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Old 02-22-2013, 12:26 PM
 
Location: North West Northern Ireland.
20,695 posts, read 18,578,689 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irish_bob View Post
british = fish and chips

italian = pasta

indian = curry
Fish and chips are as old as the hills some of the chip shops round here are as old as the early 1900s. They are not an import.

It is wholeheartedly part of my culture, tell someone in Northern Ireland that chips are an import and they'll laugh at you. Its more chips and gravy here though. I hate fish.
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Old 02-22-2013, 12:27 PM
 
Location: North West Northern Ireland.
20,695 posts, read 18,578,689 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by french user View Post
if we judge by number of places, but not always best quality

- American (subway, McDonald's, starbucks, etc.)
- Japanese (usually they are Chinese poeple that make suchis!)
- Chinese
I don't consider those as imports. They have been here for centuries and consist of food to is western and that I eat everyday.
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Old 02-22-2013, 09:41 PM
 
6,266 posts, read 6,100,440 times
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As a Chinese I can tell you some details:
Almost all the Chinese restaurants in the US are run by southern Chinese, namely Cantonese, Taiwanese and Fuzhou people. They serve Americanized Chinese food in general, but sometimes provide some specials. Back in China, however, Sichuan cuisine is the most popular nowadays. Some Sichuan restaurants can be found in big US cities, or college towns with a lot of Chinese students. Sichuan food is too spicy for most Americans though.

In recently years, many Chinese restaurants "hire" Mexicans to cook for obvious reasons. In college towns, many of the "waitresses" are students or their spouses from China. Don't be surprised if the girl who serves you has a PhD in mechanical engineering of something.

Last edited by Bettafish; 02-22-2013 at 09:54 PM..
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Old 02-22-2013, 09:53 PM
 
6,266 posts, read 6,100,440 times
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My hometown is a small city in Sichuan, China. McDonald's and KFC have been there for quite a few years and I heard a Pizza Hut is opening soon. Some hotel restaurants serve Indian food, but it is quite pricey. Recently Thai food is becoming popular too.
Korean and Japanese dishes are available, but not very authentic.

European restaurants are not there yet. However some high end restaurants serve western dishes. I heard an Italian man was planning on opening an restaurant there but unfortunately he died. A Canadian woman runs a bakery which also sells coffee. I think Chinese people enjoy dining out and the market has a huge potential.
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Old 02-23-2013, 10:41 AM
 
6,041 posts, read 10,359,348 times
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That is nice to see a large amount of countries developed a modern, worldly, cosmopolitan food scene. Having a wide variety of foods is healthy and fun. Food Scene is not just what people have at restaurants since that is also about what people can get at Supermarkets/Food Stores.

Most countries that qualify not in exact order seem to be: Canada, Australia, France, Singapore, Japan, Taiwan, Netherlands, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Belgium, Switzerland, Germany, UK, USA.

For the country I live in currently, the 3 most popular ethnic foods in most areas of the USA are: Italian, Chinese, Mexican. However, some areas of USA have Thai, Indian in the 3 most popular ethnic cuisines with Italian and replacing the other 2 cuisines. Over time, it seems more areas of USA is going to follow that trend and pattern for Thai and Indian becoming even more popular.


I also had some excellent ethnic food experience when I went to France, UK, and Canada having Thai, Indian, and Italian cuisine over there, other than perfect local traditional original cuisine in France.

In the country I live in now, I frequently have Thai, Indian, and Italian at least 4 times per week. I also have French, Chinese, Japanese, and Mexican cuisine at least once a week.
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Old 02-24-2013, 10:43 PM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
7,653 posts, read 14,751,095 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by f1000 View Post
I know exactly what you mean- most of the US will lump them all together- like having Chinese, Thai, Japanese and a Mongolian stir-fry all on the same premises. You see it all over the US except the West Coast big cities.
Ummmm...really?

In my experience, it's the big cities that tend to have the Asian "fusion" restaurants.

Chinese restaurants are usually (90%?) cheap take-out-oriented places.

Thai restaurants generally segregate themselves from Chinese restaurants with fancier decor and higher prices. However, the dishes may have Chinese influence.

The same thing with Japanese restaurants. An interesting fact is that most of the owners of such establishments are actually Japanese; the Japanese don't have much of a reason to emigrate (unless they are a really talented chef who can open up a really expensive restaurant like Masa in NYC), so other Asians take their place. Of the three Japanese restaurant operations in Duluth, the owner of one is Japanese (married an American who was stationed at Okinawa) and two of them are Hmong.
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Old 02-25-2013, 06:11 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 43,130,167 times
Reputation: 11862
Quote:
Originally Posted by owenc View Post
I don't consider those as imports. They have been here for centuries and consist of food to is western and that I eat everyday.
So hamburgers, hotdogs, and frappacino lattes are all tradition Irish foods, are they?
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