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Old 06-14-2012, 01:20 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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I just want to get an idea of how the widespread this fairly modern trend of 'leaving the nest', either for college, work, or just to 'find your sense' or see how you manage on your own two feet is in the world.

I heard most 30 year old Italians still live with their parents, for a variety of reasons. First because Italians don't move around as much, rents can be expensive, and it's practical and of course the culture: Italy is far more family-orientated than say Northern Europe.

I know in the Anglo countries it's more expected that you're not living with mummy and daddy past the age of about 25 unless you have a good reason to. Those over this age are sometimes considered 'losers.' I notice more and more people here doing that, due to the price of housing/rents, and it's no longer see as a 'rite of passage' to leave at age 18, 21.

Any idea what it's like in other countries? Europe, Asia, Africa, Latin America? Is it most common to live with one's family until marriage or unless one has to re-locate? I think this is also the case in SE Asian nations.
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Old 06-14-2012, 01:45 AM
 
Location: Brisbane
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In South Korea its very common for the kids to stay at home until they are married Trimac.

It breads an interesting generation of people, most of the korean borders we have had are in their late 20's or early 30's, and dont have cooking skills beyond frying eggs, putting rice in rice cooker and boilng two minute noodles.

Last edited by danielsa1775; 06-14-2012 at 02:20 AM..
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Old 06-14-2012, 03:05 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielsa1775 View Post
In South Korea its very common for the kids to stay at home until they are married Trimac.

It breads an interesting generation of people, most of the korean borders we have had are in their late 20's or early 30's, and dont have cooking skills beyond frying eggs, putting rice in rice cooker and boilng two minute noodles.
Interesting, I was wondering about Japan and South Korea. I thought most Japanese people move out quite early but then again many do also live with their parents.

I'm not sure how true it is but apparently 25 percent of Japanese men and women over the age of 25 are still virgins.
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Old 06-14-2012, 03:26 AM
 
1,114 posts, read 1,499,524 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
I just want to get an idea of how the widespread this fairly modern trend of 'leaving the nest', either for college, work, or just to 'find your sense' or see how you manage on your own two feet is in the world.

I heard most 30 year old Italians still live with their parents, for a variety of reasons. First because Italians don't move around as much, rents can be expensive, and it's practical and of course the culture: Italy is far more family-orientated than say Northern Europe.
You're right: I am italian and can assure you that italians live with their parents even when they are 40 years old
But the main reason is the cost of living, not the family-orientated culture (which it is in fact a myth): renting or buying anything has become unbelievably expensive in Rome and Milan... such cities may look cheap to an american, but you have to understand that Italy wages are LOW!
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Old 06-14-2012, 06:47 AM
 
Location: Purgatory
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I applaud it. I respect countries where families stick together, even if it's for economic reasons.
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Old 06-14-2012, 06:50 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Originally Posted by dragonborn View Post
I applaud it. I respect countries where families stick together, even if it's for economic reasons.
Yes, I mean if the kids and parents can get along (i.e. kids contributing to household chores.etc, and parents respecting their child to be an independent adult) and it suits both of them, I don't see what's so bad about remaining together as a family unit. In many nations grandparents do indeed live with the family, it's great for the grandchildren to have those role models.
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Old 06-14-2012, 12:18 PM
 
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In South Korea and Japan kids stay at home for a number of reasons, most notably the high cost of rent that makes it prohibitive for someone just out of college to rent or buy in a city, and the closer family ties in those countries.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dragonborn View Post
I applaud it. I respect countries where families stick together, even if it's for economic reasons.

Yes, and though most Americans like to pride themselves in their "independence" (lol), for a very long time in the US it was common for families to stick together and for children to live at home until marriage. Of course, when people were getting married at 17, 18, 22, it didn't feel like they were staying at home that long, but still. The Boomerang Generation "trend" isn't exactly new in the US, and we could probably learn something from the countries where families are more function than form.
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Old 06-14-2012, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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Not here.
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Old 06-14-2012, 01:30 PM
 
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Traditionally in India, many generations would live under the same roof, even after the kids get married and have their own.

Nowadays, with kids finding jobs in other cities, you would see them moving out of their parents home once they find a job. That is what I did.

Yet I have many friends who have this burning desire to find a job back in their native towns so that they can live again with their family.
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Old 06-14-2012, 02:03 PM
 
376 posts, read 609,178 times
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Originally Posted by italianuser View Post
You're right: I am italian and can assure you that italians live with their parents even when they are 40 years old
But the main reason is the cost of living, not the family-orientated culture (which it is in fact a myth): renting or buying anything has become unbelievably expensive in Rome and Milan... such cities may look cheap to an american, but you have to understand that Italy wages are LOW!
I lived in Italy for five years. There I met several Italians that lived at home. I met a few that lived alone, independently!
Why don't Italian just move in with their friends, rent rooms for freedom? I was always afraid to ask the Italians I met that question for fear of sounding too nosy or something. I left home at 17, because I got the travel bug and I always wanted my own freedom. So this phenomenon boggles my mind! Where I am from, D.C. is not cheap either but I managed. Got by somehow, eating ramen noodles almost everynight, but I got by!
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