don't think so.
 
Unread 08-27-2010, 07:39 PM
 
242 posts, read 401,761 times
Reputation: 186
I think the US is quite nice if you're wealthy. If you're average, life can be quite rough unless you get lucky. If you're wealthy, you can buy a home far from the high crime areas, live near/on the beach in California. Perhaps the suburban city planning becomes boring and inconvenient. Even then, as discussed before, the crime and poverty is quite widespread. You can't live a normal life entirely in a rich people's fortress community. The average person is likely going to encounter noticeable poverty (and be at risk of becoming a crime statistic) on a much more frequent basis and is at higher risk of falling into it (if they lose their job, there is little safety net). A rich child can afford a top US university, an average child is going to have to be the top of their class and then some to get in and get enough financial aid. I had a few friends in such positions, but they were just middle class and ended up going to the in-state universities due to cost. Nearly everyone else is going to pile on a hefty debt by the time they finish at an average university or college (paying back $100-$1000+/month for much of their life).

The ability to move up in the US (social mobility) is largely a myth, percentage wise. Of course, with so many people, it comparatively seems like many do. The difference is your chance of becoming filthy rich is lower in many European countries due to progressive taxation, but that says nothing about social mobility. Chart: Evidence: Social Mobility | The Equality Trust (http://www.equalitytrust.org.uk/why/evidence/social-mobility - broken link)

Last edited by vaga bond; 08-27-2010 at 07:54 PM..
 
Unread 08-27-2010, 07:50 PM
 
Location: Texas State Fair
8,569 posts, read 4,167,241 times
Reputation: 4099
nep321, there is no real answer to your OP and although there are at least 30 outstanding relies, there is only one way to find the truth. Having asked the question, at age 26 with a master's degree, it's time for you to find that truth. And now is your prime opportunity.

With the U.S. economy going into slow mode you should chuck whatever it is you're doing with your life at the time. Unless you're married with child on the way. If you have possessions then store them with a nearest relative, put your cash where you can get to it easily and head off to London.

London will be easy as they speak 'yankeese' and it's a good place to get euro acclimated. Take a few weeks then head off to Paris, the med, Spain, then to eastern Europe. By now you'll have gotten an idea of how not only is there no reasonable comparison of the U.S. to another country but euro countries have no comparison to one another.

By time you need to replace the Levi's it'll be time to head for mom's laundry. Take some time to sort and collect your thoughts, make a plan and get a job. Hopefully by then a new Congress will have restored some sanity to the government and the U.S. can take the shades off.

Have a good trip... drop a post here at C-D from time to time.
 
Unread 08-27-2010, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Arizona
2,453 posts, read 208,163 times
Reputation: 1065
to the OP

something worth spending a little time on, but remember, it is all in the eye of the beholder

Interactive Infographic of the World's Best Countries - Newsweek
 
Unread 08-27-2010, 08:53 PM
 
Location: West Texas
423 posts, read 433,466 times
Reputation: 258
Quote:
Originally Posted by poxonyou View Post
A rich child can afford a top US university, an average child is going to have to be the top of their class and then some to get in and get enough financial aid. I had a few friends in such positions, but they were just middle class and ended up going to the in-state universities due to cost.
Does every child in Europe goes to a top university? Because last time I checked the top universities have much smaller enrollment than the public ones. Which is pretty consistent with America.

Quote:
The ability to move up in the US (social mobility) is largely a myth, percentage wise. Of course, with so many people, it comparatively seems like many do. The difference is your chance of becoming filthy rich is lower in many European countries due to progressive taxation, but that says nothing about social mobility.
This actually makes sense. Considering that European countries have much lower income inequality than United States it's much easier to move up in a smaller income range than go from $16K/year to $250K/year in an instant.
 
Unread 08-27-2010, 08:54 PM
 
1,080 posts, read 2,210,039 times
Reputation: 325
Germany has as much freedoms as the USA, except your not allowed to join cults or talk bad about the country like the westbaptist boro people do about the USA, or have nazi marching rallies, which im good with.

germany may be more expensive in some of its states, but overall it offers a better quality of life, way more laid back then the states, people dont live paycheck to paycheck like over here, i went out clubing in the downtown and was walking around at 4 in the morning, you cant do that in my home city miami, ive known people who were robed at gun point cause of it

and germany has a lower median income than the USA, plus most cities offer mroe to do, my parents home town of 130k offers more than my city of miami
 
Unread 08-27-2010, 09:23 PM
 
242 posts, read 401,761 times
Reputation: 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by Heimdall View Post
Does every child in Europe goes to a top university? Because last time I checked the top universities have much smaller enrollment than the public ones. Which is pretty consistent with America.
Right. My point was even though the US does have some of the best ranked universities, it's not as if most are going to those universities. Since university is free for many of those living in Europe, the main hurdle is one's previous school performance, rather than school performance and one's (parents') wealth. They also leave without carrying a large debt on their shoulders. A US student can reduce their cost if they are at the top of their class, qualify for enough scholarships or grants, and stay in-state.

Quote:
This actually makes sense. Considering that European countries have much lower income inequality than United States it's much easier to move up in a smaller income range than go from $16K/year to $250K/year in an instant.
I was thinking the same, but I'm not sure how they calculated this. If it's simply a result of income equality and a country's wealth, then you must decide if having the small chance of being filthy rich is worth living in a country with great economic differences and the associated problems. If you have certain skills that are fairly guaranteed to lead to a job with a high salary in the US, then you don't have to worry about the income equality and social mobility difference between the regions.
 
Unread 08-27-2010, 11:36 PM
 
Location: Paris, France
320 posts, read 439,408 times
Reputation: 365
The reply to the original question, the best country for most people is the one they are from -- it has defined their cultural values, expectations, social status and it is the one country that they fully understand.

However, each country has advantages and disadvantages which can sometimes outweigh all other factors. I don't think that such things can be studied from the outside, even though there is limitless material written about them. The only way to begin to get a feel of whether other countries might offer something "better" for one's own aspirations is to travel and see for yourself.

In my own case, I was born in the U.S. but my mother is French, so my brother and I were exposed to both cultures, and we made a number of trips to France in our youth. As an adult, I moved to France within one week of finishing college, while my brother chose to live his life in the U.S. Each person is different.
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread

Over $74,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:23 AM.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top