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View Poll Results: Mexico City or Madrid?
Mexico City 28 41.18%
Madrid 40 58.82%
Voters: 68. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-24-2018, 12:33 AM
 
Location: Vancouver, BC
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I have only been to Mexico City and not Madrid yet but here is what I think based on what I read/seen:

Architecture - Madrid but Mexico City has some cool buildings too.
Entertainment/Nightlife - No idea. Probably Madrid because its more compact.
Public transit: Madrid for sure.
Climate: Mexico City by far
Food: Mexico City - LOVE authentic Mexican food and they seem to have a lot of variety. Spanish food is good too though
Safety/Crime: Madrid by far
Scenery: Mexico City with mountains all around.
Economy: Madrid for sure.
Overall choice: Madrid to live and Mexico City to take a vacation.
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Old 05-24-2018, 07:23 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yihey View Post
Ok.
There a Roman aqueducts that are more than 2,000 years old just outside Madrid.
You keep carrying on about most of Madrid's buildings being from the 28th and 29 th century.
How do I say it.
La Latina and Lavapiés are full of buildings from the 15th and 16th century.
That's very much central Madrid..
Plaza Mayor one of the main plazas in Madrid was built nearly 500 years ago.
Plaza de la Villa and surrounding buildings are at least 500-600 years old.
I agree Madrid itself is young by European standards.
But many surrounding cities which are virtual dormitory suburbs of Madrid these days are thousands of years old

There is nothing in Mexico that can compare..
If there are whole cities full of buildings ,aqueducts and bridges.
I mean entire cities not just a few relics like there is outside Madrid.
Please let me know.
I'm currently visiting Australia.
Yes the ancient Aboriginal civilizations have been in this country for many thousands of years.
The only reminders are alot of cave paintings.
And Madrid was founded in the 9th century.
Just outside the Almudena cathedral there's the parque de Atenas which contains some very old Moorish walls of the city that are 1,200 years old.
And yes Mexico City is huge compared to Madrid.
But size isn't always everything.
Madrid metro is considerably larger than Mexico cities to put one example.

La Latina occupies the site of the oldest section of Madrid but it is NOT composed mostly of 15th and 16th century buildings as you believe it to be.

What you see today are mostly nineteenth century buildings built over the ancient plots - thus preserving the medieval layout of narrow and winding streets with large plazas. :S

Most of Madrid is fairly young and the historic constructions we see today are no more grand than the engineering feats of the pre columbian cities of central Mexico.

To add to the layer of pre columbian history in the Valley of Mexico (which has been the location for one of the largest concentrations of humanity for over 1000 years) you have an over lay of colonial architecture, along with late 19th/early 20th century architecture of the Porfiriato, neighborhoods of moderne style residences from the interwar period, neighborhoods of fantastic of mid century modernism (jardines del pedregal and UNAM), and enormous new districts of contemporary architecture (Santa Fe and Interlomas).

Outside CDMX are the historic towns of central Mexico (e.g. Puebla, Cholula, Oaxaca, Guanajuato, and Zacatecas). These cities were all established nearly 500 years ago and a significant amount of their building stock in their respective historic centers are also centuries old. Guanajuato and Zacatecas have fantastic architecture because of the wealth generated by the silver veins that were discovered in the region.
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Old 05-26-2018, 02:29 AM
 
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I’ll take Mexico City at this point as I don’t believe I’ve been to a city that has such a diversity
Of offerings:

1. 3.4 sq Mi historic center spanning 3 eras and 800 years. (5x French Quarter)
2. One of the world’s most beautiful avenues flanked by foliage, sculpture, and endless stream of modern high rises, businesses, architecture, shopping centers, fully indicative of a modern city that ranks among one of the regions/world’s most politically/culturally/economically influential. (Reforma/Cuauhtemoc in general)
3. Multi national business hub sprawling out of the city with additional sophistication and futuristic design projects (Santa Fe)
4. Perhaps the most major city in the world where Indigenous culture plays such a significant role. Massive pyramids among largest on earth and more archaeological sites than almost any other major city/region in the world.
5. Unique/Distinctive cultural tradition and atmosphere. Centerpiece for food culture that is one of few recognized as a heritage by UNESCO, and generally cool traditions. Perhaps more cathedrals, markets, bakeries than any city I have ever been (including all over Europe) Floating markets in canals. Mariachi bands, Lucha libre , yada yada.
6. 15K of topographical variation within 50 miles, bearing out just about any city on earth. Alpine, tropical, arid and deciduous cegetation all widely visible. One of the world’s most seismically active regions.
7. Stunning towns in surrounding region built into hillsides that could rival beauty of just about any “Old City” in the world. Some even present within the city.
8. General place of significance, entertainment and event hub. If the city doesn’t have it. It is working on getting it, or it simply may not exist. That said, also a place where 3rd world poverty can be visible in a number of parts. Many people striving to find their way here from all walks of life.

