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View Poll Results: America VS Australia VS Canada
America 51 37.78%
Australia 33 24.44%
Canada 51 37.78%
Voters: 135. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 09-06-2013, 04:32 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fikatid View Post

But when it comes to the UK, Australia is still the number one destination by far (I was reading this statistics some weeks ago. Canada is a distant third or forth if I remembered correctly). I do think that this link between UK and Australia is fascinating, and it doesn't really make the country less diverse or what so ever!
Well, Canada is much older then Australia.

That's interesting because today they are a pretty small component of the Australian migrant intake. On a lighter note, its often Aussies with names like "Jones" who are the first to comment (complain) about "poms", and they're often the most vocal.
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Old 09-06-2013, 04:47 PM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard1098 View Post
The federal model for Australis is US based; and it plays out in the defined role and composition of the Senate. See page six for a simple explanation:
http://www.peo.gov.au/students/cl/Cl...Federation.pdf....
With the exception of the Senate's composition and representation, though (something that will be argued before the Supreme Court of Canada soon, so we may well see some reform of that body), your system seems very much like Canada's. A federated system, with a division of powers between states/provinces and the federal government, and an unelected head of state represented by a governor-general (neither of whom has any real power). To me, that's a lot different than the wide-open-to-interpretation division of powers offered by the US's Tenth Amendment, and a powerful and elected head of state who serves for a set term (no more, no less); among other things.

The Australian constitution also contains a "peace, order, and good government" clause at s. 52 of the Australian constitution. This clause appears in various constitutions of the Commonwealth realms. As much as I dislike Wikipedia in constitutional law discussions (I sure would never use it in an academic paper), I find that in this case, it sums the meaning of this phrase up concisely; and encourages the reader to contrast this phrase and the "life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness" attitude of the United States:

Quote:
In many Commonwealth jurisdictions, the phrase "peace, order and good government" is an expression used in law to express the legitimate objects of legislative powers conferred by statute. The phrase appears in many Imperial Acts of Parliament and Letters Patent, most notably the constitutions of Canada, the Commonwealth of Australia and, formerly, New Zealand and South Africa. Contrast with Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness, a spiritually-similar phrase found in the United States Declaration of Independence.
Either way, I'm surprised that Australia feels that its Constitution is more US-influenced than UK-influenced. With the exception of the Senate's composition, I'm not seeing any meaningful difference between the constitutions of Canada and Australia, though I see large differences between their political system and that of the US.

However, if the Parliamentary Education Office wishes to explain the Australian system of government in terms of "Washminster"; well, not much I can do about that.

Thanks for the answer, Richard--much appreciated!
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Old 09-06-2013, 04:48 PM
 
Location: Stockholm, Sweden
382 posts, read 509,406 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard1098 View Post
Well, Canada is much older then Australia.

That's interesting because today they are a pretty small component of the Australian migrant intake. On a lighter note, its often Aussies with names like "Jones" who are the first to comment (complain) about "poms", and they're often the most vocal.
I am really interested in the rivalry between these two countries, especially in sports. I know next to nothing about cricket but it feels like every time I tune into a sports channel in London the Ashes would be on. I think it's pretty great! And how places like Victoria and Vancouver Island in BC are the hotbed of rugby in North America. Small facts like these I find very fascinating!
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Old 09-06-2013, 04:54 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fikatid View Post
I am really interested in the rivalry between these two countries, especially in sports. I know next to nothing about cricket but it feels like every time I tune into a sports channel in London the Ashes would be on. I think it's pretty great! And how places like Victoria and Vancouver Island in BC are the hotbed of rugby in North America. Small facts like these I find very fascinating!
If only we could teach them football (Aussies rules) and how to surf, then there would be some real rivalry.
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Old 09-06-2013, 04:57 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
With the exception of the Senate's composition and representation, though (something that will be argued before the Supreme Court of Canada soon, so we may well see some reform of that body), your system seems very much like Canada's. A federated system, with a division of powers between states/provinces and the federal government, and an unelected head of state represented by a governor-general (neither of whom has any real power). To me, that's a lot different than the wide-open-to-interpretation division of powers offered by the US's Tenth Amendment, and a powerful and elected head of state who serves for a set term (no more, no less); among other things.

The Australian constitution also contains a "peace, order, and good government" clause at s. 52 of the Australian constitution. This clause appears in various constitutions of the Commonwealth realms. As much as I dislike Wikipedia in constitutional law discussions (I sure would never use it in an academic paper), I find that in this case, it sums the meaning of this phrase up concisely; and encourages the reader to contrast this phrase and the "life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness" attitude of the United States:

Either way, I'm surprised that Australia feels that its Constitution is more US-influenced than UK-influenced. With the exception of the Senate's composition, I'm not seeing any meaningful difference between the constitutions of Canada and Australia, though I see large differences between their political system and that of the US.

However, if the Parliamentary Education Office wishes to explain the Australian system of government in terms of "Washminster"; well, not much I can do about that.

Thanks for the answer, Richard--much appreciated!
Having a very party political, directly elected Senate certainly changes the "tone" of politics.
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Old 09-06-2013, 06:50 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fikatid View Post
The data is from ABS. Even with these statistics there're different ways to collect and present these numbers, depending on which agency and what points they're trying to make. But I think one can generally take the ballpark numbers from these articles seriously, as they are from respectable sources and not made up by a Joe Schmo like myself.

When it comes to ancestry. I am quite interested in this topic myself, and started a thread earlier this year but unfortunately never following it up.

