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Old 08-05-2014, 09:22 PM
 
147 posts, read 205,422 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by P London View Post
The southern US should be in Saudi Arabia.
Have you been? The South, especially the urban South, isn't really that different from the rest.
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Old 08-06-2014, 04:13 AM
 
Location: London, UK
9,992 posts, read 11,240,390 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caravelli View Post
Have you been? The South, especially the urban South, isn't really that different from the rest.
I know I was just pocking fun though isn't the region the best conservative though now way as conservative as Saudi Arabia!
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Old 11-22-2015, 05:13 AM
 
6,433 posts, read 6,076,228 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by asubram3 View Post
How about parts of far-Western Ukraine that used to belong to Poland? Including cities like Lviv/Lvov where Polish and Jewish people were more numerous compared to Ukrainians. The whole area was annexed by the USSR after WW2.
Lviv/Lvov/Lemberg. Most Central European cities have German or Yiddish names in addition to the names used by the ruling country. Bratislava/Pressburg is another example.
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Old 11-22-2015, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,661 posts, read 80,701,679 times
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Nagorno-Karabach, officially a part of Azerbaijan, has broken away and declared itself a part of Armenia, and Azerbaijan doesn't really seem to care, and is doing nothing to enforce the old borders.

The Soviet Union intentionally arranged the borders of the Central Asian -Stans so that each of them would have mixed and overlapping populations, to discourage nationalistic uprisings. So there are a lot of places where the local population "belongs" on the other side of the border. Like the city of Osh, the second largest city in Kyrgyzstan, is entirely Uzbek by culture, but on the Kyrgyz side of the border.

At the end of Soviet rule, the capital of Kyrgyzstan was almost entirely populated by ethnic Russians, with only a 12% Kyrgyz minority. Now, population growth has been almost completely Kyrgyz, currently about 70% in Bishkek..

Last edited by jtur88; 11-22-2015 at 08:50 AM..
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Old 07-13-2016, 08:51 AM
 
858 posts, read 577,455 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pjdfdsc View Post
I would say that Galicia is very similar to Portugal in culture and language, and it's part of Spain. But the Galicians might prefer to be their own country instead of joining Portugal.

I would also like to point out that the borders in Latin America are based on cultural and political identities. The borders are not natural but generally political or cultural. There are lots of similarities, of course, but the fact remains that most Latin Americans are very specific about their country. So I would say that Latin American countries are their own countries.
Yes this came in my mind. For example in the triple border of Iguazu falls, when I was there I noted that Foz do Iguaçu (Brazil) is a city like some other in the countryside of Sao Paulo, Ciudad del este (Paraguay) is a small Assunción and Puerto Iguazu (Argentina) remember a lot Buenos Aires in style and culture.

In others borders of Brazil is normal share more cultural aspects but is evident the difference.

Including among states of Brazil you know when you crossed states borders because the accent of people change, the building style of cities, the culture, the race and feature's people more predominant in the area and etc.
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Old 07-14-2016, 06:56 PM
 
35 posts, read 24,213 times
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Many parts of western Canada were initially disputed between Britain and the United States. If the provinces west of Ontario joined the US, I wouldn't lose a wink of sleep over it.
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Old 07-17-2016, 06:15 PM
 
Location: Seoul
11,584 posts, read 7,932,776 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pjdfdsc View Post
I would say that Galicia is very similar to Portugal in culture and language, and it's part of Spain. But the Galicians might prefer to be their own country instead of joining Portugal.

I would also like to point out that the borders in Latin America are based on cultural and political identities. The borders are not natural but generally political or cultural. There are lots of similarities, of course, but the fact remains that most Latin Americans are very specific about their country. So I would say that Latin American countries are their own countries.
The borders in the Amazon are totally random tho. Iquitos is probably more similar to Manaus or Belém than to typical Andean-Inca influenced Perú. I think you could also easily split Argentina into two different countries, Buenos Aires going north to Rosario could be a different country
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Old 07-17-2016, 07:00 PM
 
749 posts, read 738,242 times
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Olivença, a Portuguese town now under Spanish administration since the mid 19th century has retain a Portuguese character in spite of "hispanization" attempts.
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Old 07-17-2016, 08:58 PM
 
671 posts, read 758,277 times
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There is a Mohawk reservation that straddles the borders of Ontario, Quebec and New York. They should probably just be their own country.
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Old 07-19-2016, 09:10 PM
 
3,431 posts, read 3,780,300 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
I've heard SW New Brunswick has an accent similar to E. New England. The Minnesota accent sounds kind of Canadian.
Not true at all, at least of SW New Brunswick versus Maine. The Maine accent is very distinctive and different from a southern NB accent. My mother grew up in St. Stephen, on the border with Calais, Maine. She in no way sounds like someone from Maine.

It's peculiar, but places that are very close geographically, can have quite different accents and cultures. There are areas of northern and eastern New Brunswick that are francophone, just 30 minutes away from anglophone towns. People just didn't travel as much in rural areas back in the old days. That influenced accents.

To reply to the OP... St. Pierre and Miquelon are two small islands off the coast of Newfoundland, that are actually part of France. Much closer to Canada than France, though, clearly.
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