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Old 01-08-2013, 06:17 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hombre View Post
Yeah, you're probably right.

Another thing I notice is that many American words have crept into our English. I put that down to the influence of American television being far more accessible than it was 30 years ago.

Immigration has also had a major influence on our accents, with millions of immigrants arriving since the 1960's from India, Pakistan, the West Indies and more recently, Eastern Europe.
I've also word English words such as 'loo' are creeping into American speech as well! Words are different from accents of course, but like accents are a component of 'dialect'.
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Old 01-08-2013, 06:37 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Originally Posted by sulkiercupid View Post
Other than the increasing number of Americanism's Oz English doesn't really sound less Australian. It's essentially still a mix of the various regional dialects of the British Isles.
What? It doesn't resemble northern English or Scottish accents in the slightest. It's pretty much an amalgam of old Cockney and a bit of Irish.
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Old 01-08-2013, 08:04 PM
 
Location: Aventura FL
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Originally Posted by belmont22 View Post
I've also word English words such as 'loo' are creeping into American speech as well! Words are different from accents of course, but like accents are a component of 'dialect'.
I don't disagree, but American English has influenced Britain far more. I even catch friends of mine back home using the term "bro". Every time I go home, I notice more Americanisms creeping into the British English language. What's happening in the UK is that accents specific to urban areas are spreading, so now there is a generic southeast accent and it's getting to the point where there's a generic Northern Irish accent, which as another poster pointed out is the spread of the Belfast accent.
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Old 01-08-2013, 08:10 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hombre View Post
I don't disagree, but American English has influenced Britain far more. I even catch friends of mine back home using the term "bro". Every time I go home, I notice more Americanisms creeping into the British English language. What's happening in the UK is that accents specific to urban areas are spreading, so now there is a generic southeast accent and it's getting to the point where there's a generic Northern Irish accent, which as another poster pointed out is the spread of the Belfast accent.
And I thought they were holding up better against Americanisms there. I cringe whenever I hear a young person say 'dude' here.
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Old 01-08-2013, 08:12 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
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Originally Posted by belmont22 View Post

The Southern American dialect seems to be turning into a non-regional 'country' accent throughout the United States and increasingly no longer signifies that a person is from the southeastern US. In fact many people who display Rebel flags live in far-off states such as Oregon, Ohio and New Hampshire, so I think the southern accent is ultimately connected to a culture that is rural at heart. Young southern liberals seem ashamed of their accents and many imitate the West Coast type accent to signify their beliefs and viewpoints.
Actually, that's pretty much how it always has been. The southern accent, research shows, was actually a made up one from people on the losing side of the American Civil War. After a little bit it was passed down and is now a legit accent.
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Old 01-08-2013, 08:17 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
Actually, that's pretty much how it always has been. The southern accent, research shows, was actually a made up one from people on the losing side of the American Civil War. After a little bit it was passed down and is now a legit accent.
What do you mean 'made up'? All accents are made up by people, but develop over time... what are you trying to say?
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Old 01-08-2013, 08:20 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
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Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
What do you mean 'made up'? All accents are made up by people, but develop over time... what are you trying to say?
Some people on the confederate side wanted to have a way of separating themselves from the Union side after they lost (or maybe during the Civil War) and they "made up" the accent. It did not evolve from immigrants like other accents have. This is at least according to a program on the History Channel last year.
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Old 01-08-2013, 08:55 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 43,224,926 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
Some people on the confederate side wanted to have a way of separating themselves from the Union side after they lost (or maybe during the Civil War) and they "made up" the accent. It did not evolve from immigrants like other accents have. This is at least according to a program on the History Channel last year.
Balderdash lol...Do some research on the Southern accent. Or rather, Southern accents.
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Old 01-08-2013, 09:04 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Balderdash lol...Do some research on the Southern accent. Or rather, Southern accents.
I'd have to believe both camps...I am sure some of it came from the English, but I bet there was some conscious effort to make it more in the forefront as the programme mentioned.
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Old 01-08-2013, 09:18 PM
 
Location: Aventura FL
868 posts, read 931,163 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
And I thought they were holding up better against Americanisms there. I cringe whenever I hear a young person say 'dude' here.
Haha, "dude" has been ingrained in modern post-Cholmondley-Warner Britain for quite some time! You'd be surprised how many American English words have become common in Britain. It shocks me every time I go back.
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