I think each three countries are diverse in their own way, each having some outliers. Australia for example, lacks the proportional nordic or french stock contingent of USA and Canada, but is very well represented by Brits, Irish and Southern Europeans relative to its size.

Take this for example,according to ABS, 36% of Australians has English ancestry, another 35% identify themselves having mainly Australian ancestry. 10% Irish, 9% Scottish, 5% Italian, 5% German, 4% Chinese, 2% Indian, 2% Greek, 2% Dutch and so on.

Compare that to Canada's population, 32% identify themselves as Canadian, 21% English, 16% French, 15% Scottish, 14% Irish, 10% German, 5% Italian, 4% Chinese, 4% Native Americans, 4% Ukrainian, 3% Dutch and so on.

It looks like both countries have a large British/Irish Stocks (as does the US), but Canada does have a much larger stock of people of French (Can 15% vs Aus 0.5%) , German (10% vs Aus 5%), Nordic background (Can 4% vs Aus 0,5%), just to name a few example. But in the end I think beyond that both countries are extremely diverse with recent immigration from all over the world, of which the culture is much more visible compared to the older generations of immigrants from Europe.
The Canadian, Australian and American ethnic ancestries are a bit of a catch-all and really mix things up.

In reality Canada is probably 25% French ethnic ancestry. The English number is certainly considerably higher than 21% as is the Scottish. I am pretty sure than in both Australia and the US the Australian and American ancestries chiefly eat into the numbers for people who have origins in the British Isles, and perhaps in the case of the US certain long-assimilated groups like Germans.
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Old 09-06-2013, 07:49 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
The Canadian, Australian and American ethnic ancestries are a bit of a catch-all and really mix things up.
That's very true. With the blending of ethnic groups that happens pretty soon after any new wave of immigrants arrive, those old groupings and boundaries don't mean much. For example, a close friend of mine has a Dutch born father; her mother is (Australian born - I'm reasonably sure) Chinese. She doesn't see herself as in anyway Dutch or Chinese; simply Australian.

Last edited by Richard1098; 09-06-2013 at 08:00 PM..
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Old 09-06-2013, 08:19 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard1098 View Post
That's very true. With the blending of ethnic groups that happens pretty soon after any new wave of immigrants arrive, those old groupings and boundaries don't mean much. For example, a close friend of mine has a Dutch born father; her mother is (Australian born - I'm reasonably sure) Chinese. She doesn't see herself as in anyway Dutch or Chinese; simply Australian.
In Canada anyway, you could choose multiple ancestries.

Most researchers aren't too thrilled about these new categories, which make their lives difficult as they are such a hodge-podge. It doesn't really show where people's ancestors were from, although it shows how they feel, or what they feel they are. Which is something quite different.

And even then... I can tell you for a fact that a French-speaking Canadian who checks off ''Canadien'' as his ancestry doesn't in any way have the same meaning in mind as Jim Yaremchuck in Saskatchewan or Gordon MacKenzie in Ontario do when they do the same with ''Canadian''.
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Old 09-07-2013, 11:49 AM
 
Location: Chicago(Northside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Traveler86 View Post
Transportation ? Canada

Diversity? Canada has the most diverse city (Toronto), then the US (Nyc), Australia is the last, but still pretty diverse.
Economy?

Schools? Dont really make much difference.

Universities? 1) US , 2) Canada, 3) Australia.

Quality of Life? 1) Canada, 2) US/Australia

Best cities: 1) US has NYC, Chicago, LA, DC, SF, Las Vegas, Miami. 2) Canada has Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver, Quebec. 3) Australia has Sydney and Melbourne.

Best skylines 1) US (nyc, chicago) 2) Canada (Toronto, Montreal) 3) Australia (Sydney, Melbourne)

Nightlife 1) Canada 2) US 3) Australia

Brightest Future 1) Canada 2)US 3) Australia



Overall? If I had to choose to live

1) Canada
2) US
3) Australia
Okay first of all, yes I boost Canada a lot on here now but come on some of this is unrealistic. Quality of life goes to Australia first then America then Canada. Honestly the new England area of America has probably the best quality of life in the world along with the northwest, if America didn't have Mississippi or all those southern states we would be higher and better on every list possible. I believe NYC is the most diverse city out of these countries, los angels is also up there along with Houston and Chicago. Did you seriously put nightlife as Canada, gee talk about close minded, ever been to MIAMI OR LA, there's a reason why celebrities live there along with NYC. For brightest feature Canada is actually going down faster than America...I like Canada but America wins hands down in most categories against Canada.
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Old 09-07-2013, 12:29 PM
 
Location: Windsor, Ontario, Canada
11,269 posts, read 12,496,588 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cali3448893 View Post
Okay first of all, yes I boost Canada a lot on here now but come on some of this is unrealistic. Quality of life goes to Australia first then America then Canada.
Top 5 QOL cities are in Canada, as far as North America goes. (2010 anyways)


Quote:
I believe NYC is the most diverse city out of these countries, los angels is also up there along with Houston and Chicago.

Only NYC bests Totonto in Diversity.


Quote:
Did you seriously put nightlife as Canada, gee talk about close minded, ever been to MIAMI OR LA, there's a reason why celebrities live there along with NYC.
They live in these places because that's where their jobs are.


Quote:
For brightest feature Canada is actually going down faster than America...
Hmm.

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Last edited by Magnatomicflux; 09-07-2013 at 12:47 PM..
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