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Old 02-22-2013, 09:32 AM
 
455 posts, read 874,759 times
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Toronto is a more multi-cultural city just for the fact that toronto represents the ideals of what multiculturalism is. "Multiculturalism" itself is essentially a western concept that developed in the mid 60's and early 70's. Whereby greater immigration was opened up to non-western immigrants into western societies, while at the same time allowing them to retain some semblance of their cultures while precipitating a successful integration into the wider society

That is what multiculturalism is, if you want to get specific. What singapore has really is just historical ethnic movements of different ethnic populations over many decades if not centuries. Very different than what modern multiculturalism represents.

When countries and cities around the world are talking about multiculturalism and how to implement or improve it nobody is looking to Singapore because it is so far removed from it.
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Old 02-22-2013, 05:31 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 43,199,552 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mhundred View Post
Toronto is a more multi-cultural city just for the fact that toronto represents the ideals of what multiculturalism is. "Multiculturalism" itself is essentially a western concept that developed in the mid 60's and early 70's. Whereby greater immigration was opened up to non-western immigrants into western societies, while at the same time allowing them to retain some semblance of their cultures while precipitating a successful integration into the wider society

That is what multiculturalism is, if you want to get specific. What singapore has really is just historical ethnic movements of different ethnic populations over many decades if not centuries. Very different than what modern multiculturalism represents.

When countries and cities around the world are talking about multiculturalism and how to implement or improve it nobody is looking to Singapore because it is so far removed from it.
How is it so far removed from it?

In Singapore the government actively encourages people to maintain their cultural traditions. Even to go as far as to require that you take a 'mother tongue' language depending on your 'race.' Maybe they go too far, that's debatable. At the same time there's a lot of mingling of different traditions. An Indian Singaporean might invite his Chinese friend for Deepavali, while the Chinese friend might invite him for Chinese New Year.

While multiculturalism is sometimes celebrated (although remains controversial, our former PM wasn't a big fan) I think it's more tolerated than truly promoted by the government much. Most immigrant children lose their culture pretty quickly, at least here in Australia. Is Canada really that different?
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Old 02-22-2013, 09:04 PM
 
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Based on what I described about what modern multiculturalism is, Australia would also fall under a technically multicultural society just like canada.

Again there is a difference between that and the historical movement of different ethnic groups into one geographic region from many many years ago as in singapore.

What it sounds like you have described and i could be wrong but the requirement of the Singapore government for you to take a "mother tongue" language depending on your "race". Sounds more like very soft segregation, as a sort of a way to keep the different "races" still separate from one and another.

I could be wrong about this as well but i don't believe there are much inter-race relationships in Singapore or many mixed race individuals there?
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Old 02-23-2013, 02:30 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 43,199,552 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mhundred View Post
Based on what I described about what modern multiculturalism is, Australia would also fall under a technically multicultural society just like canada.

Again there is a difference between that and the historical movement of different ethnic groups into one geographic region from many many years ago as in singapore.

What it sounds like you have described and i could be wrong but the requirement of the Singapore government for you to take a "mother tongue" language depending on your "race". Sounds more like very soft segregation, as a sort of a way to keep the different "races" still separate from one and another.

I could be wrong about this as well but i don't believe there are much inter-race relationships in Singapore or many mixed race individuals there?
Yes, perhaps, I guess the Singaporean government sees it as multi-culturalism. Some Singaporeans still see the Chinese or Indians abroad as kin, but it's rare to have more allegiance to say China than Singapore like in the old days.

Inter-racial relationships or mixed kids are not super common but not super rare either. Mixed Chinese and Indians, or 'Chindians' lol, are most common, but Malays and other groups also occasionally. There are also some Eurasians, mixed European and Asian of any race/ethnicity.
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Old 02-23-2013, 09:23 AM
 
Location: In the heights
20,175 posts, read 21,776,227 times
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Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Yes, perhaps, I guess the Singaporean government sees it as multi-culturalism. Some Singaporeans still see the Chinese or Indians abroad as kin, but it's rare to have more allegiance to say China than Singapore like in the old days.

Inter-racial relationships or mixed kids are not super common but not super rare either. Mixed Chinese and Indians, or 'Chindians' lol, are most common, but Malays and other groups also occasionally. There are also some Eurasians, mixed European and Asian of any race/ethnicity.
Singapore recently revived their census to allow for identifying for more than one race (instead of just the father's), right? I think with that we'd get a clear picture of how mixed it is, but I don't remember seeing that many people that were mixed save for a handful of eurasians. My guess is that it'd probably be experiencing a large rise following the same trend that other large and diverse cities such as Toronto are seeing right now.
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Old 02-26-2013, 08:13 PM
 
Location: San Diego CA
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I have relatives in Singapore and have always been fascinated by the racial diversity and in particular the Eurasian community. There are a lot of people, especially the Chinese, who have English ancestors in the family tree and have last names like Shepardson and Wheatley.
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