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Old 12-28-2012, 12:42 AM
 
Location: State Fire and Ice
3,079 posts, read 4,333,206 times
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As for Greykarast question about English expressing difference in "You" in Russian use of 'Tbi', or 'Bbi', the 'Bbi' variant in English I believe was, 'You All', which in some regional USA dialects (the south in particular) was contracted to Y'all and eventually I think it was assumed to cover both conditions of you (singular -individual) and You (plural- many). Don't hold me to that, though, as I am not an English language historian.

Am not as well read as the listing of French authors listed, but what comes to mind from taking Russian history long ago (University undergraduate days- also when i took all the classes offered in Russian language) they were, during their westernization period via Peter The Great, heavily influenced by the French, and if I recall accurately there was a natural affinity between the two countries for quite some time from late 17th century through 18th century (up until Napoleon and war - of course).

I have read some Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Gogol and Pushkin (translated into English) and thoroughly enjoyed them. There is a certain depth to the russian literature I have read. I think it also is characteristic of the people. Not that I have a lot of contact with Russians, but it is just the impression I have gotten from those I have met, as well as recollections from my instructor in college who was of german descent but grew up there and the Russian History classes I took. As an aside, I sure wish I would have kept up with the Russian language for the time a few years back while traveling when I met the most beautiful russian woman while touring the gardens of summer palace of Peter The Great in Tallinn Estonia.

As for the multiple ways to express one given name in Russian, I thought that is because they have so many derivatives as 'forms of endearment'. In American english I think many names are used in formative years as terms of endearment - but are abandoned as one grows beyond childhood into adolescence. Not certain that is the case, but it's a theory I have.[/quote]

Thank you! Interesting opinion. I understand it means you Ты) do not have an English
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Old 12-28-2012, 03:14 AM
 
Location: State Fire and Ice
3,079 posts, read 4,333,206 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ciceropolo View Post
Indeed! Balakirev, Borodin, Glinka, Mussorgsky, Rachmaninoff, Rimsky - Korsakov, Tchaikovsky, et al
You have great knowledge of Russian culture and art! How about James Hornela contemporaries? He is just amazing! He wrote the music for such films as - The Last of the Tribe magigan, Braveheart.
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Old 12-28-2012, 03:24 AM
 
Location: State Fire and Ice
3,079 posts, read 4,333,206 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by object704 View Post
V angliyskom nikak. No way in English.


Ekaterina. Not a common variant, but nevertheless possible and used.
Ekaterina. Not a common variant? In Russia very popular option is the full name. diminutive of Katya. we even had a princess Ekaterina2
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Old 12-28-2012, 08:22 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,668 posts, read 71,850,190 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SophieLL View Post
I love Sartre, Stendhal and Camus

But those are the only ones among your list that can be compared to Borges, Bolaño and Cortazar.

In my opinion, those 3 (B,B and C) are better than the french ones (except for Sartre that could be tied with them) even when "the scarlett and the black" is one of my favourite novels ever.

The rest of the frenchs you named have nothing against the ones in mentioned in spanish, imo.
That's because most of the great French literature arose in earlier times, when the Spanish had nothing but Cervantes, whom you neglected to mention. If the only reason to learn Spanish is to read 20th century novels, you are missing out on a great deal of the world's literary treasures, no matter what language you read them in. Spanish literature only came into its own with the development of Latin American writers in the past century. It is like saying there is no point in reading anything in English except Hemingway, Faulkner and Steinbeck, and ignoring Shakespeare, Hardy, Dickens, Twain, Poe, Longfellow, Bronte, Stevenson, Melville, Austen . . . . .
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Old 12-28-2012, 08:58 AM
 
17 posts, read 34,611 times
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Arabic - more than 420 million speak it around the world!
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Old 12-28-2012, 09:29 AM
kyh
 
Location: Malaysia & Singapore
384 posts, read 1,019,710 times
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Chinese, because it's the world's largest language by native speakers (Mandarin, and together with all its various forms). Chinese script is unique and its characters beautiful. Every stroke carries a sense of poetry. The language itself is the ultimate fruit of its 5000 years of history. By learning Chinese, you can even read poetries and classics that were written thousands of years ago in its original script - the written language today is not much different from the one used in the Tang Dynasty (618 - 907 AD), unlike English (and other European languages) where Modern English users could barely understand the Old English texts. Most of the highly regarded poetries were penned in the Tang and Song Dynasties, and are still being taught in school today. Chinese language is subtle, and can convey emotions and passion that very few languages could.

Even though Mandarin and other Chinese dialects are mutually unintelligible, their written forms are universal - in Chinese script, and this could be comprehended by all Chinese-language literates. E.g., a Cantonese speaker, a Shanghainese speaker, a Mandarin speaker, and a Taiwanese speaker may not understand each other during conversation, but when their respective dialogues are written down in words, everyone could understand immediately. Thus Chinese-language websites, forums, and chatrooms are accessible to all Chinese speakers, irrespective of dialects.

Chinese character itself is an art. Chinese calligraphy can be made into treasured art pieces to be hung on the wall. As Japanese (as well as Korean, Vietnamese in their Chinese forms) borrows the script from the Chinese language, a Chinese user can read many Japanese characters that are written in kanji.

