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View Poll Results: Financial Capital of the World?
London 80 36.20%
New York 141 63.80%
Voters: 221. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-24-2016, 03:30 AM
 
Location: Great Britain
8,646 posts, read 2,922,513 times
Reputation: 5171

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Quote:
Originally Posted by joeyg2014
It's not trendsetting if the world doesn't care about it. NY doesn't just win, it beats the dog **** out of London when it comes to trendsetting. In fact, London lost so bad they forfeited. That's why so many of them are wearing NY caps now.

Trendsetting is generally described as leading the way in fashion and ideas.

So you honestly believe London and the UK have very little to contribute in terms of fashion and ideas and that Memphis and NYC have more to contribute.

Do you also think other countries outside of the US aren't trendsetting, or do you think most ideas and fashion just comes from the US and cities such as Memphis and NYC.

I wouldn't claim that London or indeed the UK have a monopoly on ideas or fashion, indeed there is a lot of global input, with regions such as the Far East becoming ever more influential.

Britain has taken ideas from across the world and London is a global city, with people representing a multitude of cultures, ideas and indeed fashions.

Whilst I have nothing againt Memphis or country music, I don't instantly think Memphis as being some global centre for ideas and fashion. NYC is obviously a major city, but there are other cities in the world that are influential and that create fashions and have ideas.

In terms of wearing items, I bet a lot more people around the world wear the shirts of English Premier League football teams than wear NYC caps. As for the Football Shirts and NYC Caps, I bet both are manufactured in China.

The world's most watched league




Last edited by Brave New World; 04-24-2016 at 04:48 AM..
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Old 04-24-2016, 05:35 AM
 
1,228 posts, read 899,285 times
Reputation: 921
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brave New World View Post
Trendsetting is generally described as leading the way in fashion and ideas.

So you honestly believe London and the UK have very little to contribute in terms of fashion and ideas and that Memphis and NYC have more to contribute.
NY does. It's not even a debate. I could name many more smaller US cities that contribute more to modern popular culture than the entire UK.


You might've forgotten about Elvis and BB King learning their craft in Memphis or that crunk the most popular form of hip hop in the 2000s began in Memphis.



Quote:
Do you also think other countries outside of the US aren't trendsetting, or do you think most ideas and fashion just comes from the US and cities such as Memphis and NYC.

I wouldn't claim that London or indeed the UK have a monopoly on ideas or fashion, indeed there is a lot of global input, with regions such as the Far East becoming ever more influential.
You couldn't claim the UK had a monopoly on ideas or fashion. It's so blatantly obvious the UK doesn't it would make no sense for someone to say that.

Quote:
Britain has taken ideas from across the world and London is a global city, with people representing a multitude of cultures, ideas and indeed fashions.
The UK is too busy following American trends to start trends.

Quote:
Whilst I have nothing againt Memphis or country music, I don't instantly think Memphis as being some global centre for ideas and fashion. NYC is obviously a major city, but there are other cities in the world that are influential and that create fashions and have ideas.
I genuinely believe that Memphis has contributed more to modern popular culture than any foreign city.

Quote:
In terms of wearing items, I bet a lot more people around the world wear the shirts of English Premier League football teams than wear NYC caps. As for the Football Shirts and NYC Caps, I bet both are manufactured in China.
I think baseball hats are more culturally significant than English soccer shirts. In all honestly, I think grown men wearing jerseys is a little strange. A lot of Americans outgrow wearing jerseys before they're adults. Especially ones with another man's name on their back. This can be forgiven attending a game though, or if it's part of a fashion combination. It has to look right to be pulled off.

China's economy heavily relies on Americans. So many Chinese people can't even afford to buy the cheap things they manufacture.

Last edited by joeyg2014; 04-24-2016 at 05:57 AM..
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Old 04-24-2016, 06:04 AM
 
Location: Great Britain
8,646 posts, read 2,922,513 times
Reputation: 5171
Quote:
Originally Posted by joeyg2014 View Post
NY does. It's not even a debate. I could name many more smaller US cities that contribute more to modern popular culture than the entire UK.


