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Old 01-08-2013, 06:57 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 43,144,896 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabio SBA View Post
I would not say more "musical", but German is the best language for writting music, even better than Italian. Chinese is the worst.
Always wondered how they sung with their tonal language.
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Old 01-08-2013, 07:09 AM
 
950 posts, read 1,457,094 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabio SBA View Post
I would not say more "musical", but German is the best language for writting music, even better than Italian. Chinese is the worst.
Can't agree more there. Let alone writing music, I've never even heard of someone freestyling in any form of Chinese
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Old 01-08-2013, 07:59 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,668 posts, read 71,556,197 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Always wondered how they sung with their tonal language.
It's extremely difficult. My Mandarin Prof did his doctoral thesis by translating traditional Christmas carols into Mandarin. Each syllable in Mandarin can have many meanings, distinguished by the tonality of the syllable, so every note of the music is restricted to the limited class of words that have that tone. Cantonese is even more restrictive, with seven tones, while Mandarin has only four.

Conversely, when composing original music in Chinese, it is basically writing poetry, and then letting the musicality of the words dictate the melody. If a song is written in Mandarin, it cannot be sung in Cantonese, even though the characters for the lyrics on the sheet music are the same.
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Old 01-08-2013, 08:16 AM
 
Location: São Paulo, Brazil
1,484 posts, read 1,645,493 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Always wondered how they sung with their tonal language.
This is the reason: tonal language. The same happens with Thai. The melody must be written very carefully in order to not prejudice the meaning of the word. I don't speak chinese, but I have a friend from Chongqing; she said it's very hard even to explain how a music in chinese can exist.
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Old 01-08-2013, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
3,067 posts, read 3,363,892 times
Reputation: 2133
Quote:
Originally Posted by MalaMan View Post
Brazilian Portuguese is very musical...
Yes I agree, Brazilian Portuguese has a very nice melody to it. The Romantic languages in general sound quite musical to my ear.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabio SBA
German is the best language for writting music
Provided it's not a native German speaker singing it.
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Old 01-08-2013, 10:43 AM
 
Location: São Paulo, Brazil
1,484 posts, read 1,645,493 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sulkiercupid View Post
Yes I agree, Brazilian Portuguese has a very nice melody to it. The Romantic languages in general sound quite musical to my ear.



Provided it's not a native German speaker singing it.
Depends on the region from which the speaker comes... the German language has areputation to be "guttural", but there are many accents within the country. The accents from Austria and southern Germany sound fine, I think. Germans in general dislike the accent from Saxony.
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Old 01-08-2013, 12:00 PM
 
2,818 posts, read 5,154,973 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Operas are best sung in Italian, because of the purity of the vowel sounds, without diphthongs.
I'm sorry to tell you there are indeed diphthongs in Italian. I don't not where you got that notion from.
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Old 01-08-2013, 01:00 PM
 
Location: In a Galaxy far, far away called Germany
4,266 posts, read 3,593,985 times
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I cast my vote for Italian.
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Old 01-08-2013, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Travelling the world
84 posts, read 167,894 times
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Spanish or Italian, both!! but I can't say which one is more... difficult to pick one.
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Old 01-08-2013, 03:43 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,668 posts, read 71,556,197 times
Reputation: 35864
Quote:
Originally Posted by sulkiercupid View Post
Yes I agree, Brazilian Portuguese has a very nice melody to it. The Romantic languages in general sound quite musical to my ear.



Provided it's not a native German speaker singing it.
You mean it's better if its Swiss?
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