Really like 8 cities in one. That said, Madrid is also on my list and looks super cool.
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Old 05-26-2018, 05:52 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sf_arkitect View Post
La Latina occupies the site of the oldest section of Madrid but it is NOT composed mostly of 15th and 16th century buildings as you believe it to be.

What you see today are mostly nineteenth century buildings built over the ancient plots - thus preserving the medieval layout of narrow and winding streets with large plazas. :S

Most of Madrid is fairly young and the historic constructions we see today are no more grand than the engineering feats of the pre columbian cities of central Mexico.

To add to the layer of pre columbian history in the Valley of Mexico (which has been the location for one of the largest concentrations of humanity for over 1000 years) you have an over lay of colonial architecture, along with late 19th/early 20th century architecture of the Porfiriato, neighborhoods of moderne style residences from the interwar period, neighborhoods of fantastic of mid century modernism (jardines del pedregal and UNAM), and enormous new districts of contemporary architecture (Santa Fe and Interlomas).

Outside CDMX are the historic towns of central Mexico (e.g. Puebla, Cholula, Oaxaca, Guanajuato, and Zacatecas). These cities were all established nearly 500 years ago and a significant amount of their building stock in their respective historic centers are also centuries old. Guanajuato and Zacatecas have fantastic architecture because of the wealth generated by the silver veins that were discovered in the region.
You don't seem to acknowledge the fact that Madrid is surrounded by cities that could virtually be considered dormitory towns that are not nearly 500 years old but more than 2,000 years old.
And you make it sound as if Madrid is basically a city from the 19th century.
I've already described areas that are 500 to 600 years old architecturally speaking. I.e plaza de la Villa and many of the surrounding buildings i.e the church of Nicolas de las servitas, church of San Pedro, plaza mayor, Puente de Segovia to name a few.
And while Mexico City does have a good size central area of Colonial architecture . In Madrid they were building European style edifices mainly baroque such as the very impressive royal palace which although built about 3 centuries ago give the impression of being much older.
I think it's great that Mexico is given full recognition of pre Columbian culture, architecture and customs.
But while Mexico itself has cities with streets of beautiful Colonial architecture.
Just outside Madrid there are many cities full of streets full of buildings that are more than a thousand years old or older.
Bridges and aqueducts that are more than 2,000 years old.
There is no way Mexico gives you the impression that it's as old as Europe.
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Old 05-26-2018, 06:12 AM
 
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I don’t know exactly how old the non aqueduct/etc areas are (1000 year old streetscape seem
Unlikely to me
Because even the most renowned old cities in Europe were generally formed around 1300-1400, at least in their present grid it seems. While I’m sure they are great, Guanajuato ar least would seem to match any in terms of sheer beauty and elaborateness of the architecture.
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Old 05-26-2018, 07:26 AM
 
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I'll have to check out Guanajuato.
Because there's no way the Mexico I saw gives the impression of being as ancient as the old European cities.
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Old 05-26-2018, 07:38 AM
 
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The cathedral of Salamanca for example was consecrated in the 12th century and completed in the 14th century.
There are many small towns and cities that built cathedrals centuries before that are surrounded by many buildings that are even older.
Toledo, Avila, Cuenca, Segovia to name a few small cities.
Hundreds of smaller towns.
There is no way on earth Mexico City looks anywhere near as ancient.
When you go to Europe it's the ancient landscapes and architecture that really stands out.
Not the skyscrapers as in Ciudad de México.
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Old 05-28-2018, 06:19 AM
 
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Yes, but that's an apples to oranges comparison, because this is Mexico City vs. Madrid. Yes, those places are nearby, but each of those is at least an hour from Madrid. If we are doing that, then you do have to consider some of the smaller towns surrounding Mexico City.


Here, for example, are some pictures of San Miguel de Allende:


https://traverse-blog.com/2016/04/29...llende-mexico/


Here are some of Guanajuato.


https://holeinthedonut.com/2010/05/0...eautiful-city/
Note: Toy around on Google and really navigate the streets there. These pics are okay but don't seem to really do it justice. For example, I have visited Tallinn and Dubrovnik, and while they are great, the pictures I've seen of this place seem to make it appear even more beautiful and compelling perhaps than those two.


