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View Poll Results: You top pick? (multiple choice this time-- for those that like a few of the places)
New York 56 28.72%
London 50 25.64%
Hong Kong 36 18.46%
Tokyo 25 12.82%
Paris 28 14.36%
Voters: 195. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 06-27-2018, 10:55 AM
 
3,671 posts, read 2,862,125 times
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As a general trend though, the waters around London are cooler than those of NYC : )

That said, I think the scenery of the coastline near London tops that of NYC, and actually is prettier than most coastlines so close to a city anywhere in the world. The White Cliffs of Dover would be one of the more rugged and picturesque spots on the American west coast, and it's an easy day trip from London. I've also heard excellent things about Brighton as a beach town destination of late, though I'm not sure how it compares to the beach towns surrounding NYC.

London isn't exactly known as a hot bed for natural scenery, but I'd say when comparing it against all the 30 or so metros of a significant size that aren't in the western US on topography, coastal features/proximity, layout/green spaces, etc, London might have all of them beat as a whole package. Tokyo probably only answers to a handful of cities in the world on the natural scenery surrounding it, the only cities in the US I think in it's league would be like Seattle, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, Honolulu.. Nagano a 2 hour train ride and Kamakura a 1 hour train ride plus numerous outstanding gardens and parks within the city, pretty tough combination.
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Old 06-27-2018, 06:05 PM
 
Location: In the heights
21,635 posts, read 23,087,980 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brave New World View Post
LOL - it's currently nearly 90f in many parts of the UK.

You can just get on a train and be at the beach within an hour from London.

10 best beaches near London to visit this weekend | Time Out
All true, but I’m not sure why you’re quoting my post
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Old 07-09-2018, 05:35 AM
 
7 posts, read 2,480 times
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Hong Kong is the only city that doesn't freeze among the cities listed in the topic.

Hiking is still possible and without sweat in winter but people don't swim at beaches.

Can both hike and swim in summer but with sweating and very sunny.

People stay indoor more in winter in HK.

It can be 0 to 10 degrees. Most HK homes don't have warm air conditioning in winter.
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Old 09-15-2018, 09:10 AM
 
1,398 posts, read 440,815 times
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FYI, Hong Kong is very run down, unplanned, and polluted. The air quality is almost as bad as Beijing or Mexico City. The traffic is horrible and could rival Los Angeles.

Other than that, Hong Kong has some neat stuff, but nothing you couldn't get in Singapore, which is as neat, well planned, and green as Tokyo.
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Old 03-26-2019, 07:46 PM
 
Location: Thailand
7 posts, read 2,978 times
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My vote goes for Hong Kong. I can't stand NYC, been there like 6 times. Poorly managed and falling apart. Heroin addicts on every corner. Crime everywhere. Not a very safe place.

Hong Kong is safer, cleaner, and much more modern.

I also love Hong Kong's topography. NYC is flat, flat flat. Hong Kong has hills, mountains, valleys, and tons of GREEN in the surrounding areas, unlike New York's swathes of grey neighborhoods.

I'm also scratching my head wondering why Paris is even on this list? I've been there, too. I can think of a hundred cities more deserving.
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Old 03-26-2019, 09:21 PM
 
Location: Alexandria, Commonwealth of Virginia
1,558 posts, read 1,041,970 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ketobeast View Post
My vote goes for Hong Kong. I can't stand NYC, been there like 6 times. Poorly managed and falling apart. Heroin addicts on every corner. Crime everywhere. Not a very safe place.

Hong Kong is safer, cleaner, and much more modern.

I also love Hong Kong's topography. NYC is flat, flat flat. Hong Kong has hills, mountains, valleys, and tons of GREEN in the surrounding areas, unlike New York's swathes of grey neighborhoods.

I'm also scratching my head wondering why Paris is even on this list? I've been there, too. I can think of a hundred cities more deserving.
So many wrong takes.

New York is not "falling apart." It's undergoing a renaissance right now and is nearly a decade into its biggest construction boom. The city hasn't looked better in the past 80 years.

"Crime everywhere" is laughable. It's an extremely safe city and puts all other American cities to shame.

Hong Kong is safer, cleaner but definitely not "more modern." Walk around Hong Kong and closely look at the buildings. The majority are 70s/80s commie blocks that are extremely low quality and third world in appearance. New York's old skyscrapers, on the other hand, are timeless in quality and build. And both cities have tons of generic corporates, so I don't see what makes Hong Kong more "modern" in your view. Hong Kong, if anything, looks stuck in the 90s.

NYC is flat? Here's a picture of New York from Bear Mountain:


Hazy Manhattan Skyline 35 miles away as the crow flies by 亨利, on Flickr
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Old 03-27-2019, 02:16 AM
 
167 posts, read 67,909 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by manitopiaaa View Post
So many wrong takes.

New York is not "falling apart." It's undergoing a renaissance right now and is nearly a decade into its biggest construction boom. The city hasn't looked better in the past 80 years.

"Crime everywhere" is laughable. It's an extremely safe city and puts all other American cities to shame.

Hong Kong is safer, cleaner but definitely not "more modern." Walk around Hong Kong and closely look at the buildings. The majority are 70s/80s commie blocks that are extremely low quality and third world in appearance. New York's old skyscrapers, on the other hand, are timeless in quality and build. And both cities have tons of generic corporates, so I don't see what makes Hong Kong more "modern" in your view. Hong Kong, if anything, looks stuck in the 90s.

