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Old 03-26-2013, 08:03 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
40,885 posts, read 32,642,286 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Amen to that! I hate it when people purposely try to change or water down their accent to sound more intelligent or because there's a social stigma attached to it.
LOL you got that right. Besides that, I am confident that my intelligence is quite apparent right through my southern drawl. I don't have to "try to sound smart."
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Old 03-26-2013, 08:33 AM
 
Location: NW Philly Burbs
2,431 posts, read 4,385,933 times
Reputation: 3320
Quote:
Originally Posted by 415_s2k View Post
Do you then find it amazing that people from the UK who move to the US will generally retain their accent years after moving?
I find it amazing that people from many countries retain a strong native accent 50 years after having moved to the US!! And it's not from lack of exposure or interaction -- these are very active people who converse with many others every day (as opposed to sitting at home and talking only in their native tongue.)
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Old 03-26-2013, 09:05 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 43,116,816 times
Reputation: 11862
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blinx View Post
I find it amazing that people from many countries retain a strong native accent 50 years after having moved to the US!! And it's not from lack of exposure or interaction -- these are very active people who converse with many others every day (as opposed to sitting at home and talking only in their native tongue.)
Except, to my great chagrin, Australians it seems...
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Old 03-26-2013, 09:19 AM
 
11,686 posts, read 13,074,643 times
Reputation: 30973
Quote:
Originally Posted by Princess Ping View Post
Having traveled extensively and lived outside the US, I can state with certainty that anything American is disliked by the educated. As for the uneducated, they have been scammed enough to distrust Americans tremendously. They hear an American accent and they automatically seek retribution. My advice is to leave your accent home and learn at least enough of the language to be polite and to be able to understand, if not speak, the language.
I have travelled abroad and live abroad. No one has ever reacted negatively to my accent or my American nationality.
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Old 03-26-2013, 11:16 AM
 
Location: SE UK
7,167 posts, read 6,010,671 times
Reputation: 4787
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geggo View Post
I dont think that countries like or dislike accents, rather the people of these countries.

Anyway, if people like American accents or not often seems to depend on whether they were predominantly taught English by teachers who speak American or British accents. If you are used or exposed to American English only you will likely prefer that accent and find the British (or rather English) one strange.
Which one?
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Old 03-26-2013, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Germany
797 posts, read 1,327,744 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by easthome View Post
Which one?
Any one. It does not matter. To a German who is used to American English only any British English accent is strange, just as the German who was brought up with British school English (which is usually a standard southern variety or BBC English) would not be able to distinguish American English spoken in New York from a Texan dialect. It would all be a strange American accent in the latter case.

The same can be said of any British or American student who comes to Germany, Austria or Switzerland and realises that the accent spoken there is not the same one as taught in school.
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Old 03-26-2013, 04:40 PM
 
Location: SE UK
7,167 posts, read 6,010,671 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geggo View Post
Any one. It does not matter. To a German who is used to American English only any British English accent is strange, just as the German who was brought up with British school English (which is usually a standard southern variety or BBC English) would not be able to distinguish American English spoken in New York from a Texan dialect. It would all be a strange American accent in the latter case.

The same can be said of any British or American student who comes to Germany, Austria or Switzerland and realises that the accent spoken there is not the same one as taught in school.
I don't think you realize just how different English accents are do you?
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Old 03-26-2013, 06:17 PM
 
Location: Germany
797 posts, read 1,327,744 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by easthome View Post
I don't think you realize just how different English accents are do you?
What makes you believe I would not realise that?

I am referring to the average non-native speaker who does not or is not able to differentiate between whatever regional dialect (or accent, if you like) there is. Most of them can differentiate between American and British English, but not beyond.

I am sure you know that there are at least as many German dialects/accents as there are English ones, but as an non-speaker of my variety of German you would not be able to distinguish the differences between the local dialects of the two German villages being spaced 3 kms apart where I grew up.

Dialects exist on many levels and can be different from village to village. So although I am aware that there are many different dialects in every country, I am not even able to differentiate between some dialects in my own country. For example, the German spoken in the northern German cities of Hamburg and Bremen differ, but as I speak a German which is close to Swiss German I am unable to understand these differences.

