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Old 06-22-2012, 05:33 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GreyKarast View Post
I studied engineering count from class 8, descriptive geometry in the 10-11 as prepare for the entrance exams to the universities. Physics, chemistry study with 5-6 grades and up to the end, comes out to study it for 5-6 years. In schools more and more new objects, and so they are already more than 2 tens of. and if we take all of the objects which have been studied throughout the school there will be more than 3 dozen
However I've heard that the quality of study ( math for example) has significantly dropped comparably with Soviet times, ( at least in Moscow.)
Is it true for your region as well?
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Old 06-22-2012, 05:37 PM
 
Location: State Fire and Ice
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erasure View Post
However I've heard that the quality of study ( math for example) has significantly dropped comparably with Soviet times, ( at least in Moscow.)
Is it true for your region as well?
With regard specifically to the Kamchatka graduates of our schools are among the best in Russia and come to any of the universities of the country or abroad without problems. But I think you are right In the Soviet times have been still stronger than the teachers.
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Old 06-22-2012, 05:43 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GreyKarast View Post
With regard specifically to the Kamchatka graduates of our schools are among the best in Russia and come to any of the universities of the country or abroad without problems. But I think you are right In the Soviet times have been still stronger than the teachers.
OK, so the quality of math/science education was overall better during Soviet times?
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Old 06-22-2012, 06:06 PM
 
Location: State Fire and Ice
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erasure View Post
OK, so the quality of math/science education was overall better during Soviet times?
Yes I agree! If to speak in General! Textbooks much more interesting clearer and better-date. Sometimes in order to understand something trying to find the textbooks of the Soviet Union is very old years, then it is all very well understood. this happens even when he studied at the universities of.old textbooks still Soviet times better, and the compiled than the modern (it explained the recent proposals)

Last edited by GreyKarast; 06-22-2012 at 06:14 PM..
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Old 06-22-2012, 06:23 PM
 
Location: State Fire and Ice
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I believe that abroad in the schools of geography and history should be a compulsory subject, we live in the modern world and it is for me personally wildly not know elementary geography, especially if it comes from officials. For example Chancellor of Germany. Not so long ago, she came to one of the schools of Germany, she was invited to the disciples show Berlin, she had it on the map could not be found, showed the first in Russia, then in Scandinavia. It's a shame! Especially for such a person, in such a rank of the authorities.I think many will agree with me, or I am wrong?
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Old 06-22-2012, 06:43 PM
 
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Schools are different in Ireland. Some schools make you do stuff and others dont. I will tell you what it was like going to school here.

First off was junior infants and senior infants and then you go into first class and that goes up to sixth class and thats your eight years of primary school done. Kids get 2 days off in October for half term and then they get off on the 22dn or 23rd of December for Christmas and will go back around the 8th or 9th of January. They then get two days off in Febuary for mid term and a couple of days off for Paddy's Day. Easter is two weeks and then they get two months off in the summer from start of July to early Septmeber. Uniforms are needed in most schools. We never had P.E in primary school but rather the teacher would just let us out to play football every Friday afer big lunch. Schools started at 9am and finished at 2:30pm. Little lunch was at 10:20am and was for 15 minutes. Big lunch was at 12:20pm for half an hour/45 minutes.

After primary school there was secondary school which goes from 1st year to 6th year. 1st to 3rd year you are studying for the Junior Cert which is at the end of 3rd year. After that there is a year called transition year and it is now compulsory in a lot of schools but not in all schools. Its a year were you go on trips and dont do much work and have fun but it was a waste of time if I am honest. Then there is 5th and 6th year were you are studying for the Leaving Cert and thats your big exams which come at the end of 6th year. We had to wear a uniform as does most secondary schools in the ROI. Most secondary schools get a half day once a week. Mine was on Wednesday. We started school at 8:35am and finished at 3:20pm. I had 2 hours of P.E in transition year but 80 minutes in all the other years. There was 9 classes a day lasting 40 minutes each. So I would start at 8:35am and get off at 3:20pm but on a Wednesday I would get off at 12:50pm. We got a mid term for a week in October and the same in Febuary. Christmas holidays was on the 21st or 22nd or 23rd but I just didn't go in after the 21st and we got back around the 9th of Jan. Easter was 2 weeks and a few days for Paddy's Day. Then we got 3 months off in the summer from the start of June to around the 28th of August. Transition year students got off around the 18th of May.
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Old 06-22-2012, 06:50 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
Science, Math and English the three lessons that are a necessity. Others like geography, chemistry etc are not necessary.
In Ireland there is 4 compulsory subjects. Englsih, Irish, maths and then another language(French, German etc..) You dont have to do science for the Leaving Cert(A levels) but you do for the Junior Cert(GCSEs)
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Old 06-22-2012, 07:40 PM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
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I actually made a thread very similar to this one in the not-so-distant past, but because there are "subtle differences", and I have a lot of time, I'll make up a new response.

