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Old 02-10-2012, 06:54 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,691 posts, read 19,705,146 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Interesting. Perhaps my view of this aspect of Australia is outdated. Do the main Australian networks show other British comedy and drama series in prime time then?

(I did know about Aussie soapies being popular in the UK...)
The US is definitely the dominant market, followed by Australian productions and then British films, although the ABC is mainly British. Few British shows on the main networks like channel 7, 9, 10 any time of day, but the ABC carries the big British comedies, dramas, talk shows.

Fondly remember the 'after school programme' on the ABC, which would run from 3 pm when we got home from school, to about 5 or 6. Playschool, adapted from the British version (but running strong here since 1966) was a fixture for many generations of kids. We had the best of both worlds: Sesame Street and the rest (Disney, Nick, CN - only on cable but they aired a lot of their shows on free to air) the British, Canadian and Aussie shows. It certainly was a great time to be a kid.
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Old 02-10-2012, 09:26 PM
 
Location: Toronto
3,339 posts, read 2,997,539 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Fondly remember the 'after school programme' on the ABC, which would run from 3 pm when we got home from school, to about 5 or 6. Playschool, adapted from the British version (but running strong here since 1966) was a fixture for many generations of kids. We had the best of both worlds: Sesame Street and the rest (Disney, Nick, CN - only on cable but they aired a lot of their shows on free to air) the British, Canadian and Aussie shows. It certainly was a great time to be a kid.
I don't know if it's just me, but it seems that programming for kids is a bit more cross-national (well, at least shared among the Anglophone nations). Maybe, since kids shows are not divided by and aware of any politics, cultural differences and cultural references the way things we watch as adults, like sitcoms or comedies are.
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Old 02-10-2012, 09:33 PM
 
Location: Toronto
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I do remember at least three of Aussie shows for young kids airing here from around the start of/early the 90s -- Bananas in Pajamas and Johnson and Friends (lol.. the accordion and hot water bottle with faces still comes to mind). Later on, there was this one called Magic Mountain I think.

Though I only knew often which shows are from which country by looking at lists online; my childhood memories don't retain accent differences
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Old 02-10-2012, 10:15 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,691 posts, read 19,705,146 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stumbler. View Post
I don't know if it's just me, but it seems that programming for kids is a bit more cross-national (well, at least shared among the Anglophone nations). Maybe, since kids shows are not divided by and aware of any politics, cultural differences and cultural references the way things we watch as adults, like sitcoms or comedies are.
I wish I could remember all the Canadian shows we used to get. I knew that because at the end credits there'd be a 'TV Ontario/Quebec' or CBC or some other Canadian television logo. To me their accent just sounded American. Indeed we got more Canadian-produced shows than American-produced ones. But our exposure to American TV was of course pretty complete; I think we got most of what most Americans grew up on it. When they talk about kids TV shows I can recognise/have seen most. I'm not sure if you can help me with this one (how old are you by the way, if you don't mind me asking?) but when I was a kid I just remember this clip of this show where there was this lady with a group of kids in the woods, in the Fall I think, and they were singing the Canadian national anthem and raising the flag. I think I discovered a show it might have been but I forgot now. I was probably 5 or 6, it might've been the first time I realized there was a country called Canada that was different to America. For some weird reason it stuck in my memory, maybe that's why, one's memory picks up random clips like that.

There did seem to be a cross-Commonwealth exchange of TV shows. It's cool you got Johnson and Friends, that was one of my favourites when I was young too.
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Old 02-10-2012, 10:40 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
10,453 posts, read 10,189,622 times
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I would put Mexico above UK,
I don't think UK has much in common with the US.

Why Mexico? One example, first cowboys in America were mexicans.
Vaqueros: The First Cowboys of the Open Range
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Old 02-10-2012, 10:59 PM
 
Location: Toronto
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
I'm not sure if you can help me with this one (how old are you by the way, if you don't mind me asking?) but when I was a kid I just remember this clip of this show where there was this lady with a group of kids in the woods, in the Fall I think, and they were singing the Canadian national anthem and raising the flag. I think I discovered a show it might have been but I forgot now. I was probably 5 or 6, it might've been the first time I realized there was a country called Canada that was different to America. For some weird reason it stuck in my memory, maybe that's why, one's memory picks up random clips like that.
I don't know if I recall in particular singing the national anthem, but since you mention a show about kids outdoors, the one that comes to mind is Camp Cariboo.


Camp Cariboo intro 1986 - YouTube

I remember this from maybe the early '90s.

I'm 24 this year. Is that old/young enough for you?
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Old 02-10-2012, 11:07 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,691 posts, read 19,705,146 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stumbler. View Post
I don't know if I recall in particular singing the national anthem, but since you mention a show about kids outdoors, the one that comes to mind is Camp Cariboo.


Camp Cariboo intro 1986 - YouTube

I remember this from maybe the early '90s.

I'm 24 this year. Is that old/young enough for you?
Gosh that was corny, haha. Nah doesn't ring a bell, it must be another show, thanks anyway for that er, painfully cheesy blast from the past!

I just turned 26, I thought you were around my age.
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Old 02-11-2012, 09:46 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
10,001 posts, read 8,492,295 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dopo View Post
I would put Mexico above UK,
I don't think UK has much in common with the US.

Why Mexico? One example, first cowboys in America were mexicans.
Vaqueros: The First Cowboys of the Open Range
Outside the Mexican or Hispanic population, Mexican culture has fairly little influence on U.S. society. (This might be somewhat different in the states bordering Mexico).

The same with all Latin American countries. The vast majority of Americans have no idea about Spanish-language poets or authors or actors or composers, etc. Nor can most Americans speak Spanish even passably.
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Old 02-11-2012, 09:54 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,691 posts, read 19,705,146 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
Outside the Mexican or Hispanic population, Mexican culture has fairly little influence on U.S. society. (This might be somewhat different in the states bordering Mexico).

The same with all Latin American countries. The vast majority of Americans have no idea about Spanish-language poets or authors or actors or composers, etc. Nor can most Americans speak Spanish even passably.
Except for food, of course. A lot of Spanish words and phrases have become part of the English lexicon via Mexico. E.g. 'adios amigos!' (Westerns probably helped there too).

When you consider the nation's second largest city and still media capital is half Hispanic, the influence will only grow as time goes by...
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Old 02-11-2012, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Miami / Florida / U.S.A.
684 posts, read 789,142 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
My rank:

1. Canada
2. Australia
3. United Kingdom
4. New Zealand
5. Ireland
6. Mexico
7. Germany
8. The Philippines
9. The Netherlands
10. Singapore
Mexico of course

There are more than 60 million U.S. Nationals of Mexican ancestry.
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