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Old 03-27-2012, 09:56 AM
 
30,958 posts, read 31,884,093 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mulhall View Post
Good point and countries like China and India are increasingly becoming the same as manufacturing and industrialisation takes hold. Many Chinese people work extremely long hours in factories and see more of their work collegues than their family.
In China it is quite common for one of the spouses in a marriage to live and work in another province and be away from home a lot.

I would add Israel to the medium category.
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Old 03-27-2012, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Toronto
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What about all the Asian working labourers (many from India etc.) that go to somewhere like Dubai to do their lengthy and hard jobs, leaving their family behind and being rarely able to see their family? That's another example.

In the modern era, things that like will become only more, not less common.
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Old 03-27-2012, 10:01 AM
 
Location: St.Petesburg
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Russia ranks the medium And I agree that.Sure,here in big cities like St.Petesburg and Moscow and Novasibirsk the rate is lower but the rest of the country still values family.
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Old 03-27-2012, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Chicago
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I think you've underestimated the family values of Japan.
There's so many young adults still living with their parents. And it's not only just because of financial reasons. If you've seen families outside or even in Tokyo suburbs, you'll see them.

Also unlike US or UK, nursing homes are not quite as popular in Japan. The Japanese have so much respect to their elders.
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Old 03-27-2012, 10:38 PM
 
Location: Toronto
3,338 posts, read 5,636,106 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
By modern I mean fairly modern, as most people live a 'non-traditional life' (i.e. village farming.etc.). Even if the country is mostly rural, city folk tend to also be very family orientated.
That's the thing though -- a lot of the countries that are seen as family oriented are only so because they live in places with such little mobility (eg. live in the same town or village most of their lives) or in lifestyles that they have had to rely on family more. In some places, family connections can land you a job etc. It's those places where who you know matters etc. and who your family (or class or clan, or tribe or caste) is matters.

Perhaps some of them don't even choose to be family oriented (maybe they hate their extended family or their town or something, but don't nearly have the mobility that a first worlder like you and I have to do something about it or they have limited options that seem more appealing than continuing to work on the family farm or family business).

Sometimes people underestimate "circumstance" as opposed to willful choice of "culture" in determining things.

A good "thought experiment" is if every "family oriented" culture that is a developing/rural one had the same living standards/mobility and access to city jobs in a diverse number of fields and locations etc. that western nations do, would they still choose to do the whole extended family thing? Perhaps then can we say that they are family-oriented out of choice rather than circumstance.

After all, for most of human history, people had no choice but to be with family groups as part of "the tribe" or whatever group they stuck with for a long part of life.
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Old 03-28-2012, 12:02 AM
 
618 posts, read 2,546,812 times
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East Asian countries.
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Old 01-21-2019, 07:04 PM
AFP
 
6,330 posts, read 3,852,978 times
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I'm not sure why the Op included living with the extended family as criteria. How are we supposed to evaluate different cultures when most of us are casual observers. I've interacted with people of different cultures some seem quite family oriented but dysfunctional by western standards with different values in some cases what some of these cultures value I consider undesirable it varies and relies heavily on the criteria used to judge.
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Old 01-21-2019, 08:59 PM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
3,054 posts, read 1,116,483 times
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I was talking to a Ukrainian friend about retirement there. She said separate living for seniors is very rare, but nowadays, when several generations live together, they grow to resent each other. So a statistical fact may not reflect accurately a spiritual acceptance.

Ukraine might be the world's highest contrast between modern cultural values and low GDP.
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Old 01-21-2019, 09:17 PM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston
34,667 posts, read 53,214,839 times
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So, modern cultural values is NOT to live together with other family members?
What about family that owns a big, multilevel house where each generation lives practically separate, but rely on each other as needed?
Like grandparents taking care of grandkids while their parents work? Or taking care of the elderly instead of dumping them in nursing homes?
It ties the family together, teach family values and saves money... No?
There are many modern societies that practice that model and no one is frowned upon.
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Old 01-21-2019, 11:03 PM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
3,054 posts, read 1,116,483 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elnina View Post
So, modern cultural values is NOT to live together with other family members?
What about family that owns a big, multilevel house where each generation lives practically separate, but rely on each other as needed?
Like grandparents taking care of grandkids while their parents work? Or taking care of the elderly instead of dumping them in nursing homes?
It ties the family together, teach family values and saves money... No?
There are many modern societies that practice that model and no one is frowned upon.
Modern cultural value is a complex of many elements, only a small part of which is living arrangements. And not many family homes in Ukraine fit your description, which is why I contrasted the cultural value with its affordability in the current economy. I''m only passing on the view of a Ukrainian friend, not my own.
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