I assume you are not including the tertiary level (university) of education in your definition of "school", which simplifies matters somewhat. So here goes:

Before the age of 5, school is non-compulsory and a generally private matter that depends largely on parental preference. My stay-at-home mom brought me at the age of 3 to the local "Head Start" program, and later (when we moved up north) to a preschool every other weekday at a local Lutheran church. I think of preschool as a more-or-less structured, educational form of daycare (which, to be honest, I've never been in).

Public school districts may or may not have pre-school programs, but all have the kindergarten through 12th grade levels, often abbreviated as "K-12", which acts as a combining acronym for the primary and secondary levels of education.

A few tricky definitions to get out of the way first...

Grade is a term that describes the level of a certain student, or the entire body of students in that level, or the level itself. Usually these correspond to age. First grade corresponds to ages 7-8 (born between July and June in a given year), sixth grade corresponds to ages 11-12, ninth grade to ages 14-15, and twelfth-grade to ages 17 to 18. It is possible to be held back a grade, especially in high school, but this is not the norm.

Class can mean three things. First, it can refer to an individual course, for example Home Economics or Biochemistry or Algebra; second, it can refer to a course taught by an instructor who meets at regular times from the student's perspective; for example, Lars Larson is not in Kenny Jackson's third-hour (10:15) algebra class taught by Mrs. Lopez but instead has the same teacher and course during seventh-hour (2:00); and third, it can mean a whole grade of students in one school or all schools considered together as a collective body, usually in view of the year they will graduate. For example, the "Class of 2005" at Lincoln High School had 300 students in September 2001. The crop of future Kindergartners that will begin attending school in September are the "Class of 2026" (hard to believe!).

The same school year applies to all grades in the district, which locally is from the day after Labor Day (a Tuesday in early September) to the second week after Memorial Day, usually around June 5th. "Winter" (Christmas), President's Week (February), and "Spring" (Easter) vacations are all at least a week in length. Except for Kindergarten, school is attended Monday through Friday for roughly seven hours each day. The middle school class hours in my school district were from 8:00 am to 2:41 pm; the high school class hours, 8:00 am to 2:44 pm. The elementary school hours are about an hour ahead to allow the buses sufficient time to drop off their students. The school day at all levels is broken up around 11 am to noon for school lunch and recess, which for the younger students consists of going on the playground, and for older students of socializing with their social circles.

The curriculum is not heavily standardized by any body, but teachers are expected to meet certain outcomes as measured by standardized tests beginning in 2nd grade or so and ending with tests required for graduation in 12th grade.

At the age of 5, children are enrolled in their local Kindergarten, which is the first year of elementary school. For me, kindergarten was every other weekday; in some school districts, it runs on time shifts (morning / afternoon), while others have implemented every-day kindergarten. Students usually start riding the school bus to school in kindergarten.

First grade (ages 6-7) marks the beginning of compulsory, daily education in (as far as I know) every state, and is the first year in which reading and writing are taught, and the average student becomes literate then. A large number of students, however, learn to read and write under the tutelage of their parents prior to first grade, and a large number of late-bloomers leave first grade illiterate. First grade is also when addition and subtraction are taught.

In second grade (ages 7-8), students learn to multiply, and in third grade (ages 8-9) students learnedlong division and cursive. Whether cursive is taught or not today depends on the school.

In later elementary grades, these and other basic skills are developed and elaborated upon. An elementary school student is with his or her classroom all day. Academic school subjects are all taught by one teacher, while students are taught music, art, and physical education by specialists, often in separate rooms (e.g. an elementary school will have a "music room", a gym, etc.) but with the same students that are in their classroom at other hours of the day.

