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Old 03-11-2012, 03:56 PM
 
Location: 30-40°N 90-100°W
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As mentioned I think some of the federal republics, like Germany, might be high here.

If you want a federal republic with a longer history as a nation there's Switzerland. Uri, Schwyz, and Unterwalden formed the Swiss Confederation in 1291. Unterwalden became/returned-to-being Obwalden and Nidwalden in the fourteenth century by the looks of it. Anyway those three (really 4) cantons all look to have traditionally been German-speaking Catholics, but the Swiss allow a fair degree of cantonal autonomy so maybe even those four have their differences.

In the Americas Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela look to be federal republics. Not sure if I know enough on Argentina and Venezuela to know of their regionalism, but Brazil and Mexico both have some. I believe some of the more indigenous states in the Mexican South, like Chiapas, have some noteworthy differences or issues.
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Old 03-11-2012, 04:08 PM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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The UK has strong regional identities.

As Ben mentioned, Yorkshire has a very distinct culture, it's own flag and anthem. I proclaim Leeds to be the modern-day capital.
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Old 03-11-2012, 04:12 PM
 
Location: Yorkshire, England
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
If Saturday Night Live did a skit like that on a guy from Oklahoma or West Virginia, there'd be hell to pay. Especially if he made a remark acknowledging that there was a black guy in the room.
Really? I grew up in Yorkshire (left pretty much first chance I got though) and think it's hilarious because there's so much truth in it! Re. the black guy, that sketch was made 20 years ago - the idea that somebody from Yorkshire would be shocked to see a black guy just seems odd now, as the (few) ones we do have are fairly well integrated so it's a non-issue. A comedian could make a joke about the relatively unintegrated Muslim communities in some of our former mill towns, but get it wrong and then there really could be hell to pay...
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Old 03-11-2012, 04:28 PM
 
Location: Toronto
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Watching this kind of sketch comedy (though its the 90s) -- watch to the end! I have a feeling that the ending of that sketch wouldn't be something they'd be allowed to care to depict/laugh at in America!


The Coopers: Pub Lunch sketch - Goodness Gracious Me - BBC Comedy - YouTube

I watched some comedies like that online, and it seems that the Brits do a pretty good job actually of making the "ethnic jokes" in a way that is not crude (US discourse on ethnic humour seems to be either plain, or else they are overly politically correct in a way that is "too out of the way that its awkward"), and many Brits aren't as obsessed with that (many Brits of any race seem less crazy about ethnic "identity politics" the way Americans are to begin with it seems).

I don't know if its just me, but on the other hand when it comes to religion with Muslims, I hear about weird, bend-over-backwards things happening in the UK on the news or online (maybe its just media sensationalism and isn't reliable/full of hot air) like school libraries pulling off books about the "three little pigs" (something like that?) because they'd think just the presence of "pigs" offend Muslims' kids or something...lol .
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Old 03-11-2012, 08:34 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Originally Posted by ben86 View Post
Yorkshire is generally considered a county, though these days technically it's divided into separate counties of North Yorkshire/West Yorkshire etc and is big enough to be considered a separate region (generally alongside Humberside, which itself used to be largely a part of Yorkshire but now no longer exists...I wish our counties made sense like states/provinces etc do in other countries!) Yorkshiremen have a strong county identity, probably the strongest of any English county. Among other things we have a reputation for being unsophisticated and plain-spoken, which living down here I take advantage of at every opportunity by using it as an excuse to make un-PC comments and get away with it like this guy (I know people who actually are like this!)


HARRY ENFIELD- THE YORKSHIREMAN - YouTube
Bloody hilarious!
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Old 03-11-2012, 08:36 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Originally Posted by bale002 View Post
To be sure, regional identity is strong in Italy, and just as strong, if not stronger, is identity by town, if big enough, usually the size of a provincial capital, maybe even smaller in some cases.

As for the US, I would be careful about blanket statements: for as much as some people remain in one state, even town, for generations, others move from state to state based on economic opportunities, change of climate, period of life, etc., and people can change their identity based on where they are.

Comparing Italy and the US, in the former regional/town identity definitely outweighs national identity by far, while in the latter I would say, on balance, national identity outweighs regional/town identities, though to a significantly lesser extent than the contrary is the case in Italy.

Personally I have lived in several countries and while in each one in almost all cases I felt affinity for the region/province/town that I've lived in rather than for the country as a whole.

There are many nation-states with internal separatist movements; within the English-speaking world, Canada and UK are perfect examples, but there are many others. Nonetheless, for the most part, these separatist movements have not been successful.

Though I have viewed national central governments as mostly a mostly a burden, even a necessary evil, on the other hand possible alternatives to the modern nation-state are not necessarily better.

How to educate and govern ourselves has been a vexed human social question since the dawn of history, and, as history clearly shows, they are subject to change, sometimes forever and not necessarily for better.

Good Luck!

Yes the Italian states, especially the city states, existed long before Italy the nation did, and being such traditional societies that's hardly surprising. I think national identity is usually something that is in a way forced upon to people; it's not something that comes naturally to most.
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Old 03-11-2012, 08:38 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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I hear the Quebecois are still proud Canadians - I'm not even sure that most even do want to break away anymore, since they benefit a lot from Canada's economy. I have a feeling the younger generation aren't so parochial about their French identity - like it's something they are proud of, but they don't need to constantly push away the Anglo-influence anymore.
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Old 03-12-2012, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hadrett32 View Post
In regard to Canada most "Quebecois" have a very strong provincial and cultural identity due to their different background (primarily French-Acadians; French-speaking).
Quebecers are not primarily "French-Acadians", though some are. France actually had two colonies in this part of the world: New France and Acadia. Most Quebecers are descendants of the colonists of New France. The people who settled Acadia (in present-day Atlantic Canada) also came from France, although generally not from the same regions than the people of New France came from.

People familiar with Acadians and Quebecers can tell typical Acadien and Québécois surnames apart, although because of migration and mixing over time surnames from each group can be found in either group's territory.
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Old 03-12-2012, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
I hear the Quebecois are still proud Canadians - I'm not even sure that most even do want to break away anymore, since they benefit a lot from Canada's economy. I have a feeling the younger generation aren't so parochial about their French identity - like it's something they are proud of, but they don't need to constantly push away the Anglo-influence anymore.
Not all Québécois are proud Canadians, though a lot of them are. The separatist movement is in the doldrums at the moment but is certainly far from dead.

And even most non-separatist Québécois tend to consider Quebec to be the "nation" and their presence in Canada to be a larger, loose "federal" arrangement similar to the European Union. Of course, this is not the reality on the ground but what can I say - people think what they want to think.
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Old 03-12-2012, 09:09 AM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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Quebec is bankrupt and deeply in debt, they cannot afford to leave, and have been dubbed Canada's Greece on occasion
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