Note the narrowness of the streets and how unbelievably pedestrian oriented it is. It would be basically impossible to drive a car through much of the city, so tunnels were built beneath the city, for cars to get around. You can even find mummies here, also. I've been to European Old Cities too, so I know what you are saying (their oldest are older), but honestly, that really doesn't necessarily define an "older" feel to me. Going around Notre Dame in Paris, just because it was finished in 1345. It's very nice and impressive, yes. But, much of what is around it has been updated, at least several times over the years. Guanajuato seems to give off less of that feel to me, at least from what I see in pictures. I badly want to make it there at some point.


Some other points I'll make.


1. You mention the aqueducts, theatres etc. from Roman times surrounding Madrid, that make it feel older, and yes, those are nice. But, those are just sites, and honestly, I don't feel they are any more connected to the present day city than say Templo Mayor complex in Mexico City. And, no ancient archaeological site in Spain holds even a candle to the greatness of Teotihuacan, along with numerous other complexes in Central Mexico. I don't know whether Central Mexico has more ancient sites, or Central Spain does (in terms of 1000 plus years), but what I do know is that almost unequivocally (Yes, the Segovia Aqueduct is really great), the ones in Mexico are more impressive to a visitors eyes.


2. "Age of a place" in terms of age of buildings is important, but is only really looking at one side of the whole picture. Perhaps more impressive in Mexico City, is that you see such a significant presence of what I guess I'd describe as Aztec culture. In no other city have I visited where I've felt such a, almost spiritual presence. From people praying to Tlaloc before a rain storm was coming in, getting a spiritual cleansing in the Zocalo, to all manner of expression and unique performance around the city, I don't believe there is another significant world city where indigenous culture has such a significant feel to it. Almost moving to goosebumps/tears how passionate locals are about ancient tradition, Christian faith (see: Passion Play Iztapalapa, the world's largest), and really even about hustling/going about their daily pursuits.


3. That bring to my last point, just the sense of "striving" that I see there creates just an unbelievable energy. In Mexico City, just north of town (I didn't even have time to get there, but there's a places called Plaza de las Tres Culturas. It features the Tlatelolco Ruin Site, a Beautiful Cathedral, and a modern highrise (not stunning now, but perhaps one of the first in the city, and building anything that lasts in a seismic area is impressive). It's a perfect metaphor for the city. You have the European, café culture, artsiness, etc, in droves. You have the ancient culture, passion, distinctive tradition, ruins, etc. in droves. And you have the glitzy modern, new money and those trying to become that way, really all manner of humanity's wealth/personalities within a small distance, and while I guess the challenges/inequality within the city is in a way disheartening, there's equally something moving about seeing it all playing out/still finding it's way, and how hard people work there. It gives a feel even in the most ancient of areas (around Templo Mayor), that far from being ancient, the city is still playing out in the present moment and forward.
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Old 05-30-2018, 07:46 PM
 
205 posts, read 145,359 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yihey View Post
The cathedral of Salamanca for example was consecrated in the 12th century and completed in the 14th century.
There are many small towns and cities that built cathedrals centuries before that are surrounded by many buildings that are even older.
Toledo, Avila, Cuenca, Segovia to name a few small cities.
Hundreds of smaller towns.
There is no way on earth Mexico City looks anywhere near as ancient.
When you go to Europe it's the ancient landscapes and architecture that really stands out.
Not the skyscrapers as in Ciudad de México.
Salamanca is nearly 130 miles outside of Madrid... :S

And Segovia Cathedral barely opened in 1525 (around the time Mexico Tenochtitlan was being rebuilt into a colonial capital).

A lot of what you see in Spain is not 2,000 years old. There are Roman sites like the ruins at Tarragona, Merida, etc. but they are not generally well integrated into a city center or as numerous as what one would find in the city of Rome itself.

What visitors to Madrid will find are either very limited examples of Renaissance or baroque architecture... or much more common 18th and 19th century residential architecture sprinkled with art nouveau or art deco buildings.

Madrid's main commercial corridors of Alcala and Gran Via are overwhelmingly lined with beaux art, art nouveu, and art deco buildings (1880s-1930s). Beautiful, because they are so well maintained....but not at all ancient!
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Old 05-31-2018, 06:46 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
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I’ve been to both. While Mexico City was affordable, cool and interesting city I still have to go with Madrid due to being cleaner, safer and in Europe.
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