NYC is flat? Here's a picture of New York from Bear Mountain:


Hazy Manhattan Skyline 35 miles away as the crow flies by 亨利, on Flickr
I was in NYC two times last year and the infrastructure is crumbling. jFK is such a terrible airport, the subway is falling apart, So many streets even in Manhattan are dirty with those horrible trash bags, roaches everywhere. I have felt unsafe in certain areas too, definitely overarrared in my opinion but it’s a fun city.
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Old 03-27-2019, 05:31 AM
 
Location: Near Luxembourg
1,782 posts, read 858,098 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ketobeast View Post
My vote goes for Hong Kong. I can't stand NYC, been there like 6 times. Poorly managed and falling apart. Heroin addicts on every corner. Crime everywhere. Not a very safe place.

Hong Kong is safer, cleaner, and much more modern.

I also love Hong Kong's topography. NYC is flat, flat flat. Hong Kong has hills, mountains, valleys, and tons of GREEN in the surrounding areas, unlike New York's swathes of grey neighborhoods.

I'm also scratching my head wondering why Paris is even on this list? I've been there, too. I can think of a hundred cities more deserving.
Happens a lot to tourists. It's not only a radio station and ridiculous pins sold everywhere... It's also 12.2 million people that work there. Its entire region -unkown by nearly all tourists- is called the Ile de France, or Paris region, a GDP of 799B$ (2017), 65 000$ per head.
The metropole du Grand Paris, -the core- has 7.2 M inhabitans, a density of 8.6K inhabitans/km2 (for reference, inner London = 10K) and a surface of 816km2. Its GDP is 599B$, 83 000$ per head (not PPP tho) unfortunately with huge disparities , that's a big meh.
92000$ per head in 2015 inside the "tourists Paris". Again with huge differences especially west/north.

Anyway I chose Luxemburg, for London/Paris wages, and green and real appartments on the french side, still covered by all advantages that France offers. Vosges moutain range for week ends. I m a kind of parasite.
Unfortunately, Luxemburg isn't in the ranking.

Last edited by Pokitobounto; 03-27-2019 at 05:50 AM..
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Old 03-27-2019, 06:36 AM
 
Location: Great Britain
10,692 posts, read 3,646,563 times
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According to density and livability, two cities rank above others accordng to research, London and Singapore.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CityLab

Just two cities — London and Singapore — fall into the win-win quadrant of high density and high livability. There are two more which straddle the line — Hong Kong (which hugs the Y-axis of the win-win quadrant) and Tokyo (which hugs the X-axis of that same quadrant).

Density vs. Livability in the World's Biggest Cities - CityLab

In terms of London it has a lot of greenspace that helps break up the density, and Singapore is also known for it's emphasis on the environment and greenery.

Most European cities do have a lot of green spaces, and Paris also has some notable green spaces, as does Berlin, Madrid and numerous other major European cities.

London has a history of green spaces going back as far as the Tudor Kings such as Henry VIII and the Deer Parks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Nature of Cities

This movement is not something that has suddenly emerged out of the blue. London has a long and impressive history of protecting its green environment, from the Royal Parks created in the late medieval and Tudor periods, to the Metropolitan gardens movement of the 19th century and Garden City suburbs of the early 20th century, to the designation of London’s Green Belt and Metropolitan Open Land in the 1950s and the massive proliferation of urban nature reserves since the 1980s, large numbers of which are now protected through planning legislation. The idea of a National Park City is building on firm foundations.

The statistics are extraordinary. Greater London covers nearly 1600 km2, of which 47 percent is physically green. Nearly 20 percent is made up of private gardens and there are 3,000 parks. The total length of streams, rivers and canals is more than 850km, many of which are accessible by footpaths. Signed footpaths and well established greenways exceed 1000km in length.

London’s natural habitats are exceptional, with considerable areas of ancient woodland, meadows, heath and common, as well as ancient deer parks—such as Richmond Park—and recently created wetlands that have proved to be extremely popular. These natural habitats include some that are internationally important, but it is particularly striking that the total amount of natural habitat now protected by nature conservation designations amounts to nearly 20 percent of Greater London.


The Nature of Cities - London: A National Park City

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Old 03-27-2019, 07:12 AM
 
Location: Near Luxembourg
1,782 posts, read 858,098 times
Reputation: 1157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brave New World View Post
According to density and livability, two cities rank above others accordng to research, London and Singapore.



In terms of London it has a lot of greenspace that helps break up the density, and Singapore is also known for it's emphasis on the environment and greenery.

Most European cities do have a lot of green spaces, and Paris also has some notable green spaces, as does Berlin, Madrid and numerous other major European cities.

London has a history of green spaces going back as far as the Tudor Kings such as Henry VIII and the Deer Parks.
Paris isn't green at all in some parts... Like, not at all at all . Not even geranium on balconies
In the core of the 10th district of Paris, IMO the least green (well, not green at all to be simple) it gives this:
https://www.google.com/maps/@48.8721...7i16384!8i8192
One brave tree still in the 10th distric:
https://www.google.com/maps/@48.8751...7i16384!8i8192

I cant' stand it in July or August.

The counterpart of this horrible density is that real big forests are then quite close to the city since it's compact.
Saint germain en Laye's Forest, Sénart, Sucy en Brie, Meudon, Armainvilliers...
If you have a car -or train if you are ok with 50 minutes one way - many parisians spend a day there (saturday usually): you can puch to Fontainebleau (250km2), Rambouillet (200km2) or even Ermonville. I did it in Fontainebleau few times and the castle is nice. Had my car, it helped to forget Paris and the noisy metro in the middle of real forests...
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