You might've forgotten about Elvis and BB King learning their craft in Memphis or that crunk the most popular form of hip hop in the 2000s began in Memphis.





You couldn't claim the UK had a monopoly on ideas or fashion. It's so blatantly obvious the UK doesn't it would make no sense for someone to say that.



The UK is too busy following American trends to start trends.



I genuinely believe that Memphis has contributed more to modern popular culture than any foreign city.



I think baseball hats are more culturally significant than English soccer shirts. In all honestly, I think grown men wearing jerseys is a little strange. A lot of Americans outgrow wearing jerseys before they're adults. Especially ones with another man's name on their back. This can be forgiven attending a game though, or if it's part of a fashion combination. It has to look right to be pulled off.

China's economy heavily relies on Americans. So many Chinese people can't even afford to buy the cheap things they manufacture.
ROFL - Please just stop.

In other news US Magazine Forbes recently ranked London as the most influential city in the world.

Quote:
Originally Posted by US Forbes Magazine

According to the study, London attracted more than double the amount of foreign direct investment (FDI) deals than New York, and now houses a significant amount of corporate headquarters.

The report added that London's appeal and influence was also helped by facilities that make it easy for people to travel to other global cities.

"London is not only the historic capital of the English language, which contributes to its status as a powerful media hub and major advertising centre, but it's also the birthplace of the cultural, legal and business practices that define global capitalism," said Joel Kotkin, author of the study and contributor to Forbes.

"Beyond these traditional strengths, London has become Europe's top technology start-up centre, according to the Startup Genome project. The city has upward of 3,000 tech startups, as well as Google's largest office outside Silicon Valley.

"Compared to New York, it is also time-zone advantaged for doing business in Asia, and has the second best global air connections of any city after Dubai, with nonstop flights at least three times week to 89% of global cities outside of its home region of Europe."

Forbes: London Most Influential City In the World

Last edited by Brave New World; 04-24-2016 at 06:27 AM..
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Old 04-24-2016, 07:36 AM
 
1,270 posts, read 859,682 times
Reputation: 1407
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brave New World View Post
ROFL - Please just stop.
Indeed, it's somewhat laughable that someone would dismiss a city which has given the world such groundbreaking artists as The Rolling Stones, The Who, The Kinks, Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, Queen, David Bowie, T-Rex, The Sex Pistols, The Clash, Siousxie and The Banshees, The Jam, Kate Bush, Suede, Blur etc - as not setting any trends. And this is just London! I could easily extend it to include Liverpool and Manchester if he wants to include Memphis. Like it or not, the UK punches well above its weight in this area. We could also add other art forms (Cinema, TV, Art and Fashion) which London also does extremely well.

This is not, of course, to marginalise the cultural contribution of NYC or the US as a whole which is obviously immense. You can keep baseball caps though
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Old 04-24-2016, 07:57 AM
 
1,204 posts, read 715,587 times
Reputation: 739
The idea that New York is indisputable cultural trendsetter is one of those insular New York-isms that no-one really takes seriously outside of the USA, and it's one of those things that give Americans such a bad reputation.

It may seem to be the case that the world revolves around New York if you live in parts of the East Coast, or if your idea of culture is stunted to include only those things that stem from NYC, but those delusions crumble quickly once you broaden your horizons.
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Old 04-24-2016, 08:13 AM
 
3,431 posts, read 2,757,546 times
Reputation: 4111
Quote:
Originally Posted by joeyg2014 View Post
The US had a relatively even ratio of imports to exports in the early 1900s.

As foreign markets grew, consumers apparently had a greater preference for American over British
products. This could be due to dissimilar product mix in the characteristics, quality, or delivery
aspects of the products, or to other factors.

http://www.dartmouth.edu/~dirwin/docs/Surge3wp.pdf
Wow, misleading bunk--That paper addresses U.S. exports of only two products and two products only, steel and iron--and mainly to two markets only, Canada and Mexico. The U.S. was a longgg way from dominating the world's economy at that point. It was essentially very insular until well after WW2.

