U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-30-2017, 04:12 PM
 
1,675 posts, read 912,969 times
Reputation: 1017

Advertisements

Pretty much, I share very few similarities with people from my region (eastern europe: I don't drink, don't have blue eyes or blond hair, not americanophile, not living in western europe...). Other than my love for soccer there are few things that make me obviously from Europe overrall.
I feel like I belong somewhere in the middle east or asia, I've lived in Dubai years ago and liked it but given a chance will pick some other place these days, I feel like Dubai's glory days are over.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-30-2017, 06:19 PM
 
1,070 posts, read 496,255 times
Reputation: 960
In my childhood and adulthood, I never managed to meet my social or career expectations while living in the US. It all happened outside of the country.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 01:02 PM
 
1,202 posts, read 1,916,851 times
Reputation: 984
Born in the Mid-West U.S., but I feel more and more Canadian, a civilized country compared to America. The only problem I have with Canada----the Queen of England is on their currency, and I don't want to have anything to do with a monarchy that has a state sanctioned religion-----very backward.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 03:42 PM
 
Location: London, United Kingdom
5,746 posts, read 6,200,253 times
Reputation: 6220
Adjusting to living in the United Kingdom took a few weeks and am still learning on the spot even today.

I remember the day I arrived. Right after I left the airport I had to go to the hotel I was staying in and check in. After I dropped all of my things in the room, I went out to the store to get some essential things. Being that I am from the United States, my electronic devices were purchased in America, so I needed the power adapter converter, otherwise I wouldn't be able to re-charge any of the batteries on any of my things. The very first thing I noticed was the difference in currency, the pricing for all the things I was looking at was numerically off from what I was used to in the United States, that tends to happen when you leave the United States for another country with a different currency with different currency values. Over the next few days I would have to do a lot of errands to finalize the details involved with my flat and grow accustomed to the style of English spoken in London. Essentially people in London speak English, just like Americans speak English but they spell things differently (even if slightly) and pronounce things entirely differently. There is also a massive chunk of English words that are spoken and used frequently in London that people do not use in America, at all, majority of the Americans wouldn't even know most of the words we use in London even exist in the English language because they aren't taught, spoken, or used even a little in America. For example, in my first year someone called me a "chancer" and I didn't know what the hell that meant so I asked him and he said (to paraphrase) "someone that tries to maximize every opportunity given to them". Cars drive on the other side of the street from everywhere in America, traffic regulations are very different from America, the metrics used are different from America, and people act differently in London. Regulations and the political system is entirely different from America, a country with a written Bill of Rights versus the United Kingdom a place that goes off well understood morals and values to regulate the atmosphere in a parliamentary system.

People in London are more prone to staying to themselves, polite nonetheless but very much staying in their own lanes unless they have to step out of that role. In America, it's much more open field, people approach others with inquiries, concerns, or tidbits regularly and at times can be invasive even if not intentionally so.

Londoners are much more cerebral people than anywhere I've ever lived other than Singapore. It isn't even close. Thoughts and longterm thinking is the norm here, whereas that's largely a burdensome quality in America. I happen to fit into London splendidly because my personality fits amongst the people here infinitely better than it ever did in America. I love Londoners, tremendous people and they actually do come across like people that have a brain up in that head of theirs as opposed to everywhere I lived in America where people and their public demonstration of knowledge comes across as limited at-best (not trying to be offensive but just trying to be honest).

Learning how to get around here took some time to get adjusted to living without an automobile, I had to familiarize myself with the London Underground system because that along with walking would be my only means to getting around here. Had to learn what people meant by what they said here because they spoke with different terminology than what I was used to in America, hell, people I come across with on a daily basis here use words that I didn't even know existed in the English language. Like lots of that. Now I understand why it is when you buy a new laptop and turn it on the first time ever it asks you what language to set up on the laptop and gives you multiple English options (i.e.; 1) English U.S.; 2) English U.K.; 3) English Australia and New Zealand, so on). It is because autofill and spellcheck is modified for each branch of the English language that deviates from other variations of the same language. Getting used to the street layout here took a while and I'm still learning and adapting to way of life here on a day-to-day basis.

So while I cannot say that I truly fit in the United Kingdom given that I haven't seen most of it to know how I would fit in with it, I can say that from what I have seen in London, that I fit here infinitely more than where I grew up which was America or where I was born which was Singapore.

London is a thinking man's town. That's what I really love about this place, a lot.

Last edited by Facts Kill Rhetoric; Yesterday at 04:51 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 04:31 PM
 
6,129 posts, read 1,330,035 times
Reputation: 2243
Quote:
Originally Posted by smithy77 View Post
Born in the Mid-West U.S., but I feel more and more Canadian, a civilized country compared to America. The only problem I have with Canada----the Queen of England is on their currency, and I don't want to have anything to do with a monarchy that has a state sanctioned religion-----very backward.
I actually agree with that. I like that Canada still acknowledges the shared history that we have, as a Republican (in the traditional sense of the word) I'm not overly keen on the Queen's face appearing on our money.

Although I would say that the US actually has a more backward relationship when it comes to the relationship between politics and religion, despite the theoretical separation of church and state.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 04:38 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
17,637 posts, read 21,861,989 times
Reputation: 6940
There is no religious aspect at all to Elizabeth II's status as Queen of Canada. I say this as a non monarchist.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 05:18 AM
 
Location: South Jersey
12,522 posts, read 5,199,425 times
Reputation: 4179
At one point in time, I did. But no more I love this country.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 07:11 AM
 
Location: Canada
3,041 posts, read 2,969,547 times
Reputation: 2116
I feel like I don't belong on this planet.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
222 posts, read 40,636 times
Reputation: 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
I feel like I don't belong on this planet.
Lets go to Proxima Centauri b
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $99,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top