A large minority of students, particularly in the elementary school years, have special needs that are not so serious as to necessitate excluding them entirely or even most of the day from the normal classroom, but must be worked on for part of the school day. For example, many students have mild speech disorders that render them unable to instinctively and correctly produce certain sounds common in the English language (/r/, /þ/, /ð/, /s/, /z/, etc.), which left untreated will have social and employment consequences as they get older. These students are identified in Kindergarten or 1st Grade and receive sessions with a speech-language pathologist employed by the school system until they are able to spontaneously articulate whatever phonemes they had difficulty with. Some students have problems with fine or gross motor skills, others with issues of a behavioral nature. At least when I went to school, students were taken out of their class for these sessions. The same goes for gifted and talented programs in the school districts where they are present; a particularly bright student might work with a specialist on more advanced material while the rest of the class learns math lessons that they mastered years ago.

The heterogeneity of the American education system leads to a lot of diversity in the classes accommodated by elementary school facilities. Some run from kindergarten to 3rd grade, others from kindergarten to 6th grade. If the arrangement is such that, for example, students go to one building for kindergarten through 4th grade and another for 5th grade through 8th grade, 5th and (sometimes) 6th grade will be taught in the same style as 3rd or 4th grade, with the class staying with a single instructor throughout most of the day.

The next stage in the American educational system is middle school or junior high school, two "similar but different" approaches to educating students roughly 11 to 14 years of age, or in the 6th through 8th grade. The middle school approach seems to be much more common than the junior high school approach, but from the student's perspective, they are difficult to tell apart. In both, students have lockers, where they keep their personal effects, textbooks, notebooks, and folders. They switch classrooms and teachers for each course, and usually have 3 or 4 minutes to go from the class to their locker to the next class. All students do this roughly 7 or 8 times a day. Each class is composed of a different set of students, so Jose Garcia may have John Smith in his English class but not in his Math class. However, classes tend to have students exclusively from the same grade (which is confusingly also known as "class" as in "Class of 2005"), even when advanced classes where the subject material is identical to what is taught in a higher grade (e.g. the "advanced math" classes where I went taught the same things that most students would learn in the next grade, but were composed of students solely from the present grade). Teachers, if I need to note, are specialized in what they instruct and often the grade they instruct, so Mr. Anderson might teach six 7th-grade math classes while Mrs. Johnson might teach six 8th-grade English classes. This creates a consciousness of other students in the grade and a "class spirit" (class referring to grade, often called "generation" in other countries) that does not exist at earlier levels, where students only switch classes every year.

Students have most of their classes assigned for them in middle school, but have a choice in what music class they will take (at my school it was band, choir, or general music), and where offered, probably foreign language.

Middle school is a tumultuous time in most people's lives, in which they are dealing with physical and intellectual changes in their own lives as well as a disparity in how developed their peers are. Compounding this is the fact that middle school is often the first time in which students have to change into their gym clothes in locker rooms with their peers. It also coincides with the time when most students are first attracted to the opposite sex (in a major way). Boys and girls feel an attraction towards certain members of the opposite sex, which they describe as "liking", and pair off with them, some as early as the third or fourth grade but most in sixth or seventh grade. These relationships, which students refer to as "going out", usually last in the range of weeks or sometimes months. Schools hold "school dances" beginning in sixth or seventh grade, which unite the entire middle school in the gym with a professional DJ, who plays wedding reception classics like "YMCA", "safe" current hits (edited if need be), all broken up by the occasional slow dance. Immediately before the slow dance, boys and girls wishing to dance awkwardly gather together on opposite sides of the gym floor. For a "paired off" student, the choice of whom to dance with is natural, but for a "single" kid, the pressure and risk in choosing a partner is hard to fathom. Some girls will go to the lobby during the slow dance to console a girl, whose admired boy danced with another girl or rejected her or something.

Middle school is also significant in terms of extracurricular activities. In elementary school most extracurriculars are sponsored by community organizations; for example, HAHA handles hockey and HYSA handles soccer. In middle school, official school sponsorship of some sports begins, and students, if sufficiently gifted, may play on high school teams, which receive extensive media coverage.

Exiting middle school and entering high school is a significant milestone in an American student's life. For one thing, most high schools are much larger than middle schools; often several middle schools "feed" into a high school. Students in each grade are required to take certain courses, but for the rest of the day they can choose whatever classes they have the necessary prerequisites for. As a rule, larger high schools have a better course selection than smaller high schools, as well as more specialized facilities. These courses, unlike middle school, often are attended by students of every grade in the high school. Students, if their ranking within their grade qualifies them, can also choose harder course material, such as Advanced Placement courses, or locally even (in the latter years of high school) attend a university for both high school and university credit, which the State pays for.

