U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
 
Old 04-10-2011, 10:51 PM
 
Location: Viña del Mar, Chile
14,243 posts, read 11,154,493 times
Reputation: 12923
Default Teaching english in foreign countries

Just wondering if anyone has done this. I'm not putting any serious thought into it, more or less experiences. Is this something that is on a contract basis or a summer job type deal? How is the pay/standard of living with these jobs?
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-11-2011, 02:42 AM
 
Location: 22.1667° N, 113.5500° E
11,750 posts, read 17,413,295 times
Reputation: 5560
Quote:
Originally Posted by burgler09 View Post
Just wondering if anyone has done this. I'm not putting any serious thought into it, more or less experiences. Is this something that is on a contract basis or a summer job type deal? How is the pay/standard of living with these jobs?
I've been at it for 15 years...with a few breaks imbetween. Went back to the US once for a year and another time for 2 1/2 years.

Pay varies tremendously between each country. Generally speaking, Europe, Latin America, and Southeast Asia pay ridiculously low. Places like the Middle East, Japan, and Korea pay alright.

It can either be a career, or you can do it short-term, like anything I suppose.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2011, 05:13 AM
 
230 posts, read 394,690 times
Reputation: 187
I've been doing it for about 8 years now. Always in Rio de Janeiro except one year I spent in Mexico City. As far as Latin America paying low, that really depends. Many people come here FOB (Fresh off the boat) and don't take it very seriously because they aren't planning on sticking around long term and don't have a residency permit. Basically they are working illegally. I did it myself when I first arrived so I am not knocking anyone for doing this. Most of them accept jobs for the equivalent of 12 dollars an hour and don't work many hours either. (of course they don't realize the school is charging the student the equivalent of 40 dollars an hour) But, if you stay long term, learn the language, take it seriously, and work privately, you can make decent money. You have to treat it like a business. You are a professional service provider and and a freelancer. That means you must do your own marketing, budgeting, and provide you customers (students) with a level of service with which they are satisfied. If you do this you can make decent money. I am on the low end of this spectrum and I live OK (my own apartment, go out to eat and drink a couple times a week) but I know two other people who are more ambitious than me and both are able to support a wife and child through English teaching. Now I'm not saying they live like kings or anything but they both are able to provide for their family a decent middle class living.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2011, 05:28 AM
 
13,982 posts, read 11,388,350 times
Reputation: 5198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post

Pay varies tremendously between each country. Generally speaking, Europe, Latin America, and Southeast Asia pay ridiculously low. Places like the Middle East, Japan, and Korea pay alright.
I spend a year teaching at a private university in Ecuador where the pay was quite high as it was linked to the dollar before the dollarization of the Ecuadorian economy. But in order to get such a job one must have a M.A. in TESOL. Otherwise, the pay in South America is usually quite low.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2011, 07:31 AM
 
Location: 22.1667° N, 113.5500° E
11,750 posts, read 17,413,295 times
Reputation: 5560
Quote:
Originally Posted by nesne View Post
I've been doing it for about 8 years now. Always in Rio de Janeiro except one year I spent in Mexico City. As far as Latin America paying low, that really depends. Many people come here FOB (Fresh off the boat) and don't take it very seriously because they aren't planning on sticking around long term and don't have a residency permit. Basically they are working illegally. I did it myself when I first arrived so I am not knocking anyone for doing this. Most of them accept jobs for the equivalent of 12 dollars an hour and don't work many hours either. (of course they don't realize the school is charging the student the equivalent of 40 dollars an hour) But, if you stay long term, learn the language, take it seriously, and work privately, you can make decent money. You have to treat it like a business. You are a professional service provider and and a freelancer. That means you must do your own marketing, budgeting, and provide you customers (students) with a level of service with which they are satisfied. If you do this you can make decent money. I am on the low end of this spectrum and I live OK (my own apartment, go out to eat and drink a couple times a week) but I know two other people who are more ambitious than me and both are able to support a wife and child through English teaching. Now I'm not saying they live like kings or anything but they both are able to provide for their family a decent middle class living.
Cool, didn't realize you were in Brazil.

I was in Sao Paulo and Rio de Jainero for six months in 1997-1998, teaching English. Was making 15 reils per 90 minute lesson living in Sao Paulo. Had to go to different companies either before their work shift, their lunch break, or after their work shift. WIth the cost of subways eating meals from being out of the house all day running around, I wasn't saving much at all. Impossible to get a work visa as well.

Still, I loved Brazil though. Still dream of the place...saudade and all that.

I guess I would have definitely been one of the FOB at the time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chava61 View Post
I spend a year teaching at a private university in Ecuador where the pay was quite high as it was linked to the dollar before the dollarization of the Ecuadorian economy. But in order to get such a job one must have a M.A. in TESOL. Otherwise, the pay in South America is usually quite low.
True! I have M.A. in TESOL now. But, back when I was in South America, and I spent about a month in Ecuador, they pay was equivalent to $3 hour! On the other hand, things were pretty cheap there in 1998.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2011, 11:05 PM
 
Location: Viña del Mar, Chile
14,243 posts, read 11,154,493 times
Reputation: 12923
Yeah , I was actually looking at that TEFL site. If I did it, I'd 100% go to Rio. The teaching thing seems like it could be a lot of fun, plus I like languages a lot. I do speak Spanish and Portuguese, so I'd want to probably stay in South America. Thanks for the good advice though!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-12-2011, 02:01 AM
 
Location: 22.1667° N, 113.5500° E
11,750 posts, read 17,413,295 times
Reputation: 5560
Quote:
Originally Posted by burgler09 View Post
Yeah , I was actually looking at that TEFL site. If I did it, I'd 100% go to Rio. The teaching thing seems like it could be a lot of fun, plus I like languages a lot. I do speak Spanish and Portuguese, so I'd want to probably stay in South America. Thanks for the good advice though!
I've always taught adults, which is great. Instant social network, and wealth of information.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-12-2011, 07:00 AM
 
13,982 posts, read 11,388,350 times
Reputation: 5198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
True! I have M.A. in TESOL now. But, back when I was in South America, and I spent about a month in Ecuador, they pay was equivalent to $3 hour! On the other hand, things were pretty cheap there in 1998.
I was in Guayaquil in 1996/7 and the language schools paid the equivalent of $3 an hour approx but the university I worked for paid a good salary linked to the dollar. The same university later changed its system (after I left Ecuador) and the new teachers were paid a lower salary as the pay was no longer linked to dollar.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-12-2011, 11:07 PM
 
Location: 河南郑州, Kansas City, Iowa, Fargo
253 posts, read 1,046,961 times
Reputation: 166
I'm on my second year in China and I'm planning on a third. Pay is good for IN CHINA, but the exchange rate back to USD is awful. Then on to grad school!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-14-2011, 08:01 AM
 
Location: Texas
193 posts, read 293,944 times
Reputation: 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Surrender View Post
I'm on my second year in China and I'm planning on a third. Pay is good for IN CHINA, but the exchange rate back to USD is awful. Then on to grad school!
You think the exchange rate going from RMB to USD is awful? Are you serious?
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $79,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top