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Old 10-14-2014, 05:35 PM
 
Location: London, UK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Summerwhale View Post
No but they are obsessed with what their ancestry is. Alot of them do not like England. I nearly had a fit when I said that I was from the UK and they said come on you are from Ireland.
I get an impression that Americans think the whole of Ireland is seperate country from the Uk
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Old 10-14-2014, 05:38 PM
 
Location: Northern Ireland
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Yea. They are really quite nasty about England and support the terrorism here. Which really annoys and offends me because of the trauma and hassle that people have gone through in this country.

The Boston university kept secret tapes and would not give them out!!

Boston College
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Old 10-14-2014, 08:37 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
You betcha, and a lot of Irish-Americans who are Catholic aren't embarrassed of calling themselves Catholic. Overwhelming majority of Americans of Irish descent came from what is today the Republic of Ireland.
Do they? I'm pretty sure Ulster Irish descent is actually more common in the US. However it is those of Irish Catholic background who retain an Irish American identity.
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Old 10-14-2014, 08:39 PM
 
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Originally Posted by P London View Post
Are they "Irishtowns" in the US?

I'm guessing if they are it'll be green pubs
South Boston and the South Shore suburbs of Boston?
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Old 10-14-2014, 09:28 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
Do they? I'm pretty sure Ulster Irish descent is actually more common in the US. However it is those of Irish Catholic background who retain an Irish American identity.
No, they aren't. Ulster-Scots (or Scotch-Irish as we call them here) are a small part of the Irish-American community. The majority came from the Republic (as it is known today). Most Scotch-Irish live from the central Pennsylvania mountains to the North Carolina/Tennessee border. A lot of the white kids I went to school with were Ulster-Scots whose great grandparents came to PA from Belfast, including one of my friends.
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Old 10-14-2014, 09:47 PM
 
Location: Canada
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The Irish are not defined by Catholicism, but on the island of Newfoundland they mostly are. These settlers were not Ulster-Scots or anything like that, they were pretty much exclusively Catholics from Munster and the vast majority were Irish speaking. If any protestants came over, they mostly married into the Anglo-Scottish community, as the island was quite strongly divided by religion into the mid 20th century. To the point that Catholicism really did become enmeshed with the idea of what it meant to be Irish in Newfoundland. Like, to the point that people will say things like "I'm half Catholic" to mean they're half Irish, and it's not strange and everyone gets it. So, Irish identity is constructed significantly differently in Newfoundland then it would be in Northern Ireland, for obvious reasons, and I don't really think either is illegitimate in their historical context.
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Old 10-14-2014, 10:20 PM
 
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Yes, the island of Newfoundland may be the most ethnically homogeneous place in North America: the vast majority of the population can trace its roots to either southwest England or Munster in Ireland. The Irish settled mostly in St. John's and the Avalon peninsula and the English dominated the rural areas. So more probably than anywhere, Irish is synonymous with Catholic and Catholic is synonymous with Irish.

ETA: Although the Canadian census puts Irish ancestry at 22% in Newfoundland, it's probably reasonable to assume it's about a third of the province and around 50 percent in St. John's.

Last edited by King of Kensington; 10-14-2014 at 11:30 PM..
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Old 10-14-2014, 11:54 PM
 
Location: Northern Ireland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
No, they aren't. Ulster-Scots (or Scotch-Irish as we call them here) are a small part of the Irish-American community. The majority came from the Republic (as it is known today). Most Scotch-Irish live from the central Pennsylvania mountains to the North Carolina/Tennessee border. A lot of the white kids I went to school with were Ulster-Scots whose great grandparents came to PA from Belfast, including one of my friends.
Its not Belfast its county Londonderry and antrim. I already said I have cousins in PA.
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Old 10-14-2014, 11:58 PM
 
Location: Northern Ireland
3,402 posts, read 2,444,218 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
The Irish are not defined by Catholicism, but on the island of Newfoundland they mostly are. These settlers were not Ulster-Scots or anything like that, they were pretty much exclusively Catholics from Munster and the vast majority were Irish speaking. If any protestants came over, they mostly married into the Anglo-Scottish community, as the island was quite strongly divided by religion into the mid 20th century. To the point that Catholicism really did become enmeshed with the idea of what it meant to be Irish in Newfoundland. Like, to the point that people will say things like "I'm half Catholic" to mean they're half Irish, and it's not strange and everyone gets it. So, Irish identity is constructed significantly differently in Newfoundland then it would be in Northern Ireland, for obvious reasons, and I don't really think either is illegitimate in their historical context.
Well I am not surprised by Newfoundland. I am 1,900 miles away from there and Galway is 1,800 miles so its really not that far to immigrate.

The atlantic ain't that wide. I've flown over newfoundland, I would love to visit as there is a direct flight from Dublin. Apparently they have Irish accents
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Old 10-15-2014, 12:08 AM
 
Location: Northern Ireland
3,402 posts, read 2,444,218 times
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This is my family.

https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MXMM-2T1

That man is my gg uncle
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