Quote:
Originally Posted by joeyg2014 View Post
America made it mainstream worldwide which is the point. I don't care what the UK did in commonwealth countries.
Pretty far from it. U.S. cultural exports weren't much of a factor at all, until Hollywood films became a thing... and it was a long time before they became globally dominant (I'm thinking world distribution improved after WW2)... the first global Hollywood star was Charlie Chaplin, who wasn't even American. (Nor did he speak English in most of his films, now that I think of it, so maybe not so relevant.) Louis B. Mayer wasn't born nor raised in the U.S.... I could go on. I'm sure you claim Mel Gibson as one of your own too.


Quote:
Originally Posted by joeyg2014 View Post
The fact that Canada shows Shania Twain and Celine Dion in the top 5 says it all. They will support their own just because, but the fact doesn't change that American artists can go anywhere and sell out to crowds full of "pseudo Americans" effortlessly. Besides that point, Celine Dion and Shania Twain perform American genres because they were influenced by American culture.
The U.S. has pop culture influence, I certainly won't deny that. It's waning though. The record sales stats prove it. Musicians from other countries are beating the pants off American imports on their home turf.

Shania Twain's pretty mainstream U.S. Nashville, yep. But Celine Dion's French albums have a different style, with a lot of affinity for trends from France and francophone countries... Dion has the world's top-selling French-language album, which is sort of irrelevant to this discussion, except to indicate some of the U.S. ignorance of what happens across the border, never mind across oceans.

There's a lot of global trade that has little to do with U.S. trends. The U.S. is dominant in the world, but not as universally as you think.
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Old 04-24-2016, 08:14 AM
 
3,431 posts, read 2,757,546 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hightower72 View Post
The idea that New York is indisputable cultural trendsetter is one of those insular New York-isms that no-one really takes seriously outside of the USA, and it's one of those things that give Americans such a bad reputation.

It may seem to be the case that the world revolves around New York if you live in parts of the East Coast, or if your idea of culture is stunted to include only those things that stem from NYC, but those delusions crumble quickly once you broaden your horizons.
Someone growing up in rural Ohio obviously isn't going to know a whole lot about other countries. But New Yawkers who are supposed to be a bit more cosmopolitan, there's not much else you can say about that attitude except to call it what it is, cultural chauvinism. Hence Trump I guess.
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Old 04-24-2016, 08:56 AM
 
1,204 posts, read 715,587 times
Reputation: 739
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa2011 View Post
Someone growing up in rural Ohio obviously isn't going to know a whole lot about other countries. But New Yawkers who are supposed to be a bit more cosmopolitan, there's not much else you can say about that attitude except to call it what it is, cultural chauvinism. Hence Trump I guess.
Some cultures are better than others. That is self-evidently true, so if that is what Trump represents, then I agree with him. I'm not supporting some kind of cultural relativism, instead the idea that there are far better cultures out there in the world than faddy millennial trends in New York.

Whatever the case, I'm unsure why we are talking about culture in a thread that concerns finance.
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Old 04-24-2016, 02:03 PM
 
3,431 posts, read 2,757,546 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hightower72 View Post
Some cultures are better than others. That is self-evidently true, so if that is what Trump represents, then I agree with him. I'm not supporting some kind of cultural relativism, instead the idea that there are far better cultures out there in the world than faddy millennial trends in New York.

Whatever the case, I'm unsure why we are talking about culture in a thread that concerns finance.
As someone who doesn't work in finance, this is an interesting question to me--does cultural hegemony lead to financial/economic hegemony? Or are they actually unconnected?

There's a relationship, somewhat--cultural products are often commercial products, after all. And they might build goodwill in foreign markets that will make them more amenable to buying into broader economic products (e.g., if you like James Dean and Elvis, then you'll like Levi's jeans and Coca Cola too!)... but are culture and economics really dependent upon one another? Do they work in tandem? Or not?

Maybe I'm off on a crazy tangent. It seems like an interesting question to me, nonetheless.
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Old 04-24-2016, 02:30 PM
 
1,204 posts, read 715,587 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa2011 View Post
As someone who doesn't work in finance, this is an interesting question to me--does cultural hegemony lead to financial/economic hegemony? Or are they actually unconnected?
Cultural capital Intellectual capitalEconomic activityFinancial operations
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