So this is my point - regardless how many different English/German/French... accents or dialects there may be, to the average non-native Speaker these accents all sound quite the same. And if you were taught standard French or German in school, you will, at least initially, be quite shocked to hear the local French or German dialect/accent, and possibly dislike it or even won't understand at all.

At least this is what all my interns told me (who studied translation and German at BA or MA level), and they came from all over the UK, and also France, Russia and China. So for them to communicate with me I have to speak standard German to them and not the dialect I was brought up with.

Last edited by Geggo; 03-26-2013 at 06:31 PM..
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Old 03-26-2013, 06:34 PM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
9,620 posts, read 12,783,261 times
Reputation: 11167
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geggo View Post
What makes you believe I would not realise that?

I am referring to the average non-native speaker who does not or is not able to differentiate between whatever regional dialect (or accent, if you like) there is.

I am sure you know that there are at least as many German dialects/accents as there are English ones, but as an non-speaker of my variety of German you would not be able to distinguish the differences between the local dialects of the two German villages being spaced 3 kms apart where I grew up.

Dialects exist on many levels and can be different from village to village. So although I am aware that there are many different dialects in every country, I am not even able to differentiate between some dialects in my own country. For example, the German spoken in the northern German cities of Hamburg and Bremen differ, but as I speak a German which is close to Swiss German I am unable to understand these differences.

So this is my point - regardless how many different English/German/French... accents or dialects there may be, to the average non-native Speaker these accents all sound quite the same. And if you were taught standard French or German in school, you will, at least initially, be quite shocked to hear the local French or German dialect/accent, and possibly dislike it or even won't understand at all. At least this is what all my interns told me (who studied German at BA or MA level), and they came from all over the UK. So for them to communicate with me I speak standard German to them and not the dialect I was brought up with.
I think that the average American who isn't from the Northeast can't tell the difference between a Boston accent and a New York accent, though they're quite plain to me since I was raised there... I'm sure that someone who's a non-American English speaker, whether another form of English is their mother tongue or not, would also have difficulty discerning the difference.

However, the difference between a Texan accent and a New York accent is like the difference between an England-English accent and a Scottish accent... I think most people would be able to pick out the different inflections, candor, tones, and the drastically different pronounciation of R's enough that they'd be able to tell (with a NY/Boston accent, the R's tend to be dropped unless they're the first letter of the word; you'd pronounce the name "Richard," "Riche'hd." With a southern accent, you still pronounce the R's, but you drop them lower in your throat, so it'd be more like "Richurd.")
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Old 03-26-2013, 06:48 PM
 
13,817 posts, read 12,605,948 times
Reputation: 6460
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geggo View Post
What makes you believe I would not realise that?

I am referring to the average non-native speaker who does not or is not able to differentiate between whatever regional dialect (or accent, if you like) there is. Most of them can differentiate between American and British English, but not beyond.

I am sure you know that there are at least as many German dialects/accents as there are English ones, but as an non-speaker of my variety of German you would not be able to distinguish the differences between the local dialects of the two German villages being spaced 3 kms apart where I grew up.

Dialects exist on many levels and can be different from village to village. So although I am aware that there are many different dialects in every country, I am not even able to differentiate between some dialects in my own country. For example, the German spoken in the northern German cities of Hamburg and Bremen differ, but as I speak a German which is close to Swiss German I am unable to understand these differences.

So this is my point - regardless how many different English/German/French... accents or dialects there may be, to the average non-native Speaker these accents all sound quite the same. And if you were taught standard French or German in school, you will, at least initially, be quite shocked to hear the local French or German dialect/accent, and possibly dislike it or even won't understand at all.

At least this is what all my interns told me (who studied translation and German at BA or MA level), and they came from all over the UK, and also France, Russia and China. So for them to communicate with me I have to speak standard German to them and not the dialect I was brought up with.
Well yeah...
After you meet so many Germans ( Brits, French, Americans,) you start realizing that their language sounds somewhat different, depending on the region. Sometimes you have to "adjust" you ear listening to certain person, because you already know that he/she speaks some dialect.
Having lived in Midwest for so long, my ear is very accustomed to local pronunciation, it feels kinda "homey," but I still dislike the way Southern accents sound in the US.
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