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Old 03-05-2013, 04:08 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
20,571 posts, read 25,620,517 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pch1013 View Post

And on the same topic, the French word for seal -- the aquatic pinniped -- is "phoque." When I was a little kid learning French, I would joyously toddle around the house saying "Phoque phoque phoque." When my parents objected I just told them I was practicing saying 'seal' in French.

When English Canadian kids, who all take French as a second language in school, first learn this word in French class, they generally spend a few weeks telling each other to "seal off" in the school yard.
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Old 03-05-2013, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Kharkiv, Ukraine
650 posts, read 660,670 times
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If you appear in Russia and you will have an unpleasant conversation you can stop its simple phrase - "chop is dish" (what are you f...... talking)
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Old 03-05-2013, 12:01 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
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^^ Reminds me of a Russian story I read once that featured an amusing dog name: Смелый, which is pronounced "smelly" but means "brave."
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Old 03-05-2013, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Kharkiv, Ukraine
650 posts, read 660,670 times
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Yes, it indeed. In general it is possible to give couple more of dozens similar evfemisms in Russian («peace-door- ball», "Your bunny wrote", «near bird», «More dark», «Some more dark», «Peace data», «Peace-death», «Peace duke», etc. ) but practically all of them are vulgar and the using it in an improper situation can lead to troubles. And their sounding too raises doubts, "Chop is dish (cho pizdish)" sounds most close to Russian.
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Old 03-05-2013, 12:53 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
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I'm sure some Russians think the Polish word "błąd" is quite funny.
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Old 03-05-2013, 09:19 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
20,571 posts, read 25,620,517 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
When English Canadian kids, who all take French as a second language in school, first learn this word in French class, they generally spend a few weeks telling each other to "seal off" in the school yard.
A book that is very popular with my kids and their friends:

Éditions de Mortagne - Fiche Ouate de phoque! Tome 1, Ne rougis pas Léa
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Old 03-05-2013, 10:03 PM
 
Location: Kharkiv, Ukraine
650 posts, read 660,670 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pch1013 View Post
I'm sure some Russians think the Polish word "błąd" is quite funny.
That true, but if to consider that the Polish and Russian languages have the general Slavic basis, this one word. In Polish it means "blad" that is modern Russian "whоrе", but some hundreds years ago in Russian it meant "libertinism". It is noticeable on Czech "blud" which in Czech sounds as deception, and in Russian - fornication.
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Old 03-06-2013, 06:06 PM
 
Location: São Paulo, Brazil
1,484 posts, read 1,644,715 times
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The most classical example of this is perhaps the village of 'Fuc king', in Austria.
And the french word 'cou' (which means 'neck') sounds exactly like the portuguese 'cu', which means 'arse'.
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Old 03-06-2013, 06:13 PM
 
Location: São Paulo, Brazil
1,484 posts, read 1,644,715 times
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Ant the most famous: the spanish phrase: 'hay un tarado pelado con el saco en las manos detrás de la buseta', meaning: 'there is a handicapped man with the jacket in the hands behind the minibus' - if said in portuguese with these same words has a completely obscene meaning.
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Old 03-06-2013, 06:42 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
9,033 posts, read 8,371,897 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabio SBA View Post
The most classical example of this is perhaps the village of 'Fuc king', in Austria.
There's a village in Belgium called A s s e, and another one not too far away in Germany called Titz. The distance between Titz and A s s e is about 200 km.

My favorite Belgian town name is probably Silly.
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