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Old 03-09-2012, 06:03 AM
 
16,362 posts, read 13,519,972 times
Reputation: 6501

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobman View Post
Even as a native English (Scottish) speaker, I find some of the Highlanders hard to understand.
Aberdeen accents can be undecipherable, as can some of the islanders

At the moment I'm learning Norwegian, but finding the Stavanger dialect hard.
It's only subtle differences, but it can catch you out.
Some Scottish accents are very difficult to understand for other native speakers of English.

Chinese & Arabic both have several different dialects. If you understand one dialect you may not understand another.
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Old 03-09-2012, 06:18 AM
 
Location: England
135 posts, read 82,916 times
Reputation: 205
Hello.

Done some work as a translator with the Army in the past and had an occasion where i had an:

Englishman (me)
Dane
Spaniard
American
Iraqi
Frenchman

In the same room all talking in French (as it was the only language that the Iraqi spoke that we could all understand) and after 20 secs the Frenchman being in hysterics and unable to talk to us for about 15mins. Whilst we all thought we spoke fairly accentless French he told us that we all put our own 'twists' on the words to make them fit how we would normally speak and the affect when we all did it together was hilarious.
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Old 03-09-2012, 06:32 AM
 
Location: Malaysia
319 posts, read 262,627 times
Reputation: 154
The most diverse dialects that can be found should be the Chinese in China. Without speaking the Mandarin which is the official language , it is impossible to understand each other from different province or city which may be just 50 miles apart. Even at the same province - there may be 5 major dialects where people speak in tongues. Chinese language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 03-09-2012, 09:20 AM
 
189 posts, read 298,975 times
Reputation: 179
English spoken by some African Americans
I moved here in Chicago just last year. I talked to some black people, and I could not understand a word they're saying.
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Old 03-09-2012, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Malaysia
319 posts, read 262,627 times
Reputation: 154
Instead of how u doing? , it's how's the hanging?
That's why Beyonce sang - to the left, to the left
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Old 03-09-2012, 09:42 AM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
14,847 posts, read 8,647,097 times
Reputation: 5713
Some Scottish accents are so thick, especially the ones in the north-west.
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Old 03-09-2012, 09:42 AM
 
16,257 posts, read 9,379,522 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tvdxer View Post
Caribbean dialects of Spanish used to be some of the hardest for me, but spending time in Tabasco, Mexico (right on the Gulf Coast) changed that.

Despite spending 18 days in Spain, I still struggle to understand Castillian TV. Argentine and Chilean dialects are also very difficult to understand.

Also, almost everywhere, the poor and uneducated are much harder to understand than the wealthy and highly-educated, who tend to speak in a dialect more similar to the "standard" or "uniforme" one on TV. They also tend to have all their teeth. I think this is true of any language. My Mexican friend understands many of the words that I speak in a comfortable Minnesota dialect of English, but comprehends almost nothing spoken in "Ebonics".
Definitely, same here. Watching TV from Lisbon, no problem, but talking to some older farmer from the hinterland lacking most of his teeth can be quite a challenge.
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Old 03-09-2012, 09:43 AM
 
Location: PA
18,844 posts, read 9,118,079 times
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I can't understand a few UK accents (I speak English fluently, or C2 level if ur European), and I'm a native Spanish speaker and I still can't sometimes understand Spaniards north of Andalusia, Argentinians, Uruguayans, and Chileans
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Old 03-09-2012, 09:45 AM
 
189 posts, read 298,975 times
Reputation: 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by zinglicious View Post
Instead of how u doing? , it's how's the hanging?
That's why Beyonce sang - to the left, to the left
It's not really the vocabulary. But it's their accent. Something about their voice, how they speak.
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Old 03-09-2012, 10:24 AM
 
Location: Malaysia
319 posts, read 262,627 times
Reputation: 154
From what I was taught by my colleagues back in Newark, NJ to North Philly, PA, the way of figure in speech is different by what being said between the ones from the hood to those from the Wall Street. "Wassup, dawg" U dig?" to "How R U doing, my friend, do you understand?"

In fact, quite easy ti identify those from UK to USA , by how you are being greeted - It is between "How are you?" and "How R U doing?"
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