And since it's the 21st century, literacy in the Chinese language will open many doors to businesses that seek to trade with or within China and her territories.
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Old 12-28-2012, 10:58 AM
 
Location: US Empire, Pac NW
5,008 posts, read 10,493,982 times
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Hmmm ... Spanish is obvious as it opens many doors to business and travel throughout the Latin American world...

So let's try Japanese.

  1. If you decide to go into business or take a job there, you'll get an inside look into the goings-on and life there. People will be thrilled you know a basic level of understanding of the language.
  2. Meanwhile, travel through the country is easy. Most cities and even small towns have English printed with it so you know exactly where you are, and the maps on ticket machines and even some (a few LOL!) folks speak english.
  3. Japan is an interesting country with a unique history. They've also gone to great lengths to preserve facets of their society from bygone eras, to the point where even some ancient villages still use straw thatch roofs and old style rice paddies with old style tools, yet their family members have a variety of jobs, the bus stop is closeby, they have satellite TV, and there's a drinks machine a block down the road. I think the history is the biggest selling point, personally.
  4. It's a good segway into Asia. They've blended modern Western living with their culture quite effectively. Whereas each town and city has a plethora of history behind it, you can also get lost in the modern. If you're used to big-dirty-city then this may not be for you but it's still cool.
  5. Speaking of modern culture, if you're into anime at all, or are just curious, you can try going to Tokyo, Akihabara specifically, and see what all the fuss is about. While you're there, go shopping for electronics.
  6. The hot springs. While bathing naked with the same gender has gone out of fashion in the West, it's still very much alive here and it's one of those "When in Rome" things that you have to try. Don't be a prude! Yunnessun is a great resort.
  7. If you learn Japanese you de facto could probably get by, with a little help, in China, as Kanji is used by both Chinese and Japanese to represent many of the same things. Be careful though, the phonetics are different!
  8. It's a great way to brush up on your manners. Don't eat or drink or talk loud on the bus. etc.
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Old 12-28-2012, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Vladivostok, Russia
122 posts, read 140,591 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GreyKarast View Post
Ekaterina. Not a common variant? In Russia very popular option is the full name. diminutive of Katya.
Grey, I know what names we have. Rina is not a common variant of Ekaterina.

Quote:
we even had a princess Ekaterina2
And Ekaterina I - also an empress, and also somewhat great. Ekaterinburg is called in her honor.
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Old 12-28-2012, 09:45 PM
 
Location: State Fire and Ice
3,079 posts, read 4,333,206 times
Reputation: 824
Quote:
Originally Posted by object704 View Post
Grey, I know what names we have. Rina is not a common variant of Ekaterina.


And Ekaterina I - also an empress, and also somewhat great. Ekaterinburg is called in her honor.
Yes you are right! I myself have even confused
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Old 12-28-2012, 09:58 PM
 
Location: State Fire and Ice
3,079 posts, read 4,333,206 times
Reputation: 824
Quote:
Originally Posted by eskercurve View Post
Hmmm ... Spanish is obvious as it opens many doors to business and travel throughout the Latin American world...

So let's try Japanese.

  1. If you decide to go into business or take a job there, you'll get an inside look into the goings-on and life there. People will be thrilled you know a basic level of understanding of the language.
  2. Meanwhile, travel through the country is easy. Most cities and even small towns have English printed with it so you know exactly where you are, and the maps on ticket machines and even some (a few LOL!) folks speak english.
  3. Japan is an interesting country with a unique history. They've also gone to great lengths to preserve facets of their society from bygone eras, to the point where even some ancient villages still use straw thatch roofs and old style rice paddies with old style tools, yet their family members have a variety of jobs, the bus stop is closeby, they have satellite TV, and there's a drinks machine a block down the road. I think the history is the biggest selling point, personally.
  4. It's a good segway into Asia. They've blended modern Western living with their culture quite effectively. Whereas each town and city has a plethora of history behind it, you can also get lost in the modern. If you're used to big-dirty-city then this may not be for you but it's still cool.
  5. Speaking of modern culture, if you're into anime at all, or are just curious, you can try going to Tokyo, Akihabara specifically, and see what all the fuss is about. While you're there, go shopping for electronics.
  6. The hot springs. While bathing naked with the same gender has gone out of fashion in the West, it's still very much alive here and it's one of those "When in Rome" things that you have to try. Don't be a prude! Yunnessun is a great resort.
  7. If you learn Japanese you de facto could probably get by, with a little help, in China, as Kanji is used by both Chinese and Japanese to represent many of the same things. Be careful though, the phonetics are different!
  8. It's a great way to brush up on your manners. Don't eat or drink or talk loud on the bus. etc.
It is interesting that the suchi in Russia, even more popular than in Japan. The reason for maintaining the Japanese way of life,(Many years) is the duty of a vacuum across the country. Sometimes I wish the Japanese, on the one hand it is the courage of war and the other sailors as cowardice. For this reason, Japan now consists of only four major and many smaller islands. Japanese language is not so much of the image as many may seem at first sight and is quite easy to learn. Although the Japanese think that their language is the most difficult to study. Their writing takes from Chinese, Juno little defer type. Japanese good entrepreneurs that can do them justice.
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