This varies depending on locality, but most students in my high school took driver's education either as freshmen (9th graders; 14-15 year olds) or sophomores (10th graders; 15-16 year olds) and earned their driver's license in 10th or 11th grade, often on their 16th birthday or shortly after, and began driving to school and parking in the student parking lot. By 12th grade - the last year of high school - if you're not driving yourself or hitching a ride from another friend, you were an outcast. School bus ridership drops sharply beginning in 9th grade as students ride to school with nearby older students.

American high schools are most notable for their "school spirit". This is fomented by having athletic teams that belong to the high school in many sports, but most notably football (in most parts of the country), hockey (in some northern states, especially Minnesota), and basketball (in high schools with a large percentage of African-American students). These are members of leagues which extend up to the state level. The state hockey tournament in particular is a major event throughout all of Minnesota which is televised. Teams going off to regional or state tournaments often have assemblies thrown for them, in which classes are officially interrupted as entire student body assembles in the gym to "send off" the team. Assemblies are held for various other reasons at both the middle and high school levels; for example, the high school I went to has a week of assemblies for entering (9th grade or "freshman") students devoted to resolving conflicts and strengthening class spirit, while 12th graders assemble for a day of bowling, pizza, and tearful discussion facilitated by professionals at the end of the year. The schools usually also have a few "fun" weeks during the year, in which assemblies and dances are common and students are invited to go to school in their pajamas, dress up in various costumes, etc.

Another thing about high school in America that seems to be discussed only rarely outside the U.S. is the real risk of failing a grade and being held back. In middle school and especially elementary school, this is rare; students who fall behind are usually taken out of their normal classroom for part of the day and placed into classes that are variously known as "Special Ed", "Resource Lab", etc. where they can receive more individualized attention, while retaining promotion to the next grade level. Even students who are simply lazy and mischevious are simply promoted to the next grade level in all but some cases.

In high school, the system is strictly credit-based. Say each full-time class counts for 2 credits a semester, and you need to accumulate 24 credits to advance from 9th grade (freshman) to 10th grade (sophmore). If you fail, say, Algebra and Physical Science, and come short of the required 24 credits by the end of the school year (June) and fail to make the credits up during the summer through summer school or the internet, come September you will be considered a freshman while most of the rest of your age peers will be considered sophmores. Your picture and name will even be found in the Freshman section of the flashy, hardbound yearbooks that most high school students buy.

Students at risk of dropping out of high school have some options available for them: examples include "focus classes", which meet in small groups and emphasize improving the students' weak points, and "work study", a program that allows students to attain high school credits and even fulfill subject prerequisites by working for a private company.

To graduate, students need to have a minimum number of credits, to have taken specific required classes, and to have passed state tests in certain subject areas. The real issue for most students is not passing the state tests, but obtaining the highest score college admission tests administered by private corporations.

Last edited by tvdxer; 06-22-2012 at 07:57 PM..
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Old 06-22-2012, 09:10 PM
 
Location: US Empire, Pac NW
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Here most private schools are religious, is that the case in the US? Fees range from as low as $4000 a year for some of the Catholic/Baptist colleges, to as high as $30,000 for some of the most prestigious in the country, such as the King's School in Sydney. I think in Perth some are as high as $15,000, and many of these are over 100 years old.

We don't have 'junior high school' or 'middle school' here, either, seems strange there's a separate school for just a few years!
Many private schools here are religious. I attended private Catholic primary and secondary schools. Though, it is ingrained in the local culture. I grew up in a historically Catholic Irish and Polish area. When the city expanded in the 1920s to include the area I grew up in, they already had a well developed Catholic system, so there wasn't much need to have public schools there. And in Chicago, yeah, I'm glad I attended a private system. Much better quality.
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Old 06-22-2012, 10:07 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Another point about Canadian schools: kids go play outside at recess and lunch regardless of weather. Except if it is pouring rain. My kids' school's cut-off for ''too cold'' for playing outside is -20 C in the winter. This is quite typical for Canada.

So this means that at -17 C my kids will be outside for about 2 hours during the course of the day.
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