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Old 12-27-2012, 09:42 PM
 
Location: State Fire and Ice
3,079 posts, read 4,313,346 times
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as Ты English? you is ВЫ ,but as Ты(you )?how to differentiate you(Ты ) from you(Вы)?Help please!
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Old 12-27-2012, 09:48 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 43,189,981 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SophieLL View Post
Spanish:
Reading Jorge Luis Borges in its original language
Reading Roberto Bolaño
Julio Cortázar
Manuel Puig
Gabriel García Marquez
Juan Rulfo
Juan José Saer
Alejandra Pizarnik


and so much more....


best way of selling ANY language is good literature.
But all the authors worth reading have already been translated into English
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Old 12-27-2012, 09:50 PM
 
Location: State Fire and Ice
3,079 posts, read 4,313,346 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by object704 View Post
Russian language is stunning in its complexity. I can only compare with English, and I can't imagine using it at home with my SO, because English looks like a business language - simple and concise.

In what other language can you call a girl like that:

Ekaterina
Katerina
Katarina
Katya
Katyusha
Katyushka
Kat'ka
Kate
Kat
Katrin
Rina
Rinochka
Katenok
Kotenok
Katenochka
Katenka
Katen'ka
Katena
Katek
Kasya
Kas'ka
Kat'kin
Katyunya
Katyun'ka
Katyupusik
Katyuzlik
Katrusya
Katruzya
Katyashochka

Etc. etc. etc. And that's all (and a lot more) one and the same name.
That's right, only except Rina and Rita, this is it Margaret, Ritanya, Ritoha, Ritosha, Rituyla, Ritunya, Ritusya, Ritusha. .......
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Old 12-27-2012, 09:57 PM
 
Location: State Fire and Ice
3,079 posts, read 4,313,346 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
But all the authors worth reading have already been translated into English
Yes English rich language. But Russian richer. say English can translate any text with no loss of meaning and intonation ,on Russian. But Russian to English it is impossible. I speak of the many literary authors. The English language does not exist the words that are in Russian.
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Old 12-27-2012, 10:26 PM
 
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
5,901 posts, read 7,958,541 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
But all the authors worth reading have already been translated into English
1) thats not true
2) even if it was true, it would be much better to read them in their original language



object704: that explains why russian novels are so hard to follow sometimes (wait, who is this Rina character?? have she appeared before?? why is she acting like shes been there all along?)
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Old 12-27-2012, 10:43 PM
 
Location: State Fire and Ice
3,079 posts, read 4,313,346 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SophieLL View Post
1) thats not true
2) even if it was true, it would be much better to read them in their original language



object704: that explains why russian novels are so hard to follow sometimes (wait, who is this Rina character?? have she appeared before?? why is she acting like shes been there all along?)
I agree, but if you do not speak the language, then what to do? Only language understood by all is the language called Music
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Old 12-27-2012, 11:00 PM
 
2,803 posts, read 2,518,982 times
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Learn English - before it's obsolete! A play on Professor Henry Higgins of "Pygmalion" fame.... 'In America they haven't spoken it in years!'

As native English speaker and someone who has taken other languages: Spanish, Russian and Korean - I am NOT fluent in them, or any others as there is no need. I have learned basic conversational for French, German, Polish, for travels in the past. I enjoyed Russian the most.

I think both English and Russian have most expressive qualities to explain nuances and alliteration. Russian I liked because, while complex, the cyrillic alphabet is phonetic, so once you learn it you do not have all the many exceptions which English speakers have to learn.

As for Greykarast question about English expressing difference in "You" in Russian use of 'Tbi', or 'Bbi', the 'Bbi' variant in English I believe was, 'You All', which in some regional USA dialects (the south in particular) was contracted to Y'all and eventually I think it was assumed to cover both conditions of you (singular -individual) and You (plural- many). Don't hold me to that, though, as I am not an English language historian.

Am not as well read as the listing of French authors listed, but what comes to mind from taking Russian history long ago (University undergraduate days- also when i took all the classes offered in Russian language) they were, during their westernization period via Peter The Great, heavily influenced by the French, and if I recall accurately there was a natural affinity between the two countries for quite some time from late 17th century through 18th century (up until Napoleon and war - of course).

I have read some Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Gogol and Pushkin (translated into English) and thoroughly enjoyed them. There is a certain depth to the russian literature I have read. I think it also is characteristic of the people. Not that I have a lot of contact with Russians, but it is just the impression I have gotten from those I have met, as well as recollections from my instructor in college who was of german descent but grew up there and the Russian History classes I took. As an aside, I sure wish I would have kept up with the Russian language for the time a few years back while traveling when I met the most beautiful russian woman while touring the gardens of summer palace of Peter The Great in Tallinn Estonia.

As for the multiple ways to express one given name in Russian, I thought that is because they have so many derivatives as 'forms of endearment'. In American english I think many names are used in formative years as terms of endearment - but are abandoned as one grows beyond childhood into adolescence. Not certain that is the case, but it's a theory I have.
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Old 12-27-2012, 11:16 PM
 
2,803 posts, read 2,518,982 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GreyKarast View Post
I agree, but if you do not speak the language, then what to do? Only language understood by all is the language called Music

Indeed! Balakirev, Borodin, Glinka, Mussorgsky, Rachmaninoff, Rimsky - Korsakov, Tchaikovsky, et al
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Old 12-27-2012, 11:37 PM
 
Location: Vladivostok, Russia
122 posts, read 139,723 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GreyKarast View Post
as Ты English? you is ВЫ ,but as Ты(you )?how to differentiate you(Ты ) from you(Вы)?Help please!
V angliyskom nikak. No way in English.

Quote:
That's right, only except Rina and Rita, this is it Margaret, Ritanya, Ritoha, Ritosha, Rituyla, Ritunya, Ritusya, Ritusha. .......
Ekaterina. Not a common variant, but nevertheless possible and used.
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Old 12-27-2012, 11:42 PM
 
Location: Vladivostok, Russia
122 posts, read 139,723 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ciceropolo View Post
Russian I liked because, while complex, the cyrillic alphabet is phonetic, so once you learn it you do not have all the many exceptions which English speakers have to learn.
Judging by what I see around me nowdays (long after Soviet education is gone) - you are a bit wrong. Accept/except looks like a completely innocent mistake, comparing to what many Russians do today.

Rumor says that Belorussian (originally a dialect of an Old Russian) is sounds just like it's written.
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